The Weekend Spill: New Addition To The Spill Library; The Tilley Watch Online; Videos (And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

_________________________________________________________________________

New Addition To The Spill Library

Part of the Spill‘s (self charged) charge is to keep in mind all those cartoonists who have been and are part of The New Yorker, not just the names up in lights. Larry Reynolds, having contributed to several of the biggest magazines of his day (including Collier’s, and The Saturday Evening Post) also had three drawings in The New Yorker.  In the July 1st Spill post I showed you a collection of his ongoing character, Butch, who appeared in Collier’s.  Above is the only other example (to my knowledge) of Reynolds’ work in book form. Lines Of Least Resistance, published in 1941 by E.P. Dutton & company, Inc., contains work from all three of the magazines just mentioned as well as drawings from Elks Magazine.  If my count is correct, there are 24 of his drawings in the book, plus the cover and back cover (3 drawings found in the book).

In the drawing shown above you clearly see a Gluyas Williams influence in his work — old man Kelly and two of the other characters — the men — on the right side of the drawing could’ve been in a Gluyas Williams drawing. The fellow in the forefront right, smoking a pipe, and the man running just below the Pelham sign look similar to George Price’s style (especially the way Reynolds drew the running fellow’s legs).  Other drawings seem to carry a heavy influence of a number of other cartoonists. Look at the one below: shades of Syd Hoff and the early work of William Steig (even, a hint of a Helen Hokinson luncheon lady in the frame). I’m led to wonder if Reynolds ever quite settled on a look of his very own.

Larry Reynolds entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Larry Reynolds (Photo from I Feel Like A Cad, 1944; self portrait above right from Colliers Collects Its Wits, Harcourt Brace & Co., 1941) Born, Mt. Vernon, NY, c. 1912.  Died, March 4, 2002, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. New Yorker work: 3 drawings: Jan 7, 1939 / Feb 24, 1940 / April 6, 1940. Collection of Note: I Feel Like A Cad (drawings from Collier’s Weekly).  Link to Allan Holtz’s Reynold’s Stripper’s Guide Profile here.

__________________________________________________________________________

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists* who have contributed to newyorker.com features

July 6 -July 10, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Yasin Osman, Will Santino, Amy Kurzweil, John Cuneo, Patrick McKelvie, J.A.K.

Video: How To Draw A Child by Emma Allen** & Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

*For clarity, the names of artists who have not yet appeared in the print magazine are not bolded.

**Emma Allen is The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor

_______________________________________________________________

Videos ( And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Here are links to two videos that are part of the Liza Donnelly exhibit at The Norman Rockwell Museum (it opens to the public tomorrow).

This link takes you to a video of Donnelly talking about her live drawing.

And this link takes you to an in depth look at her career.

Also: there’s an app that features Donnelly speaking about individual pieces in the exhibit. See the video about it here.

Personal History: Attended Donnelly’s “virtual art opening” last night, except it wasn’t virtual for me — I was there. Watched as Donnelly (who besides being a colleague, is also my wife) gave a tour, being followed by a cameraman wielding a “live” camera and a photographer documenting the moment (the above photo was not taken by the photographer — it was taken by me with my flip-phone camera as the cartoonist spoke about her sketchbooks in the display case).

For me, the most touching piece on display is also, I believe, the most modest in scale — it may be the smallest piece in the exhibit. It’s the drawing that leaped Ms. Donnelly into The New Yorker;   the first drawing of hers bought, but not the first run. Though OKed (bought) in 1979, it did not run until the issue of November 22, 1982. I believe she speaks about it in the longer video I’ve linked to above.

Go see the exhibit, non-virtually, if you’re up that way. It’s a real treat.

 

 

 

 

Henry Martin’s New York Times Obit; Personal History: Cartoonist Correspondence; Article Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Gayle Kabaker; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Henry Martin’s New York Times Obit

From The New York Times, July 7, 2020, “Henry Martin, Wry New Yorker Cartoonist, Dead at 94″

Here’s Richard Sandomir’s obit for the wonderful Henry Martin, who passed away a week ago today, just two weeks shy of his 95th birthday.

__________________________________________________________________________

Personal History: Cartoonist Correspondence

One of the many pleasures of being a New Yorker cartoonist has been, and continues to be communicating with so many other cartoonists, both new and veteran. I opened my binder of cartoonist correspondence this afternoon to remind myself of the content of the half-dozen letters I exchanged with Henry Martin. One, dated March 10, 2000, was in response to a letter I had written him asking about his Spot work for the magazine (you’ll see a link in The N.Y. Times obit for more on his Spots). Here’s how he replied:

“…almost no one is [interested in Spots] but I loved them and they helped me get my foot in the door at The New Yorker. Most of them were done on scratch board — not much in use anymore — and nearly all were done exact size.

I did that so that I knew just how they would look in the magazine and didn’t have to worry about how they would look enlarged or reduced. In many ways they were more fun to do than cartoons, but of course, they didn’t pay as well and had no reprint value except for The New Yorker…at some point around 1965 I quit doing spots, thinking I’d return to them later. When I did, sometime after Lee took over [Lee Lorenz, The New Yorker‘s art editor, who succeeded James Geraghty in 1973] I found my eyes could no longer adjust to the small size, and I was having trouble finding good scratch board. The best I found was made in Austria and the manufacturer went out of business!…There were many great artists doing Spots…I thought they added so much to the magazine.” 

_______________________________________________________________

Article Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist, Gayle Kabaker

From The Washington Post, July 6, 2020, “Sketching My Way Through Crisis”

–this second piece in a series by Ms. Kabaker.

Visit her website here.

Left: Ms. Kabaker’s January 30, 2017 New Yorker cover

______________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Amy Kurzweil on no more funding for the arts.

Ms. Kurzweil began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

Visit her website here.

The Weekend Spill: A 1934 July 4th Moment By Steig; Bliss’s American Bystander Cover; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th-July 3rd, 2020; More Spills: Eckstein’s Beast Piece, A Hoff Mural, and More Henry Martin

William Steig’s 1934 New Yorker cover celebrating the 4th of July  seems to capture the mood of this particular 4th when we have been urged to stay at home, away from gatherings. It was, of course, published during another deeply troubled time in our history.

Here’s William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

___________________________________________________________________________________

American Bystander‘s Michael Gerber has released the cover of his next issue (#15 for those keeping track). Cover by Harry Bliss. You can order your copy here. If this issue is anything like the previous 14 it’ll be worth the five bucks (Cheap!).

 Harry Bliss began contributing cartoons and covers to The New Yorker  in January of 1998.  A Wealth Of Pigeon: A Cartoon Collection (a collaboration with Steve Martin) will be out this November.

_____________________________________________________________________________

The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th – July 3rd, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Madeline Horwath, Peter Kuper, Julia Suits, Sara Lautman, Akeem Roberts.

Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above, and so much more, go here.

______________________________________________________________________________

Bob Eckstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007, has begun writing for The Daily Beast. See his first post here.

…Prompted by a post in the Facebook Vintage Panel And Gag Cartoon Group about a Syd Hoff mural, I checked out this piece from The Orange County Register from July 6, 2007.

…More Henry Martin: it’s so great that Henry Martin is listed on this plaque at the old (but not the oldest!) New Yorker offices at 25 West 43rd Street.

 

The Weekend Spill: Cartoonists Offer #Cartoonrelief To Those Hit Hardest By Covid-19; The Tilley Watch Online, March 30 – April 3, 2020; Tom Gauld’s Collection Reviewed

_____________________________________

While checking in on a New Yorker cartoonist Slack group a few days ago I noticed a number of my cartoonist colleagues had begun using their art to help those in need during this pandemic. I asked if one of the organizers would explain in detail what they were up to. So here is my New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Amy Kurzweil to tell you about an incredibly worthy effort, #Cartoonrelief:

#Cartoonrelief was born on the New Yorker Cartoonist Slack channel. Navied Mahdavian posted that he’d just bought some photographs from Italian artists raising money for local hospitals, and wanted to know if we cartoonists were interested in selling prints or drawings for a coronavirus cause. I was just about to do something similar on my instagram; a couple times annually I sell prints and originals and give half the proceeds to charity, and this seemed like a moment to up my charitable game. I chose (and often raise money for) Give Directly because their charitable model makes the most sense to me; they give unconditional, direct cash transfers to people living in extreme poverty; they’re highly rated by charity watch orgs because their model means overhead costs are low and decisions about how to spend money are as local as possible. Usually their efforts are global, but right now they have a fund that sends cash to US families hit hardest by COVID-19. 
Other cartoonists jumped on board, and we each made our own choices about what to offer and for how much, given our various constraints at the moment. Avi Steinberg is offering digital portraits, Navied Mahdavian is offering original cartoon drawings, Brendan Loper is offering original cartoon drawings, digital prints, and pet portraits, Sofia Warren is offering originals portraits and original collaborative cartoons, Kendra Allenby is offering signed prints and one-on-one art consultations, Ivan Ehlers is offering prints and custom digital portraits. Neil Dvorak is offering prints, Tom Chitty is drawing robots on horses. Each of our offerings is set at a different price-point, between $25 and $125; people just have to message us the receipt for their donation. I’m offering drawn portraits for $100 and personalized digital cartoon prints for $50. Most people are going for portraits, usually of a loved one: a child they’re quarantining with, a partner they are or aren’t quarantining with, a coworker they’re missing. Although it’s been a lot of work, it’s felt quite meaningful to enter people’s lives momentarily through the act of drawing the people they love. All the responses have been incredibly validating. Here are a few of the portraits I’ve done so far:
And here are some other offerings:
Original Cartoons from Navied:
A collaborative cartoon from Sofia and a donating contributor:
I’ve noticed people have been making much larger donations than I suggest. For example, someone just sent me a receipt for $1000. I think people who can give, want to give, and they appreciate encouragement and validation for doing so. Together we’ve raised $8,000 +… and counting!
If you’d like to join us: Our efforts are unified under the hashtag #cartoonrelief, and any cartoonists can get involved by offering whatever art they can, for a COVID-19 related charitable cause. We’re encouraging of cartoonists and cartoon supporters to propose their own charity or fund they believe is helping with medical or economic relief right now.
If people have any questions about how to get involved, or want to support our efforts, you can reach out to any of the cartoonists mentioned above on Instagram, or email me directly: amykurz@gmail.com 
___________________________________________________________________
A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week of March 30 – April 3, 2020.
The Daily Cartoon: Peter Kuper, Shannon Wheeler, Jon Adams, Johnny Dinapoli, Kendra Allenby.
Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Jason Chatfield (with Ginny Hogan), Avi Steinberg.
…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.
____________________________________________________________
Tom Gauld’s Cartoon Collection Reviewed
Mr. Gauld is a New Yorker cover artist.

 

Weekend Spill: Signing Of Interest: J.A.K. At Word Brooklyn; Eckstein’s Books; The Tilley Watch Online, October 21-25, 2019

Signing Of Interest: J.A.K.

Mark your calendar: J.A.K. will be signing The White Man’s Guide To Male Writers Of The Western Canon November 13th at Word Brooklyn.  Info here.

Mr. Katzenstein has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014.

 

 

_________________________________________________________

Eckstein’s Books

From East Coast/West Coast/North Coast, October 27, 2019,  “Bob Eckstein and His World’s Greatest Bookstores”

— Mr. Eckstein began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 2007.  Visit his website here.

His latest book is Everyone’s A Critic.

_______________________________________________________________________

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to The Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Ellis Rosen, Johnny DiNapoli, Peter Kuper, and Teresa Burns Parkhurst.

Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil, J.A.K. (with Dana Schwartz).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

To see the above and much more link here.