Event of Note: Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer in Conversation, Oct. 20th; More Spills: Al Frueh’s Studio and Paul Noth’s Book News

sorel_feifferCartoon gods Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer will be in conversation on October 20th at the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia.  Mark your calendar!  Details here.

Mr. Sorel’s latest book, Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 is due this October while Mr. Feiffer’s latest, Cousin Joseph, is just out. Both are published by Liveright. 9781631490231_300

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More Spills Icon EditedPaul Noth has signed up for three books with Bloomsbury.  Writing on Facebook about the news, Mr. Noth said: “They’re my favorite thing I’ve ever done.”

And here’s what Publisher’s Weekly had to say:

 

 The illustrated adventure series features Happy Junior, a bearded 10-year-old who wants to be normal but can’t, thanks to his family, including his father, a brilliant inventor whose screwball products are trumpeted in TV infomercials, his five unusual sisters, and his despotic grandmother who has relegated the whole family to a basement corner of her grand estate. The first book in the series, How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens, will be published in winter 2018…

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And from out of left field, this real estate listing for a Greenwich Village townhouse (34 Perry Street) that includes a mention of Al Frueh, who had the first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker.

*New Yorker Minutiae Recollection Award of the year goes to Stephen Nadler, who runs the wonderfully entertaining and informative Attempted Bloggery.  Stephen wrote to me after reading this post and pointed out that this very same studio  was mentioned in that very same inaugural issue under the heading In Our Midst. And here it is:

NYer Frueh

 

 

 

From the realtor’s listing:”The fourth floor is exceptional. In 1924, it was transformed into a loft and artist studio by renowned New Yorker cartoonist Mr. Al Frueh with a raised roof and extraordinary large windows and north facing skylight across the entire frontage.”


Al Frueh's studio

 

 

 

In the House: Curtain Calls of 1926

Curtain Calls of 1926This wonderful  book arrived in today’s mail. I was very lucky to find it for the price of a couple of slices of pizza (with toppings).  According to an online bookseller’s listing there were 40 copies produced. It’s a small book, 8 1/2″ high, 6″ wide.  I’d only seen one before, years ago in a museum case. If I’ve had a Holy Grail of New Yorker books, I suppose this would be it (until something else comes along I’ve never seen before).

The title page includes this note:

“..limited edition for the enjoyment of a few appreciative friends

 

Inside are a number of pieces, including  Dorothy Parker’s “Dialogue At Three in The Morning” as well as Corey Ford’s “Anniversary of a Great Magazine: Looking Back Over the Vast History of The New Yorker with Mr. Eustace Tilley” (we have Mr. Ford to thank for the name “Eustace Tilley”).   There are drawings by Helen Hokinson, John Held, jr., Peter Arno (his Whoops Sisters), a full page by Gluyas Williams, and a full page by Rea Irvin as well as an Al Frueh caricature of Al Smith, a McNerney drawing, and so much more. The cover is, of course, by Rea Irvin

 

Gehr’s latest Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist Interview: Edward Koren; Donnelly on Navasky’s “Art of Controversy”; Article of Interest: Al Frueh

 

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From The Comics Journal, June 12, 2013, “The Beastly Beatitudes of Edward Koren” — this latest entry by Richard Gehr in his series, “Know Your New Yorker Cartoonist”

 

 

 

 

 

 

And…

From Forbes.com, June 12, 2013, “Women and the Art of Controversy”Liza Donnelly reviews Victor Navasky’s new book.

 

From limaohio.com, September 12, 2012, “Just Al: Frueh made it big but stayed humble”

 

 

Almost everyone’s familiar with The New Yorker’s first cover, Rea Irvin’s dandy with the top hat, later dubbed  Eustace Tilley.  But how many of us know who did the second cover? SYK4mI4-xwzbsTSbbLvPNr3ocr-yFiskgF_taE1WVmH-14aFAjmnSaboPpILHuVLVu4ERcgv1IlObybjAWx1RVTQNL-sxsqTXLHaYwDyS4SlOoubUYYtBZlkUPn7ZzpBpWYnsg6SXQyTchzAlenPYdk=s120-c Here’s a capsule bio of the great Al Frueh, who not only was a cartoonist and cover artist, but an illustrator who carved out a spectacular niche for himself doing the caricatures that accompanied the New Yorker’s Theater reviews.

 

Happy Birthday, Eustace!

 

In honor of the very first issue of The New Yorker, dated February 21, 1925, I’m re-posting a photo I took for “Tilley Over Time a piece I contributed to newyorker.com back in February 21, 2008.

The cartoonists appearing in that first issue were Alfred Frueh, Gardner Rea, Oscar Howard, Wallace Morgan, Ethel Plummer and, on page 14,  an unknown cartoonist, whose drawing is titled Flor de Pince Nez. (you can find some brief biographical material on all of these cartoonists here). Below is the work of the unidentified cartoonist. If anyone can ID the artist, please contact me.

 

And finally, a big big round of applause for Rea Irvin, who brought us Eustace Tilley, and three cheers for Harold Ross, without whom…