The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday: Fave Cover; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Article Of Interest: “School Days Influences…”

Of all the Thurber books published in his lifetime it’s the cover of Let your Mind Alone! that I’ve always liked best. Notice I said the cover, and not the book (I like the book too, but it’s not my favorite).

The cover relies on a single Thurber drawing, “Motorman Concealing His Sex Life from a Woman Psychologist” (it appears, run vertically, in Chapter 9).

I’ve never thought too much about why the cover is so appealing (and I won’t now) — it’s just one of those things. A quick thought is that the cover drawing seems an odd choice considering the other choices within. Perhaps it’s the oddity that’s appealing.

According to Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography , the first edition (published September of ’37) was  5000 copies. By year’s end there were six editions.

A few things about my copy: someone glued the dust jacket flap — just the flap — on the inside front cover of my copy. And: next to the fellow on the right, there’s a barely visible white line impression of the fellow walking off under the glued down flap. 

Funnily enough, even though the dust jacket cover is my fave, I do not have it (other than that glued inside flap mentioned above). My copy, a first edition, bought for $2.50 (‘as is”) decades ago, was coverless.

There are a number of later editions, with other covers, but for me, the first is the best (the Armed Services Edition is pretty great too).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Maddie Dai on a deep-sixed Christopher Columbus.

Ms. Dai began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit her website here.

 

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From The Elective, June 11, 2020, “School Days Influences: Inside The World Of New Yorker Cartoonists”

Eight* New Yorker cartoonists and one** cover artist on their schooling.

*Lila Ash, Liza Donnelly, Amy Hwang, Navied Mahdavian, Sam Marlow, Liz Montague, Jeremy Nguyen, Ellis Rosen, **Robert Sikoryak.

Illustration: Michael Witte‘s cover for The New Yorker Book Of Teacher Cartoons

 

 

 

The Weekend Watch: More New Yorker Cartoons On CBS Sunday Morning; One More Addition To Attempted Bloggery’s Mini-Arno Fest; The Tilly Watch Online, May 25-29, 2020

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More New Yorker Cartoons On CBS Sunday Morning

Here’s another brief slide show of pandemic-related cartoons shown today, with work by Jon Adams, Carolita Johnson, Johnny DiNapoli, and Avi Steinberg.

 

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One More Addition To Attempted Bloggery’s Mini-Peter Arno Fest

The Attempted Bloggery mini-Arno fest ends with a look at The Bedside Tales anthology (Armed Services Edition). See it here!

 

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An end of week listing of contributors to newyorker.com features, May 25-29, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Luke McGarry, Ben Schwartz, Drew Dernavich, Amy Hwang, Johnny DiNapoli.

Daily Shouts: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Sofia Warren.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Fly Musk To The Moon”

To see all of the above and more, go here.

Note: The Spill site was down for a number of hours late yesterday due to technical difficulties. Sorry about that!

Fave Photo Of The Day: Zoomin’ New Yorker Cartoonists; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…and Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; The Holiday Daily Cartoonists

One of the things cartoonists like to do, besides work on cartoons, is gather with other cartoonists. Here’s a crew of Zoomin’ New Yorker cartoonists that gathered yesterday: from top left, going clockwise: Robert Leighton, Bob Eckstein, Ken Krimstein, and Pat Byrnes.

Mr. Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002; Bob Eckstein in 2007;

Ken Krimstein in 2000; Pat Byrnes in 1998.

— My thanks to Bob Eckstein for the screen grab.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…and The Holiday Daily Cartoonists:

Today’s: Eugenia Vita (with Ginny Hogan): “Initial Interpretations Of Quarantine Terms Before I Knew What They Meant”Eugenia Viti has contributed cartoons to The New Yorker since June of last year.

The Holiday Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Sofia Warren with “How My Misdirected Feelings Have Come Out Lately”…Ms. Warren has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist:

Today’s: Amy Hwang on the calendar these days.

Ms. Hwang has contributed to The New Yorker since 2010.

The Holiday Daily Cartoonist: Johnny DiNapoli, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2019.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 4, 2020

The Cover: In Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with this week’s cover artist, Chris Ware, she informs us that the issue is anchored by “a kaleidoscopic account of a single day in New York.”  And so we see a cover, in Mr. Ware’s patented style, loaded with snapshots of the city —  a cover nearly devoid of people.

The Cartoonists:

Liza Donnelly, Robert Leighton, Amy Hwang, Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, Liana Finck, Julia Suits, Frank Cotham, Lars Kenseth, Peter Steiner, Karl Stevens, Edward Steed, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon

The Cartoons:

First thing I noticed zipping through this week’s cartoons (via the slideshow on newyorker.com) is that 9 of the 14 drawings contain non-humans. Is this unusual? I don’t know; haven’t kept track of the human/non-human ratio of the cartoons over the years [if anyone has, please let me know — I’d love to see the numbers]. What may be unusual are the three drawings in a row containing two animals apiece: Ed Steed’s two cows, Elisabeth McNair’s pig and squirrel, and Ali Solomon’s two seals.

The remaining half-dozen cartoons featuring non-humans: Peter Steiner’s shark (fins), Lars Kenseth’s multitude of rabbits, Roz Chast’s cow, Liana Finck’s dog(?), and Amy Hwang’s snails. This week’s lead cartoon, by Liza Donnelly, is a direct nod to NYC’s shut-down (it features a none-too-pleased caged subway rat).

The high percentage of animals in the issue reminded me of this passage from Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker:

“Once, Geraghty [the magazine’s Art editor from 1939-1973] mentioned to me that the art department ‘bank’ contained a deplorably high number of jokes featuring conversations between animals. I proposed that the artwork of an entire issue of the magazine be devoted to talking-animal jokes, thus reducing the bank and just possibly causing our readers to lose their minds.  My proposal was accepted, the issue came out, and as far as the magazine could judge, the prank went largely unobserved.” 

Other Cartoons That Caught My Eye:

It seemed pre-ordained that Roz Chast would do a panic buying drawing. Love her (signed) photo drawing of “Der Bingle.” Mick Stevens’s me time drawing is a fine/fun piece of work; applause applause for the way Frank Cotham handled the damned in his splendid media attention drawing. I’ve no idea how Mr. Cotham’s cartoon is sized (I don’t have access to the digital edition yet) but this cartoon would certainly work beautifully on a half-page.  (Update, now that the digital issue is available:  Mr. Cotham’s drawing has been run a bit larger than most of the issue’s cartoons…not a half-page tho.)

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Without having the digital issue in front of me I’ve no idea if Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below), shown the door, and replaced by a redraw in the Spring of 2017, has finally returned.  Here’s more information on it.(Update: the redraw still appears. The classic remains in storage)

Behold the real deal!