Video Of Interest: The “Sesame Street” Edition Of The New Yorker Caption Contest; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Video Of Interest: The “Sesame Street” Edition of The New Yorker Caption Contest

Here’s 7 1/2 minutes of fun: several of Sesame Street’s beloved characters give The New Yorker‘s caption contest a go.

Cartoons shown in order of their appearance are by: David Borchart, Joe Dator, Tom Cheney, Ellis Rosen, Harry Bliss, Mick Stevens, Amy Hwang, P.C. Vey, and yours truly.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Happy (?) holidays, by Tom Toro.  Mr. Toro has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2010. Visit his website here.

 

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“Horoscopes As Unintelligible Words” by Olivia de Recat, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018.  Visit her website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 11, 2019

The Cover: Bruce McCall returns with a cut-away cover. I can’t think of a New Yorker cut-away drawing without thinking of this Charles Addams classic from April 28, 1951 (found on the left, mid-way down the link page). 

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the cartoons in this week’s issue:

…as a P.S. Mueller fan, and as someone who loves cowboy drawings, it was a blast coming upon his drawing on page 75….

…there are two cartoons in the issue as a result of team work: one by Kamraan Haffeez and Al Batt, the other by Corey Pandolf and Craig Baldo…

… work appears by two of the three New Yorker cartoonists who’ve been published in The New Yorker longer than any of the other active contributors*: Edward Koren and George Booth. Edward Koren’s first New Yorker cartoon was published May 26, 1962. Mr. Booth’s first New Yorker drawing was published in the issue of June 14, 1969. *Mort Gerberg is second — his first drawing appeared in April of 1965. It should be noted that Sam Gross is hot on Mr. Booth’s heels — his first New Yorker drawing appeared August 23, 1969, two months after Mr. Booth’s first.

…the way Karen Sneider drew the two characters in her fun cartoon (p.80) vaguely reminds me of Chon Day’s work. Mr. Day’s style seemed to me a way more organized and orderly version of Thurber’s. Mr. Day did wonders with a simple line, and an occasional layer of faint wash.

…really like the pay-off of Amy Hwang’s caption in her drawing (on page 61).

…congrats to all the runners in yesterday’s NYC Marathon, including our very own Liza Donnelly    who ran the big race for the very first time (her “Was Married” drawing appears on page 78).

The Rea Irvin Missing (and Missed) Talk Masthead Watch

The above jewel has been missing from The New Yorker since the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Washington Post’s Dana Fradon Obit; Article Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist & Cartoonist Robert Kraus; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; The Asian Babies Exhibition Catalog

From The Washington Post,  “Dana Fradon, prolific New Yorker cartoonist with a satirical edge, dies at 97” by Harrison Smith. The piece includes a terrific photo of Mr. Fradon by Anne Hall Elser who was assistant to Lee Lorenz during his sterling run (1973- 1997) as the magazine’s art editor.

Above: a drawing by Mr. Fradon that appeared in The New Yorker March 22, 1969

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Article Of Interest: Robert Kraus

From The Ridgefield Press, October 19, 2019, “Ridgefield Notables: Robert Kraus, New Yorker Cartoonist”

— above: Mr. Kraus and two of his twenty-one New Yorker covers.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The rich around the campfire by Maddie Dai, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

 

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The Asian Babies Exhibition Catalog

The catalog for Pearl River Mart’s exhibit,  “Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists” is available online as a free download here.

Below, two artist pages out of the ten artists showing their work.

 

Amy Hwang On “Asian Babies: Work From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”

Here’s The New Yorker cartoonist Amy Hwang writing about the current Pearl River Mart Gallery exhibit: “Asian Babies: Work From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”

When I started drawing cartoons for The New Yorker in 2010, I did not think much of the fact that I was possibly the only cartoonist of Asian* descent contributing at the time. It was hard enough to get into the magazine, so I was mainly focused on staying in it by consistently sending in cartoon batches hoping that more would sell. Eventually, I realized I was an anomaly. Being the only Asian New Yorker cartoonist contributing at that time, I felt pressure to keep producing cartoons as if I was an endangered species.

My cartoons are not explicitly “Asian” in topic or style, and without seeing my surname at the bottom corner of my drawings, most people probably wouldn’t think that I am Asian-American at all. I decided from the beginning to sign my cartoons legibly with my full name so that anyone seeing them would surmise that I was both female and Asian, both of which are underrepresented groups among cartoonists. I did this in hopes that there might be some recognition of that fact even if it was subconscious. I also did this so my friends wouldn’t ask me which cartoons were mine. But they still did.

Asian Babies
Jeremy Nguyen, Christine Mi, Amy Hwang, Suerynn Lee, and Joanne Kwong (President of Pearl River Mart) are shown L to R.

Nearly ten years later, there are now several New Yorker cartoonists of Asian descent currently contributing to the magazine. Many, like myself, are based in the United States: Colin Tom, Jeremy Nguyen, Christine Mi, Suerynn Lee, and Evan Lian. Alice Cheng and Hartley Lin are in Canada, and Maddie Dai is a Kiwi living in England. All of them seem young to me. Or rather, I feel old next to them. But I am still caught off guard when any of them will mention my work as if it has been around forever. The passage of time is funny that way. I was well into adulthood when my first cartoon was printed in the magazine, but many of them were practically kids.

Jeremy Nguyen approached me a little over a year ago to curate Asian Babies with him. He had the idea to have a group show featuring New Yorker cartoonists of Asian descent, and the Pearl River Mart Gallery was the perfect venue for our small group. The exhibition developed organically. When we started planning, we had about five cartoonists. In late 2018 and into 2019, four more had their first cartoons printed in The New Yorker, so we added them. There is no way of knowing if we included every cartoonist of Asian descent in the show, but we tried our best by looking at everyone’s surnames which certainly isn’t 100 percent foolproof.

Jeremy Nguyen, Nicolette Leung Renz (granddaughter of Monroe Leung – with her baby), Amy Hwang are shown L to R.

One month before the show was slated to open, Jeremy came across the name Monroe Leung. He was listed with other cartoonists who had had only one cartoon published in The New Yorker. His cartoon was published in 1949. Jeremy was able to contact Monroe’s daughter Corinne Leung Katow with the help of cartoonist Michael Maslin, and we secured permission to include Monroe’s New Yorker cartoon and other works of his in our show. I think people will be as surprised as we were when they discover his works among the others. In my view, he was years ahead of his time.

©Monroe Leung, The Sun

Monroe passed away in 2004, several years before my first cartoon was printed in The New Yorker. And while he may have been the only New Yorker cartoonist of Asian descent in his lifetime, I take comfort in knowing he is no longer alone today.

*Asian in this article refers to East Asian and Southeast Asian

— By Amy Hwang

Asian Babies: Works from Asian New Yorker Artists
Pearl River Mart Gallery
395 Broadway, NYC
Open every day, 10 a.m. to 7:20 p.m. Free and open to the public.

Note: this piece originally appeared on a commercial site. It appears here through the kind permission of Ms. Hwang.