The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 23, 2019

The Cover: How great it is to see a J.J. Sempe cover.  A very short Q&A with Mr. Sempe here.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Some random thoughts:  Enjoyed Amy Hwang’s guillotine/watermelon drawing (p. 30) — guillotine drawings are rare but usually memorable (Tom Cheney’s from February 24, 1997 for instance, or this one from George Booth, also published in 1997, in the June 9th issue).  Ms. Hwang’s hooded henchman is not alone in the issue.  Another appears in Emily Flake’s court jester drawing (p.39).  It’s sort of a first cousin to another Cheney guillotine drawing published November 1, 2010.

Much enjoyed Robert Leighton’s frogs drawing (p.63). I just had to look up previous lily pad frog drawings and came across this beauty from the great Warren Miller published March 5, 1990 (one of several frog on lily pad drawings referencing Monet).

There’s a lot going on graphically in Bruce Eric Kaplan’s very funny drawing (p.45) but a wee meatball is the star.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic heading shown below is still a-missin. Read about it here.

 

The Weekend Spill: Exhibit Of Interest “Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”; The Tilley Watch Online, Sept. 2-6, 2019; Profile Of Interest: Roz Chast

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Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists

A must-see exhibit curated by Jeremy Nguyen and Amy Hwang.  All the info above!

Alice Cheng began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017; Maddie Dai in 2017; Amy Hwang in 2010; Suerynn Lee in 2019; Evan Lian in 2019; Hartley Lin in 2019; Christine Mi in 2018; Jeremy Nguyen in 2017, and Colin Tom in 2015.

You can see work by all of the above artists here on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

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The Tilley Watch Online, September 2-6, 2019

 

A gathering of the New Yorker cartoonists whose work appeared this week on The Daily Cartoon and/or  Daily Shouts.

Daily Cartoon: John Cuneo (a Bonus Daily), Ali Solomon, Tim Hamilton, J.A.K., and Jon Adams.

Daily Shouts: Avi Steinberg (with Irving Ruan).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

See all of the above and more here.

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Profile of Interest: Roz Chast

From Hamilton College, September 6, 2019, “Drawing On Fidgety Brilliance” — a short profile of Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. Visit her website here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of September 9, 2019

The Cover:

It’s the Style Issue this week….thus the bountiful polka dots on Malika Favre’s eighth cover for the magazine. A Q&A with the artist here. If you link to the Q&A you’ll see the polka dot dress swirl.

I can’t see that many polka dots (and red) on the cover without thinking of Peter Arno’s March 23, 1935 New Yorker cover. It was also used as the cover for The Seventh New Yorker Album.

The dalmatians cover is perhaps overly familiar to me because it’s the front endpaper of my biography of Arno. Hey, what can I say? I like dogs…and Arno.

 

The Cartoonists and Cartoons

With the appearance of another team effort (third? fourth?) by Pia Guerra and Ian Boothby I think we’re in new territory as far as crediting a writing team goes for single panel cartoons in the magazine. Someone please correct me if there has been another duo credited beyond one or two appearances (Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb come to mind, but their work is in a different realm, i.e., their “thing” is not single panel cartoons). The duo of Guerra & Boothby have given us a slightly different take on the usual cartoonist’s representation of Noah’s Ark (the drawing appears on page 78). Instead of the long ramp leading up to the ark, it’s more of a tailgate.  It works well here.

Of note: Elisabeth McNair’s drawing of the tortoise and the hare (p. 72). If you remove the art hanging on the wall, and the door frame, the cartoon could easily be seen as descended from the school of (Charles) Barsotti minimalism. Love the turtle’s expression.

Also of note: Hilary Fitzgerald Cambell’s spooky “campfire” story-time drawing (p.49). At first glance I thought the scene was outdoors, but then saw the light sockets in the background with a charging electronic device (a phone?) connected to one of them. That it plays a trick on the eyes — intended or not — is pleasing, as is the drawing itself.

Further of note: Ed Steed adds another drawing to the cartoon canon of mounted something (in this case, someone) or others on the wall (p. 25).

Being the great grandson of bakers, and a fan of baked goods in general, it was a nice surprise  seeing pastries as a focus in Amy Hwang’s drawing (p. 43). Also a nice surprise: seeing Glen Baxter’s drawing (p.68). While a number of cartoonists box in their drawings, Baxter’s boxes somehow seem part of the drawing within, if that makes any sense (is the word “integral” — maybe, maybe not).

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead: Still not home. Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

Addams Family Trailer; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Duffy’s Strip Celebrates Its 30th

Addams Family Trailer

Here’s the official first trailer for the animated film out October 11th.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

 Amy Hwang on central a/c. Ms. Hwang’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born, Arlington, Texas, 1978. New Yorker work: November 8, 2010 –. Ms. Hwang’s website

 

 

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J.C. Duffy’s Strip Celebrates Its 30th

From The Daily Cartoonist, August 7, 2019, “The Fusco Brothers At 30 (Not -30-)”

Joe Duffy’s strip celebrates its 30th anniversary. Mr. Duffy’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

J.C. Duffy  New Yorker work: November 9, 1998 – .Website:www.cartoonistgroup.com/properties/fuscobros/home.php