The Tilley Watch Online for the Week of July 30 – August 3, 2018; Cartoonists Ask Questions

 Trump (or in the realm of Trump) still dominating this weeks Daily Cartoon. The final Daily of the week was corporate. The contributing cartoonists: Brendan Loper (twice), David Sipress, Peter Kuper, and Jon Adams.

Over on Daily Shouts, zippo contributing New Yorker cartoonists this week.

To see all of the above, and more, link here.

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Cartoonists Ask Questions

Jane Mattimoe has begun a new branch of her long-running blog A Case For Pencils: cartoonists asking questions.  Go here to see who’s asked what.

 

 

Chatfield Pencilled; From Dick Buchanan’s Files: Work by Gardner Rea; Splat! New Yorker Reveals Its Next Cover; Even More Cartoons; New Yorker Union Certified

Chatfield Pencilled

Jason Chatfield is up next on A Case For Pencils, Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog wherein New Yorker cartoonists show us their tools of the trade.  Read it here!

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 From Dick Buchanan’s files via Mike Lynch: Gardner Rea

Mike Lynch has posted another bevy of cartoons from Dick Buchanan’s Files.  This time it’s work from the underappreciated Gardner Rea.  See it all here

Here’s Mr. Rea’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Gardner Rea (self portrait above from Collier’s Collects Its Wits. Photo from Rea’s NYTs obit, 1966.) Born, Ironton, Ohio 1892. Died, 1966. Collections: The Gentleman Says It’s Pixies / Collier’s Cartoons by Gardner Rea (Robert McBride & Co. 1944), Gardner Rea’s Sideshow (Robert McBride & Co, 1945). New Yorker work: 1st issue (February 21, 1925) – 1965.

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Splat! New Yorker Reveals Its Next Cover

Barry Blitt talks to Francoise Mouly about his cover (above) for next week’s issue. And here’s a Washington Post piece about it.

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Even More Cartoons

 12 more pages, showing 18 more cartoons have been released by the publisher of the upcoming (October) New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons. See them here on the book’s Amazon listing.

With 3000 images promised, we’ve been shown a total of 25.  Only 2975 to go!

Note to tote bag afficionadoes: If you preorder either the $800.00 deluxe edition or the not-deluxe $100.00 edition, you’ll receive a tote bag.

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New Yorker Union Certified

The News Guild of New York posted this photo on Twitter congratulating the New Yorker Union’s certification. Keen-eyed observers will note a portion of James Thurber’s wall drawings on the extreme right. The drawings have moved with the magazine since it left its second home at 25 West 43rd Street in 1991.

This is what the drawings look like without company :

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit of Interest: “Funny Ladies At The New Yorker: Then and Now” at The Society of Illustrators; Fave Photo of the Day: Sam Gross & Bob Eckstein; Case For Pencils Follows-Up on Roz Chast’s Search For a Pen; Profile of Interest: Emma Hunsinger

Exhibit of Interest: “Funny Ladies at The New Yorker: Then and Now” at The Society of Illustrators

Something to look forward to mid-summer! The Society of Illustrators will exhibit a survey of the women cartoonists of The New Yorker, as well as a panel discussion you won’t want to miss,  moderated by the show’s curator, Liza Donnelly.  Some info here, with more to follow. Drawing above by the great Nurit Karlin.

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Fave Photo of the Day: the incomparable Sam Gross with the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert, Bob Eckstein, looking over sketches at the New Yorker‘s art department.  My thanks to  The Surreal McCoy for use of her photo.

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Case For Pencils Follows-up on Roz Chast’s Search For a Pen

Ms. Chast asked for pen suggestions.  Case For Pencil readers responded.  Read here.

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Profile of Interest: Emma Hunsinger

From Wake Forest Magazine, June 14, 2018, “So You Want To Be In The New Yorker?” — this profile of one of the newer New Yorker contributors, Emma Hunsinger (her first cartoon appeared in the issue of November 27, 2017).

 (photo by Peri Hofmann)

 

Victoria Roberts Pencilled; Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art; Seth’s Commencement Address; Philip Roth Jaywalking on West 79th St.

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils returns with a look at Victoria Roberts’ tools of the trade. See it here!

Ms. Roberts began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

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Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art

This week Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery looks at items acquired at the MoCCA Fest.  Today it’s John Cuneo‘s Not Waving But Drawing. Read it here. Above right: Mr. Cuneo’s most recent New Yorker cover.

Photo above: Mr. Cuneo in the foreground seated next to Anelle Miller, the Director of The Society of Illustrators.  In the back, from left to right: Cartoonist Felipe Galindo, Stephen Nadler, and cartoonist Marc Bilgrey  (photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly).

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Seth’s Commencement Address

From The Comics Journal, May 22, 2018, “Seth’s 2018 Center For Cartoon Studies Commencement Speech” — read the entire address here.

Seth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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A Split-Second Encounter With Philip Roth

Back in the Fall of 2014, driving on Columbus Avenue, I made a right turn onto West 79th Street. As my wife and I once had an apartment on 79th I often made a point of driving past the address on the way back upstate. For some reason on this particular day, after rounding the corner, and well short of our old apartment building, I immediately pulled over on the north side of the street and illegally parked for a moment. Just then a taxi pulled right in front of me, and parked. The right side back door of the taxi opened and a fellow holding a cane gingerly got out. He started to make his way to the rear of the cab and then began to negotiate between the cab’s rear bumper and my front bumper. I wanted the guy to know I wasn’t going to move my car while he was there — a simple courtesy — so I looked right at him, and he looked right at me (I suppose to make sure I wasn’t going to move my car): it was Philip Roth. I waited til he’d crossed diagonally southwest on 79th before taking the picture you see above.  A nice split-second encounter with a favorite writer. 

 

 

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery; Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross

Yesterday Jane Mattimoe gave us an audio snippet of her recent interview with the great Sam Gross.  Today we get the whole print interview right here.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC”s “Max” and “Simon” return with their up-close takes on each and every cartoon in the new issue (y’know, the issue with the brain on the cover).  Read it all here.

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Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Above is just a sample.  To see more, go to Stephen Nadler’s wonderful blog here.

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Finally, it was exactly one year ago today that we lost Jack Ziegler, one of the New Yorker‘s cartoon gods. I’m posting something I wrote, in tribute, shortly after he passed away. It has never been published til now.

Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

The New Yorker hadn’t seen anyone like Jack Ziegler – or more precisely, like Jack Ziegler’s cartoons — when he began submitting his work in the early 1970s. The craziest art the magazine had allowed in was perhaps Edward Koren’s furry, or fuzzy creatures, and of course, Saul Steinberg’s figurative flights of fancy.  Jack brought in a completely different bag of tricks filled with a sensibility borne out of the Mad magazine school of art, but with a firm grasp of New Yorker art history in mind.  He knew what he was doing, and in the great tradition of the magazine’s best artists, he was doing it for himself, to amuse himself. He was not trying to be like a New Yorker cartoonist; he was doing Jack Ziegler cartoons that he wanted to see published in the New Yorker.

His cartoon-like sensibility found hilarity in, most famously, hamburgers and toasters, and, of course, human beings. For Jack, the backyard hibachi was turned into a shrine-like thing of beauty in a Mt. Rushmore like setting complete with Japanese inspired cloud-work.  The regular guy he added to many of his drawings – he called him his “onlooker”  — was always slightly surprised to find himself looking at, say, an enormous hamburger on a beach. I imagine the onlooker was actually Jack, within his own world, not particularly shocked, but accepting of whatever freaky thing he’d come upon in a given cartoon panel.

Jack’s world was a calmly zany world, gleefully shared with all of us.  His work was like the man himself: calmly zany.  He had a wonderful little burst of  laughter when it occurred to him that one of life’s little moments was hysterical. He recognized so many of them in these past forty-three years.  Here’s to sinister Mr. Coffee machines, and giant toasters, and sensitive cowboys, and superheroes losing their shorts, mid-air!