Ken Krimstein’s New York Times Book Review Sketchbook; Exhibit Of Interest: Felipe Galindo’s ‘Washington Takes Manhattan’; The Tilley Watch Online

Ken Krimstein’s New York Times Book Review Sketchbook

From The New York Times Book Review, May 12, 2019, “How Questioning Hannah Arendt Made Me Question Myself”

Mr. Krimstein on writing his latest book,The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth Mr. Krimstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.  Visit his website here.

 

 

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Exhibit of Interest: Felipe Galindo’s ‘Washington Takes Manhattan’

An exhibit of work at the Morris Jumel Mansion by Felipe Galindo (aka feggo), who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002. Visit his website here.

 

 

 

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A round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com

The Daily Cartoon: Tim Hamilton, Peter Kuper, Tom Chitty, Avi Steinberg, and Teresa Burns Parkhurst. Not one, but two castle drawings this week!

To see all the above and more go here.

 

Video Of Interest: Amy Hwang’s TedX Yale Talk; Interview Of Interest: Caitlin Cass; John Donohue’s All The Restaurants In New York Launch; Book Event Of Interest With Bob Eckstein, Roz Chast, Robert Leighton, and Bruce Eric Kaplan; Article Of Interest: Seth; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Tim Hamilton

Video Of Interest: Amy Hwang’s TedX Yale Talk

 

Watch Amy Hwang’s recent TedX Yale talk, “How To Make A Decision That Could Ruin Your Life”

Ms. Hwang began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.  Visit her website here.

Left : an Amy Hwang New Yorker drawing from January 30, 2017.

 

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Interview Of Interest: Caitlin Cass

From The Beat,May 9, 2019, “The TCAF 209 Interviews: Caitlin Cass On The Great Moments Of Western Civilization & The Suffrage Movement” 

Ms. Cass began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. Visit her website here.

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John Donohue’s Book Event

A reminder: John Donohue will celebrate the publication of All The Restaurants In New York on May 16th at the Powerhouse arena. All the info here.

Mr. Donohue began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 2004. He is also a former editor of  The New Yorker’s Goings On About Town section. 

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Book Event Of Interest: Eckstein, Kaplan, Leighton, and Chast

Bob Eckstein, who edited the recent anthology, The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons has posted the below notice:

Link here to The Grolier Club website.

Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007; Ms. Chast in 1978; Mr. Leighton in 2002; Mr. Kaplan in 1991.

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Article Of Interest

An interesting article on Seth (Gregory Gallant) from The Welland Tribune. Seth began contributing covers to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Trump the spoiler courtesy of  Tim Hamilton (above) who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

 

A Spill Push Back On Mankoff’s “It’s A Young Person’s Game”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper

The below fraction of a lengthy interview, “Motoring With Bob Mankoff” on Peter McGraw’s May 2019 blog, caught my attention (to see the entire interview, go here):

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Peter McGraw: Tell me about your day, tell me about your creative process. How do you go about drawing cartoons and so on?

Bob Mankoff: “…I would get up and I would go to the drawing board. I used to spend hours and hours reading the papers, thinking, getting ideas and looking at ideas that I had done before. Taking a nap, drinking coffee, getting up and drinking coffee. I would have two days.

PM: Do you mean two days in a day?

BM: Two days in a day you would get ideas. There would be a period early in the morning where you would get ideas and work through them. My life at that time, my mind was always on for ideas constantly in the world. It was in a way an unpleasant and narrow experience. You have to work and enormously hard to get the ten or twenty ideas every week. The structure was that my conscious and unconscious mind was always in the back processing material. I’m sure standups are doing that also. I’m delighted I’m no longer doing that.

PM: Were you single at the time?

BM: I was single, married, single and married. I’ve been married three times. I’m sure this is true for stand-ups and other people where there’s so much of your mind is eaten up by this natural talent or propensity that you have that gets blown out of all proportion.

PM: You don’t seem terribly wistful about doing this.

BM: No, I’m not. First of all, I did what I think is good work. It’s a young person’s game. The idea that creative comic art goes on forever. It doesn’t. I always had other interests from the start. I was never singly looking at that. Fairly early, I got into The New Yorker in ’77. By 1984, I had burned out…”

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I bolded the stand-out section,“It’s a young person’s game. The idea that creative comic art goes on forever. It doesn’t.”   Hmmmn, reallyWe’re reminded every so often that nothing lasts forever; I’ve found, however, that cartoonists are most often young at heart — their comic creativity tends to last as long as they do, no matter their age (and I have to stick with New Yorker cartoonists here as I have zero knowledge of cartoonists in other fields). But you be the judge. Here’s a piece,”Looking On The Bright Side” — ever so slightly condensed — I wrote for The New Yorker‘s website in 2008.

 

Unlike baseball players or football players, who usually retire before their fortieth birthday, cartoonists tend to remain on the field for a very long time. For a while now, I’ve kept a black binder labeled “New Yorker Cartoonist Obits.” Look—I know that may seem a little dark, and maybe it is, but I had a childhood interest in reading obituaries, and when I grew up it seemed as natural as death itself that I begin collecting obituaries of New Yorker cartoonists.

What’s striking is the lengthy lives that many cartoonists have led, and how many of them were still working well into their eighth and ninth decades.

The average age of the last dozen New Yorker cartoonists who have spilled their final bottle of ink was 86.* I brighten when I think of the average age as 86, although I have plans to go on much longer than that—bypassing Mischa Richter at 90, Syd Hoff at 91, George Price at 93, and William Steig at 95.

Simple math tells me — if I’ve done it right—that when I reach the age of 86, it will be the year 2040; I’ll be working on my weekly batch of drawings, and looking forward to at least another decade of work. If I’m lucky.

*Curious if the average had changed, I’ve gone back this morning and looked at the ages of the more recent last dozen New Yorker cartoonists who passed away. The average age: 82.  The average lowered from 86 by the deaths of three colleagues who left us way too soon: Leo Cullum (age 68), Michael Crawford (70), and Jack Ziegler (74), all still very much in their prime and contributing to the magazine at the time of their passing.  Had we not lost those three artists, the average would’ve remained at 86. 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Politics and privilege, from Peter Kuper, whose website can be found here.

Peter Porges Work Shown In Vienna; New Yorker Art Aplenty In Swann Catalog; Out Of This World Eckstein Cartoons Auctioned Today; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Tom Chitty

Peter Porges Work Shown In Vienna

Work by Peter Porges, a New Yorker cartoonist who passed away in 2016, is currently on exhibit in Vienna (beginning today).  All the information here.

Mr. Porges began contributing to The New Yorker in 1965.  His first drawing appears above.

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New Yorker Art Aplenty In Swann Catalog

The June 4th Swann catalog features a large number of original pieces by New Yorker artists, including the New Yorker cover art by Charles Saxon cover shown above left, and the Richard Taylor drawing, above right, and Tom Toro’s below it.  Among the other New Yorker artists represented: Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, Charles Addams, R.O. Blechman, Edward Gorey, Frank Modell, Misha Richter, Liana Finck, Donald Reilly, Liam Walsh, Gahan Wilson, Andre Francoise, and  J. B. Handelsman.

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 Out Of This World Eckstein Cartoons Auctioned

From Attempted Bloggery, May 7, 2019,  “Hello Roswell: Four Space Cartoons By Bob Eckstein”

The auction is today! All the info here.

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Some American history via Tom Chitty, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit his website here.

 

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit; Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”; Article Of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson; A Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

The New York Times Nurit Karlin Obit

From The New York Times, May 7, 2019, “Nurit Karlin, Who Found Her Voice In Wordless Cartoons, Dies At 80”

Above: Liza Donnelly, on the left, with Ms. Karlin in Tel Aviv in 2017.  Far right: A Nurit Karlin self-portrait

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Cover Revealed For Liana Finck’s “Excuse Me”

Due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self promises to be a fun 416 page collection by Ms. Finck, who began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 2013. 

 

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Article of Interest: Rowland B. Wilson

From the Art Contrarian, May 6, 2019, “The Carefully Observant Rowland B. Wilson” — this piece on Mr. Wilson who contributed 47 cartoons to The New Yorker from 1961 – 1981.

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Sempe Illustrated Story To Be Animated

From Cartoon Brew, May 6, 2019, “Goscinny and Sempe’s ‘Le Petit Nicholas’ to be Adapted as 2D Animated Film by On Entertainment” 

Mr. Sempe began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. 

(a tip of the hat to Mike Lynch, whose social media post brought this piece to my attention).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

A Game Of Thrones coffee cup inspires today’s Daily cartoon (…by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012. 

 

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