Liza Donnelly At The 31st Festival National Des Humoristes; Profile Of Interest: Al Frueh; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Liza Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker 40 years ago this year, will be at the 31st Festival National des Humoristes in Tours this coming week. Ms. Donnelly’s poster for the festival appears above.

Here’s the info, in English, on Ms. Donnelly  from the Festival’s website:

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Profile Of Interest: Al Frueh

Here’s a short but informative profile by Alex Jay of Al Frueh ( Frueh is pronounced “free”) from Stripper’s Guide.

Mr. Frueh, contributed to The New Yorker from its very first issue. His first cover was the magazine’s second cover (shown above).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Tim Hamilton (lately riding a Daily roll) on Trump

Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015. Visit his website here.

 

Playful Pages; Early Gahan Wilson Art; Yesterday’s and Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon

Playful Pages

On many a Monday Tilley Watch I mention placement of art. Usually I’m talking about how large a drawing appears on the page, and where it sits. I’m fairly certain I’ve also mentioned how the art once played across the pages of The New Yorker, creatively interacting with text.  While randomly (electronically) flipping through elder issues of The New Yorker this morning I happened upon some examples.  The first one (by Al Frueh) is especially striking:

Below: Julian de Miskey, February 6, 1926.

Below: JTI, November 6, 1926.

Below: unsigned, November 24, 1928

Below: Leonard Dove, on the left and Rea Irvin on the right, November 24, 1928.

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Early Gahan Wilson

If you head over to Mike Lynch’s blog you’ll see, courtesy of Dick Buchanan, a great selection of early Gahan Wilson art.  And be sure to link to the Gahan Wilson GoFundMe campaign that’s in progress Mr. Wilson, one of the New Yorker cartoon gods,  is suffering from severe dementia. 

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Today’s Daily

Yesterday’s Daily cartoon was a duo effort: Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley.  Today’s cartoon is by Emily Flake.

Jason Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017, Emily Flake in 2008.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker March 18, 2019

The Cover: This is Malika Favre’s seventh cover for The New Yorker (according to the Contributors info on page 4). An exceptionally decorative cover for “The Style Issue”… Read more here

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A very Charles Addamsy David Sipress drawing this week (that’s a compliment, of course).

Cartoon placement on the page has been mentioned here numerous times: happy to say that seven (i.e., half) of the  cartoons in the issue were given breathing room. They look great.

Tom Cheney’s Hell’s Auditors cartoon especially caught my eye (it’s on page 29). I believe that this is the fourth time New Yorker cartoonists have specifically word-played with the Hell’s Angels “colors.” Jack Ziegler had two, this beauty, published in The New Yorker, February 27, 1989:

And an earlier one, published in The New Yorker, December 17, 1984:

And then there was this one by yours truly in the December 25th, 1995 issue of The New Yorker:

A quick search of The New Yorker‘s database shows over a hundred of its cartoons have incorporated a motorcycle.  Sometimes the bike and biker are bit players, and other times they’re the focus of the drawing.  An awful lot of the cartoons concern folks getting speeding tickets from a motorcycle cop (and many of them show the cop in-wait behind a billboard). 

There are a small number of cartoons with motorcyclists wearing colors, but the usage doesn’t include mention of the Hell’s Angels. Ed Arno’s motorcycle gang wearing jackets that read “Inflation Fighters” (published April 2, 1979) is one example. 

To return to the great Jack Ziegler for a moment, he used the Hell’s Angels colors once again, but left their name intact in this fabulous drawing published in The New Yorker, November 13, 2000:

A long long way from the subject of Hell’s Angels, for those interested in trivia: the first mention of a motorcycle cartoon in the New Yorker‘s database is Al Frueh’s cartoon in the February 13, 1926 issue.  The  second cartoon with a motorcycle in the picture was published December 7, 1929.  It set off a bit of a in-house squabble, but that’s a story for another time (the artist was Peter Arno).

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Lastly, still no sight of Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. Read about it here, and see it below:

 

Fave Book Find of the Week: Frueh On The Theatre: 1906 – 1962; Sam Marlow Pencilled; New Yorker Cartoonists in Life & Judge; Signed By The Cartoonist; Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker!

Here’s a wonderful collection of the late great Al Frueh’s theater work for The New Yorker and elsewhere. The New York Times had Al Hirschfeld, The New Yorker had Al Frueh.  Mr. Frueh’s New Yorker colleague, Brendan Gill provides an informative and insightful intro. For more on Mr. Frueh, here’s a Spill piece about him, “The First New Yorker Cartoon” — posted way back in 2011.

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Sam Marlow Pencilled

Sam Marlow, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker May 9, 2016 is the latest subject of Jane Mattimoe’s splendid Case For Pencils blog.  See Mr. Marlow’s tools of the trade here.

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Buchanan’s Files Continue on Mike Lynch’s Site

If New Yorker cartoonists work not published in the New Yorker is your thing, then head on over to Mike Lynch’s site where you’ll find a number of Life and Judge cartoons from the 1930s. All the scans courtesy of Dick Buchanan, including the Ned Hilton drawing above (Life, 1935). Mr. Hilton’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from May 19, 1934 — June 15, 1957.

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Signed By The Cartoonist

Stephen Nagler’s Attempted Bloggery site has been posting signed books by some famous cartoonists, Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, and William Steig among them.  Check them out here.

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Reading Every New Yorker

And speaking of Ms. Hokinson, here’s her beautiful New Yorker cover from the summer of 1928.  The fascinating blog, A New Yorker State of Mind takes a very close look within.  Read it here.

Two Blog Posts of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind & Attempted Bloggery

Two favorite New Yorker-related blogs making for fun Saturday reading.

First, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker with its look at the issue of June 30, 1928 featuring the ever pleasing work of Helen Hokinson on the cover. Work shown in the post: Alice Harvey, Al Frueh, and Peter Arno. 

And then there’s Attempted Bloggery, frequently mentioned on the Spill, and for good reason. Stephen Nadler, who runs the site, tirelessly examines all kinds of New Yorker cartoon and cartoonist related angles (original art, auctions, obscurities, etc). Right now he’s looking at the work of Gregory d’Alessio, a somewhat forgotten figure.  Mr. d’Alessio contributed a handful of covers and one cartoon to The New Yorker

Shown above: on the left is the June 30, 1928 New Yorker. On the right, a drawing by Mr. d’Alessio from the May 1937 issue of College Humor.

The Spill’s A-Z entries for cartoonists mentioned:

Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

Gregory d’Alessio (Photo above from College Humor, 1938) Born Sept. 25, 1904, NYC. New Yorker work: 1934 -1940.

Al Frueh (pictured above) Born, Lima, Ohio 1880; died, Sharon, Connecticut, 1968. New Yorker work: 1925 – 1962. Here’s a good piece about Mr. Frueh’s life.

 

 

 

Alice Harvey  (above) Born 1894, Austin, Illinois. New Yorker work: Oct. 17th,1925 – May 1, 1943.

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)