The Weekend Spill: A Booth Exhibit; New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry; Events Of Interest With Liana Finck; The Tilley Watch Online For August 19-23, 2019

A Booth Exhibit

There’s a brand new George Booth exhibit up and running at Gallery North out on Long Island. All the info here.

George Booth’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth (photo taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry

Trump + Golf + Greenland,  courtesy of Mr. Blitt.

See it here.

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

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Events of Interest With Liana Finck

Tis nearing the season for promotional events tied-in to Liana Finck’s upcoming collection, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self, due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks. Brooklyn’s Books Are Magic will host an event on October 3rd (scroll down to October 3rd), and The Commonwealth Club (out in San Fran) will hold an event on October 14th.

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

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A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts during the past week (August 19 -23)

The Daily Cartoon:

Farley Katz, Tim Hamilton (twice), Jeremy Nguyen, and Mark Thompson.

Daily Shouts: “Achievable Ways To Feel Accomplished” by Julia Edelman and Ginny Hogan. Illustrated by Will McPhail; “Larson’s Guide To Odd Birds Of New York City” by Maggie Larson.

All these and more can be found here.

Celebrating Sam Gross’s 50th New Yorker Anniversary

The most recent Sam Gross cartoon in The New Yorker appeared August 5th, 2019.  Mr. Gross’s very first New Yorker cartoon appeared August 23, 1969. Do the math and you’ll find we are in the year, month, and exact day of Mr. Gross’s New Yorker golden anniversary. With today being the date of publication of his debut New Yorker cartoon, I thought I’d check in with Mr. Gross and ask him about that very first sale to the magazine. My call caught him during his morning exercise routine, but he was gracious enough to pause and chat with me for a few minutes.

When I asked him if he recalled the moment when he learned he’d sold to the magazine, he replied, as I knew he would, “Of course I do.” I haven’t met a cartoonist yet who doesn’t remember their first OK (“OK” is New Yorker cartoon lingo for a sold cartoon); in this cartoon world, that moment is a life-changer.  Before telling me of his first OK, he said that he’d actually been selling ideas to The New Yorker for Charles Addams since about 1963. He also sold an idea for Otto Soglow, of Little King fame, but mostly the ideas were for Addams.

And now the story:

It begins with a lunch that included the renowned French artist J.J. Sempe. Mr. Sempe, not yet a New Yorker contributor, had come to town to do a piece on behalf of L’Express.  While in the city, Mr. Sempe was asked to lunch with James Geraghty, then The New Yorker‘s art editor. Mr. Geraghty was interested in having Mr. Sempe submit work to The New Yorker. Originally, Mr. Geraghty’s art assistant, Barbara Nicholls, was to accompany them to lunch as the interpreter, but she had to cancel. In her stead Mr. Geraghty asked the multi-lingual cartoonist Peter Porges to come along. Mr. Porges told Mr. Geraghty he would only go if his friend, Mr. Gross could accompany him.

And so, at lunch, Mr. Gross found himself seated to the left of Mr. Geraghty. Mr. Geraghty asked Mr. Porges to ask Sempe if he would submit work to The New Yorker.  Sempe, through Mr. Porges, replied “he says he’s too busy — has too much work to do.”  Mr. Geraghty then asked Mr. Porges to ask Sempe “if he would consider submitting rejects.”  To which Sempe replied, through Mr. Porges, “What are rejects.”

Shortly, after sipping some wine, Mr. Geraghty leaned over to Mr. Gross (also drinking wine) and said, “Instead of buying the idea [of a recent submission by Mr. Gross] we’re going to buy the whole drawing.” And Mr. Gross replied, “That’s great, thanks.”  Mr. Gross went on to say, “And then, after Geraghty had had another glass of wine, and I had had another glass of wine, he leaned over and said, ‘Oh, and we’re going to buy another one too.'” 

Above: The first Sam Gross New Yorker cartoon

Mr. Gross had heard from Mr. Porges that Mr. Geraghty would “drive cartoonists crazy” with editorial changes to cartoons. Back at the New Yorker’s art department following lunch, Mr. Geraghty handed Mr. Gross the rough drawings of the two bought cartoons [most cartoonists submit “rough” drawings.  If bought, the cartoonist will then do a “finish” — the drawing that will be published].  Mr. Gross tells us what happened next:

“So with that particular drawing [the first published cartoon], he gave me the drawing, and I stood there with it, and said,I’m not going, Mr. Geraghty until you specifically tell me what you want in the drawing.’ So he said, ‘put the kid here, dispense with the awning’ and he was very specific on what I had to do.  Afterwards, with all the other drawings I sold, I never had any problem with him. Every time I sold something he told me exactly what he wanted.” 

I said to Mr. Gross, “That’s a big deal, selling two your first time.” to which Mr. Gross replied, “I can credit the wine for it.”

So here’s to one of The New Yorker‘s cartoon giants. It is quite a feat to sell just one drawing to The New Yorker.  To continue on for fifty years (and counting) is another kind of feat. Mr. Gross is one of a select group of cartoonists with a thumbprint style — i.e., no one else has drawn like him, and he draws like no one else (true, as well, of George Booth, also celebrating his New Yorker golden anniversary this year). Feeling in a oh-what-the-hell Grossian spirit, I’ll say too that no other cartoonist even comes close to thinking like him.

 

Further reading:

For an extended interview with Mr. Gross I highly recommend Richard Gehr’s I Only Read It For The Cartoons, published in 2014, by New Harvest. Mr. Gross is one of a dozen New Yorker cartoonists interviewed.

If you want to listen to Sam Gross being interviewed, there’s this wonderful podcast from Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories Show.

All of Mr. Gross’s cartoon anthologies are must-haves in any cartoon library.  A quartet of them are shown:

An Elephant Is Soft And Mushy (Dodd, Mead & Co. , 1980)

More Gross (Congdon & Weed, 1982)

I Am Blind And My Dog Is Dead (Dodd, Mead & Co., 1977.  Reissued by Harry N. Abrams, 2007)

No More Mr. Nice Guy (Perigee, 1987)

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly At The 31st Festival National Des Humoristes; Profile Of Interest: Al Frueh; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Liza Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker 40 years ago this year, will be at the 31st Festival National des Humoristes in Tours this coming week. Ms. Donnelly’s poster for the festival appears above.

Here’s the info, in English, on Ms. Donnelly  from the Festival’s website:

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Profile Of Interest: Al Frueh

Here’s a short but informative profile by Alex Jay of Al Frueh ( Frueh is pronounced “free”) from Stripper’s Guide.

Mr. Frueh, contributed to The New Yorker from its very first issue. His first cover was the magazine’s second cover (shown above).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Tim Hamilton (lately riding a Daily roll) on Trump

Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015. Visit his website here.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: A Barry Blitt Interview I Missed

Jeremy Nguyen on Spiderman. Mr. Nguyen has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

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A Barry Blitt Interview I Missed

Luckily the Design Observer just brought this Barry Blitt interview out of their archive and re-posted it.  I missed it when it was originally posted in December of 2017.  And lucky forThe Spill, it caught the eye (and ear) of a friend who’s in the design biz up Beantown way  — I thank him for it.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; A Q&A With Bob Eckstein; Spiegelman, Marvel, and the “Orange Skull”

A Back to school  Daily by Mark Thompson. Mr. Thompson began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.

Tim Hamilton delivered yesterday’s very Planet of the Apes-ish Daily. Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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A Q&A With Bob Eckstein

A short Q&A marking Bob Eckstein’s return to the Annual Writer’s Digest Conference.  Read it here.

Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  He is, among many other things, the world’s greatest snowman expert.  Visit his website here.

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 Spiegelman, Marvel, and the “Orange Skull”


Art Spiegelman of Maus fame (and a former contributor to The New Yorker) is in the news again. Read all about it here on Bado’s Blog and in The Guardian.