The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of September 24-28, 2018; Early Release Of Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; A Mystery Cartoonist; Three Cartoonists in Pennsylvania: Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons; The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons: Gender Studies

An atypical less specifically Trumpian Daily Cartoon week — although he hovers. The contributing cartoonists: Kim Warp, Ellis Rosen, Peter Kuper, and Emily Flake.

Daily Shouts contributing cartoonists: Amy Kurzweil with illustrations by Ellis Rosen, and Ali Fitzgerald.

You can see all the work here.

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Early Release Of Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

As happens from time-to-time, the magazine has early released its next cover. Here’s Ana Juan’s cover for next week’s issue, as well as a short piece about it.

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Mystery Cartoonist

Arnold Zwicky’s Blog, which concerns itself with cartoon language, has posted a cartoon by a mystery cartoonist:

 

If you’re able to identify the artist, please contact Mr. Zwicky through his site.

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Three Cartoonists In Pennsylvania

This Sunday, at the Milford Readers & Writers Festival:

11:30AM:-THREE NEW YORKER CARTOONISTS TALK ABOUT FUNNY:- New Yorker Cartoonists CHRISTOPHER WEYANT and DAVID BORCHART join cartoonist and media commentator BOB ECKSTEIN in a conversation about creating humor. There will be plenty of funny cartoons shown.

Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

Mr. Borchart began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

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Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” and “Simon” rate the the cartoons from the issue of October 1st.  P.C. Vey is awarded the CC‘s coveted “Top Toon” blue ribbon.  Read it all here.

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 The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons: Gender Studies

Above: two pages of the Index from Volume 1 of The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons

In his Foreword to The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick has this to say about gender equality in the ranks of New Yorker cartoonists:

Any cartoon compilation that draws from these archives makes it clear what a male preserve it was. 

And indeed, this encyclopedia reflects that in numbers of cartoons included by women. Of the advertised 3000 cartoons, 142 are by the 19 women represented. Simple math tells us that the remaining 2,858 cartoons are by men.  If you take Roz Chast’s 54 cartoons out of the 142, you’re left with 88 cartoons by 18 women. I emphasize again, as I did in the previous post about the encyclopedia, that this two volume set is not presented as an all-encompassing anthology representing the magazine’s past 93 years; there’s no expectation of some kind of balanced inclusion based on numbers of cartoons the artists contributed.  That isn’t what this encyclopedia is.

And yet, I did find myself hoping for more work by two major female contributors, Helen Hokinson and Barbara Shermund. They have a combined total of 6 cartoons in the encyclopedia. Ms. Shermund’s work appeared in The New Yorker just over 600 times (including 8 covers). I believe, if my numbers are correct she is the third most published female cartoonist in the magazine’s history. She is represented by 1 cartoon in the encyclopedia. Ms. Hokinson is in the top ten of the Spill‘s 23 member K Club (the group of cartoonists who have 1000 or more cartoons published in the New Yorker).  She is in fact, the most published female New Yorker artist in the magazine’s history with 1,796 cartoons and 68 covers. She is represented by 5 cartoons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Rea Irvin Exhibit Recalled; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Ali Fitzgerald Pencilled

What fun: my three favorite New Yorker cartoon-related sites are present and accounted for today.

 

 

More New Yorker art history from Attempted Bloggery, which has unearthed yet another New York Times piece — this time about the spectacular Rea Irvin, who left his fingerprints all over the magazine (and they’re still all over it). I was lucky enough to attend the Irvin exhibit that the Times covered. The Museum of the City of New York did a bang-up job.  I hope they or some other great New York cultural institution has an exhibit in mind for the New Yorker‘s 100th birthday in 2025 (it’s never too early to start planning!).  Here’s the Attempted Bloggery post.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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The online New Yorker cartoon critics, Max and Simon are back with a look at the drawings in the May 1st issue, which includes a rescued kitty, a couple of snakes, and a police lineup. Read it here. Oh, and the CC’s “Mystery Cartoonist” also makes a short but succinct appearance.

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Jane Mattimoe’s  wonderful Case For Pencils blog  is back with the spotlight on Ali Fitzgerald’s tools of the trade.  Ms. Fitzgerald’s work has appeared on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts. See the Pencils post here.

Link here for Ms. Fitzgerald’s website

 

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