The New Yorker’s First Football Cover…And A Few More

On this Super Bowl Sunday, thoughts turn to how football has intersected with my favorite magazine’s covers. Closing in on its fourth birthday,The New Yorker had run plenty of sports themed covers (baseball, tennis, horse racing, sculling, hockey…) but not anything football-related until I.G. Haupt‘s cover shown above. This was Mr. Haupt’s third cover for the magazine. He came on like gangbusters following his debut on the magazine’s September 3, 1927 issue — by year’s end, he’d had five. In all, there were forty-four Haupt covers, the last January 21, 1933.

The next football cover, published nearly a year later, was by an up and coming artist, Peter Arno (this was his eighth cover):

Looking through the magazine’s football covers you see a lot of huddles, like the Arno above and this one from the great Abe Birnbaum (which seems like an inspiration for a later cover):

Mr. Birnbaum was also the artist behind this somewhat unusual take from October 1950:

Here’s a great line of scrimmage cover by Harry Brown:

Finally, a personal favorite: this beauty by Alajolov, published in 1939:

The Tilley Watch, Monday, November 19, 2018

The Cover:

It’s not just the Technology issue this week, but also the Thanksgiving issue; Roz Chast’s cover blends the two.

  It got me thinking about New Yorker Thanksgiving covers of the past, and looking through them I found this one, by Alajalov from 1949. As with Ms. Chast’s cover, it blends the Thanksgiving table scenario with (then) relatively new household technology (the television set).  What a great cover!

Here’s Alajalov’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

Constantin Alajalov (above) Born Constantin Aladjalov, 1900, Rostov-on-the-Don, Russia. Died Oct., 1987, Amenia, New York. New Yorker work: 1926 -1960. Perhaps best known for his New Yorker covers ( he also supplied cover art to other publications). Key collection: Conversation Pieces (The Studio Publications Inc., 1942) w/ commentary by Janet Flanner.

Link here for a n Alajalov profile from The Saturday Evening Post.

The Cartoons:

16 cartoons.  22 illustrations, including 5 1/2 full page illustrations.

Robots abound in this issue (on the cover, in a cartoon, in an illustration).

Here are the cartoonists whose work appears in the issue…

Among them are two Thanksgiving drawings, one by P.C. Vey (also blending technology and Thanksgiving), and David Borchart, who gives us a wonderful (Macy’s?) parade drawing.  My only wish is that it was run larger.

Also of note in the issue: the debut appearance of Ali Solomon. Ms. Soloman is the 10th new cartoonist introduced this year, and the 22nd new cartoonist introduced since Emma Allen became the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Still missing: Rea Irvin’s iconic (not to mention beautiful) Talk masthead (read about it here).  Missing since the Spring of 2017 — this is what it looks like:

 

 

 

 

 

An Ink Spill Exclusive: Tom Toro’s 4 Page Playboy Spread; Attempted Bloggery, Past & Present; New Case For Pencils w/ Joana Avillez

An Ink Spill Exclusive: Tom Toro’s 4 Page Playboy Spread

Playboy‘s recently revived cartoon presence features Tom Toro in a big way, namely a four page spread in the July/August issue. Courtesy of Mr. Toro and Playboy, Ink Spill is pleased to show you the feature, “Travels With Toro” in its entirety (click on the work to enlarge): 

 

 

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Attempted Bloggery, Past & Present

Through the magic of Facebook or Twitter (can’t recall, and it’s not that important) I ran across mention of a three year old Attempted Bloggery post on the great artist Alajalov.  So, belatedly, here it is, from June 14, 2014: “Summing Up Constantin Alajalov”

(pictured left: Mr. Alajalov)

…and posted more  recently  this interesting Attempted Bloggery piece about Ray Rohn, a  New Yorker cover artist with one cover to his credit. “Ray Rohn: A Portrait of a Serviceman”

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A New Case For Pencils with Daily Shouts artist, Joana Avillez

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils is up, with this look at Joana Avillez‘s tools of the trade.  Ms. Avillez’s work has been seen on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts as well as in print on Shouts & Murmurs.

See it here!

The New Yorker before Addams, Steig and Steinberg

NY-albums

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the release this past week of The New Yorker’s Cartoons of the Year 2013 (a relative of a long line of New Yorker Albums seen in the photo) I thought it would be fun to leaf through The New Yorker‘s very first collection, simply called The New Yorker Album. published in 1928, just three years after the magazine’s debut. For starters, I love this part of the introduction (authored by “The New Yorker”):

The New Yorker has been dealing with artists for upward of three years.  We are tired but happy.  Our artists, we feel, have been worth the trouble. They have taken the electric and protoplasmic and comic town and reduced it to page size. To be merry and wise and subtle every week is scarcely possible; but there have been good weeks.

If you substitute the “upward of three years” to “upward of eighty-eight years” the excerpt could’ve easily introduced the 2013 collection.

The very first cartoon you run into in the 1928 collection is a full page by Peter Arno.  This makes perfect sense as Arno was, just  three years into the New Yorker’s life, already its star (his co-star was Helen Hokinson).  Arno was fond of the full page cartoon, but paging through the Album, you’ll find he had plenty of company in that department. Ms. Hokinson, Rea Irvin, Gluyas Williams, George Shanks, Al Frueh, Gardner Rea, and Reginald Marsh, to name but a few, all worked well on a full page (you’ll find a number of full page cartoons in the 2013 collection, but none originally ran as such; full page cartoons in the modern New Yorker are rare, with Roz Chast’s work being one of the exceptions.

What might be remarkable to anyone looking through the 1928 Album is the absence of plenty of the marquee names we associate with the magazine’s past. Cartoonists such as  Charles Addams, William Steig, Saul Steinberg, Thurber and George Price had yet to begin contributing drawings to the magazine (Thurber had begun contributing his writing in 1927, but The New Yorker’s founder & first editor, Harold Ross, wouldn’t publish a Thurber drawing in the magazine until 1931). Addams’ work didn’t appear until 1933, Steig’s not until 1935, Steinberg’s not until 1941, George Price’s not until 1932.  The Album of 1928 was a blueprint for what was to come in later years on the magazine’s pages: a variety of styles, of cartoon worlds, beautifully co-existing.

Much as the 2013 collection is heavy on a handful of cartoonists, such was the case in 1928.  The aforementioned Hokinson, Irvin, Rea, Frueh and Arno command the most space, with plenty of full pages.  Alan Dunn and Barbara Shermund’s work is everywhere, but mostly half-page or quarter-page. Work by other familiar names (or soon to be familiar names) are sprinkled about the volume.  There’s a single Mary Petty drawing (if my counting is correct) with healthier showings by, among others, Otto Soglow, Perry Barlow, Leonard Dove, Peggy Bacon, John Held, Jr., Alajalov (still spelled “Aladjalov”), I. Klein, Carl Rose and Garrett Price (in an early style, far less fluid than his later work). There are a few spreads in the Album (unlike the spreads in the 2013 Cartoons of the Year,  which were created specifically for that publication, the 1928 spreads ran in the The New Yorker).

What struck me as I looked back and forth between the 1928 collection and the 2013 collection (much as a spectator watches the ball during a tennis match) is that here we are eighty-eight years after the magazine’s debut,  still highly entertained, and yes, sometimes still puzzled, by the very simple format Harold Ross and company fostered and nurtured: a drawing atop a caption.  Every week we continue to dive into each issue, turning the pages, eager to run into the next cartoon (and lately, the Cartoon Caption Contest cartoon).  As someone commented on this site following a post on the Cartoons of the Year, “Can’t wait for the shiny new cartoons of 2014.”   Me neither. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoons & war

Pictured above:  a handful of World War II era publications from The New Yorker. Beginning at twelve o’clock high, with the red cover is The New Yorker Cartoons with The Talk of The Town (1945) — it’s the hard cover version of the New Yorker booklet to the left (cover by Alajalov). This is an exciting publication, chock full of great work.  The Introduction is by New Yorker writer Russell Maloney who speaks of the qualities that define a New Yorker cartoon.  Here’s an excerpt:

The editors of The New Yorker have, from the very beginning, made things just much more difficult for themselves by insisting on a closer relation between pictures and captions. In a good New Yorker drawing — and mind you, I’m saying they’re all good — the picture doesn’t mean much without a caption, and vice versa. If a picture is self explanatory without a caption, it is printed without a caption; you’ll find a good many in this volume. In The New Yorker the pictures do not illustrate the jokes; they are the jokes.


Continuing clockwise is The New Yorker War Album (cover by Peter Arno, published by Random House, 1942), then a pony edition* New Yorker (cover by Helen Hokinson), Another booklet, this one titled The New Yorker War Cartoons (cover by the ultra-prolific Alan Dunn).  The Introduction is by E.J. Kahn.  Here’s an excerpt:

 

One of the principal virtues of this collection of war cartoons is that they are not aimed at anybody in particular, unless it be the man with a capacity for absorbtion of humor…These cartoons show that a purely civilian organization can good naturedly tickle a military body without hurting any feelings.


Rounding out the collection, another pony edition (cover by James Thurber).

 

*By following the pony edition link above you’ll be taken to the From the Attic section of Ink Spill.  Scroll down to the “New Yorker Overseas 1945” post for a brief history of the The New Yorker Pony Editions