Early Release! Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills…

The third early release New Yorker cover in a month — surely a sign of the times. With the news on overdrive these days I again urge the magazine to consider running an online Daily Cover much as they run a Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts.

In next week’s cover, Eric Drooker recalls the iconic (c.1930) photo of Grand Central by Hal Morey shown above. Read Francoise Mouly’s brief Q&A with Mr. Drooker here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Robert Leighton on dating and politics. Mr. Leighton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2002. Visit his website here.

 

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…From The Believer, March 19, 2020, “News Travels Fast: A Comic” by Ali Solomon. Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…Get away for awhile with this latest post from A New Yorker State Of Mind, March 18, 2020, “The End Of The World” — a look at The New Yorker issue of March 7, 1931. Good stuff, as always!

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Weighing whether to go out for some essentials today, I was reminded of a New Yorker drawing of mine from the issue of March 14, 2011…

Thurber Thursday (Personal History); Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills: Solomon, JAK

Thurber Thursday

When I moved to Greenwich Village in late 1977, renting an apartment on West 11th Street, I’d no idea how near I was living to the once home of James Thurber — the fellow whose work brought me to the big city. In the photo above (thanks Google!) the grey and yellow-paneled modern building all the way to the right at 65 West 11th Street, was the location of Thurber’s home in the late 1920s (1928, according to  Harrison Kinney’s excellent Thurber biography, James Thurber: His Life and Times, Henry Holt, 1995). Thurber and his wife moved to West 11th from their Horatio Street apartment [anyone have an address for Thurber’s Horatio apartment? Neither Kinney nor Bernstein’s biographies have it]. The building that housed Thurber’s apartment was replaced by the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in the late 1950s.

Just past the yellow school crossing sign, at the corner of 6th and West 11th, there was a magazine store. It was at that corner, back in April of 1977, that I opened the latest issue of The New Yorker to see my name listed for the first time. Quite a moment. My apartment was on the other side of 6th, a few doors past what once was (the fabulous) Ray’s Pizza (Ray’s was on the NW corner of 6th and West 11th, street level in the red brick building you see beyond the yellow school crossing sign).

Years later I came to learn how many New Yorker folks lived on West 11th.  Here’s a close-up of the street from the Ink Spill map of The New Yorker’s New York, posted in 2013. I had some sliver of interaction with all of these folks, except, of course, Thurber, and Ross, who died before I was born. Peter DeVries “fixed” one of my earliest captions (he was, at the time I began at the magazine, a caption doctor); I lived in the same building as Donald Barthelme, in the apartment just above his; courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I met, sat next to, and listened to Steinberg in the garden of the apartment building (as you see on the map snippet, he once actually lived in an apartment on the corner of 6th and West 11th); also courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I spent some time chatting with Grace Paley at a Barthelme party; walked past S.J. Perelman on Carmine Street, but was too afraid (or intimidated, or whatever) to introduce myself. Just walking past him was experience enough.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Adam Douglas Thompson on Waldo & distancing. Mr. Thompson began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2019

 

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…From Submittable, March 18, 2020, “5 Literary Cartoons By Ali Solomon” Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…From Believer Magazine, March 18, 2020, “The Coffee Isn’t Even Bitter: A Comic” by Jason Adam Katzenstein. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014.

The Weekend Spill: Unboxing A Box Of Steinbergs & Steigs; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 2-6, 2020; James Stevenson Documentary At Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest; More Spills…

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So often when I go on a hunt for something in the Spill‘s archives I come upon some other thing that takes me off onto another track. Today for instance, while poking around piles of boxes, I came across the box you see above.  Many years ago I filled the box with issues of The New Yorker bearing  Steinberg covers and Steig covers — then I stuck a label on the box and put the box on a shelf where it remained unopened for at least a decade, if not more. Today I opened the box and placed most of the issues out on a table.

Gems all! Maybe a dozen more issues didn’t make it into the photograph, but you get the idea. What I find interesting about this group is that I cannot remember why I bothered to gather these particular issues.

After photographing them, I put them all back in their beat-up box. I have plans to incorporate them into the loose issue New Yorker collection — but not today; maybe in 2030, when I come across the box again.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features this past week

The Daily Cartoon: Christopher Weyant, David Sipress, Ellis Rosen, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon.

Daily Shouts: Ward Sutton.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

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Sally Williams fab 2019 documentary Stevenson Lost & Found will be shown March 29th at The Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest. Info here.  Lucky you if you’re on the island and able to attend.

Mr. Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson was a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He was a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, published in 2013, is essential reading.  Sally Williams’ 2019 documentary film, Stevenson Lost & Found is essential viewing.

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…Just a few days ago while browsing through a bound volume of New Yorkers I came across a drawing by Ihrie Means (in the issue of May 14, 2007). Ms. Means name has now been added to the Spill‘s A-Z. My apologies for not adding her sooner.

…Work by Liz Montague, a newer addition to the New Yorker’s stable (March, 2019), is in (A Mini) Zine Fest, later this month.  Details here.

…The late great Syd Hoff‘s name came up in yesterday’s New York Times crossword puzzle: the clue (if that’s what it’s called — I’m not a crossword puzzler) was Cartoonist Hoff. 

Here’s Syd Hoff’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Syd Hoff ( Photo source: Esquire Cartoon album, 1957) Born 1912, New York City, died May 12, 2004, Miami Beach, Florida. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1975. Visit the Syd Hoff website here.

 

Cover Revealed! Harry Bliss & Steve Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons”; Searle’s 100th Celebrated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…And Yesterday’s)

And now there’s a cover for the Harry Bliss & Steve Martin collaborative cartoon collection. We’ll see it on sale November 17th (Celadon Books). The Spill first ran a piece about their New Yorker duo efforts back in March of 2019.

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Searle’s 100th Celebrated

Today marks the 100th birthday of the late great Ronald Searle, New Yorker cartoonist & cover artist. A Spill fave blog, Attempted Bloggery has been celebrating for weeks; see today’s post here. Also visit Perpetua, the Searle “tribute” blog.

Mr. Searle’s Spill A-Z entry:

Ronald Searle  Born, Cambridge, England March 3, 1920. Died, December 30, 2011, Draguignan, France. Steven Heller, who wrote Searle’s obit for The New York Times (Jan 4, 2012) said Searle’s “outlandishly witty illustrations for books, magazine covers, newspaper editorial pages and advertisements helped define postwar graphic humor…”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Elisabeth McNair on Purell & crime.

Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2017. Visit her website here.

…Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist: Ali Solomon on Super Tuesday.

Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A Whither Now? MAD Dartboard; The Online Tilley Watch: December 16 -20, 2019; From The Archives: 1984 “The New Yorker” Cartoonists Traveling Exhibit Poster

A Whither Now? MAD Dartboard

MAD was in the news not long ago when it announced it was no longer going to turn out a brand new content-filled magazine, but rely instead on reprinting older material.  Now the folks at MAD have (sort of) given its readers a game of choice. The below graphic piece appears in the February 2020 issue, along with the news that famed artist Al Jaffee will no longer do the fold-in back page after a gazillion years of doing so.

The Online Tilley Watch, December 16-20, 2019

An end of the week list of New Yorker artists* who contributed to newyorker.com features.

* artists contributing to newyorker.com are of two stripes: some contribute solely to the online magazine, and others cross-over from print to online.  For now, only the artists appearing in print are listed on the Spill‘s A-Z.

 

 

The Daily Cartoon: Ellis Rosen, Brooke Bourgeois, Ali Solomon, Avi Steinberg, Ellie Black.

Daily Shouts: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Ali Solomon.

and…

Instagram’s Favorite New Yorker Cartoons Of 2019…by The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.

Not-To-Be-Missed Shouts Of 2019…by The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

All of the above, and more, can be seen here.

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From The Archives: 1984 “The New Yorker” Cartoonists Traveling Exhibit Poster

I may, or may not, have posted this once before — if so, it was quite awhile ago. It’s a great at-a-glance look at The New Yorker‘s cartoon stable, mid 1980s (with a few departed stable mates work included:  Peter Arno, and R.Taylor, among them).