The Online Tilley Watch, The Week Of March 4-8, 2019; Fave Photo Of The Day: Sorel & Gerberg; Elisabeth McNair Pencilled; Interview Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Marcellus Hall; Bud Grace On His Second(?) New Yorker Cartoon

The Daily cartoons this week were brought to us by Brendon Loper, Farley Katz, Peter Kuper, Tim Hamilton, and JAK (Jason Adam Katzenstein).  A mixed-bag, thematically, with three outta five of the cartoons Trumpish.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Amy Hwang, Ed Steed, and Ali Soloman.

See all of the above, and more, here.

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Fave Photo Of The Day: Sorel & Gerberg

Meant to post this a few weeks back. It was taken at The New York Historical Society opening for Mort Gerberg’s exhibit.  That’s Mr. Gerberg on the left and the great Edward Sorel on the right.

The exhibit, “Mort Gerberg Cartoons: A New Yorker’s Perspective” runs through May 5th.

(photo used with permission of Mr. Gerberg).

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Elisabeth McNair Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful Case For Pencils continues with the spotlight on Elisabeth McNair (above) and her tools of the trade.  Ms. McNair’s first New Yorker drawing appeared in the July 30, 2018 issue.  See the post here.

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Interview Of Interest: Cover Artist Marcellus Hall

From DART (Design Arts Daily), March 7, 2019, “The DART Interview: Marcellus Hall”

Mr. Marcellus’s first New Yorker cover appeared in 2005. Link here to his website.

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Bud Grace On His 2nd New Yorker Cartoon

Bud Grace, writes on his blog about his second New Yorker drawing, and a particularly good edit by the then cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz.

Not to be too nit-picky about this, but Mr. Grace identifies the above as his second New Yorker cartoon, yet I’m unable to find his first on the New Yorker‘s database. Perhaps he sold two, and only one (the one above)  appeared? Mr. Grace, if you see this,  please advise.

 

 

 

A Great Cartoonist Needs Our Help

 

The Spill ends the work-week the way it began, with notice of a GoFundMe campaign for the great New Yorker cartoonist, Gahan Wilson, who is suffering from severe dementia. 

To donate and read all about the campaign go here.

For close to forty-five years Mr. Wilson has shared his fabulous world with us in the pages and on the cover of The New Yorker.  Steven Charles-Jaffee’s 2013 documentary, Born Dead, Still Weird, gave us a tour of Mr. Wilson’s real-life world — it’s a must see for anyone who loves comic art and artists.  

To see his work go to the official Gahan Wilson websiteThere’s also The New Yorker Cartoon Bank.

 

Book On The Horizon…”A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Audio Of Interest: Roz Chast; Audio Of Interest: Bob Eckstein: Chris Ware In School; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

Coming this July from Ohio State University Press,  A Mile And A Half of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber.

Edited by Michael Rosen, with contributions from Rosemary Thurber, Liza Donnelly, Seymour Chwast, Ian Frazier, and yours truly.

From the publisher:

Humorist, cartoonist, writer, playwright. James Thurber was to the twentieth century what Mark Twain was to the nineteenth. At one point, his books were the most read of any American in the world. His work could be found anywhere—from the pages of the New Yorker to the pages of children’s books, from illustrated advertisements to tea towels and dresses. Now, in celebration of the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth, A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber is a long overdue introduction and reintroduction to James Thurber and the artwork that fundamentally changed American cartoons. Including some 260 drawings, this collection is the first comprehensive focus on his work as an artist, a cartoonist, and an illustrator.

Coinciding with the first major retrospective of Thurber’s art presented by the Columbus Museum of Art in 2019, A Mile and a Half of Lines showcases both classic Thurber as well as visual material never before seen in print.

 

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

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Video of Interest: Liza Donnelly

Liza Donnelly was just out in Silicon Valley live-drawing at the Global Women In Data Science Conference. A short video here about her work

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Here’s her website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

A lot of fun snowman talk in this half -hour radio interview with Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007. (scroll down to February 13, 2019).

Mr. Eckstein is also the editor of this upcoming cartoon anthology:

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Roz Chast

From WBAI (NYC), March 6, 2019, this hour-long interview with Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.  Here’s her website.

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Chris Ware In School

From Skidmore College, March 6, 2019, “Cartoonist Chris Ware Talks Art careers”  — Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.  

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

 Facebook is the subject of today’s Daily, courtesy of cartoonist Farley Katz.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Here’s his website.

 

 

Guilty Pleasures: 75 New Yorker Cartoons Reprinted; Today’s Daily New Yorker Cartoonist: Tim Hamilton; Reminder: Roz Chast At The Strand Tonight; New York Times Op-Ed On The American Bystander; Gahan Wilson GoFundMe Campaign Over A Third Of The Way To Goal

Somehow this December 2018 release escaped notice here. What’s of particular interest are the number of reprinted New Yorker cartoons it contains: 75 of them. I can’t remember a nonNew Yorker book that has ever come close to reprinting this many (if anyone does, please let me know).

PR from the publisher, The Oxford University Press:

In Guilty Pleasures, legal scholar Laura Little provides a multi-faceted account of American law and humor, looking at constraints on humor (and humor’s effect on law), humor about law, and humor in law.

To give you an idea of how massive this usage is, here are the drawings (with each cartoon’s artist and assigned Cartoon Bank number):

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Today’s Trumptoon

Tim Hamilton does the honors today — see it here. Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Reminder: Roz Chast At The Strand Tonight at 7:00

All the info here!

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New York Times Op-Ed On The American Bystander

A fun NYTs Op-Ed on The American Bystander, past and present  (mentions George Booth, Sam Gross, and Ms. Chast)

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Gahan Wilson GoFundMe Campaign Over A Third Of Its Way To Goal

One of the great contemporary New Yorker cartoonists is suffering from severe dementia. A GoFundMe campaign is underway to help Mr. Wilson. Read about it here and to donate.

 

Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper; Crumb & Nancy; A GoFundMe Campaign for Gahan Wilson

Today’s Daily cartoon — Trump awash — is by Peter Kuper.  Mr. Kuper began contributing  to The New Yorker in 1993.  Link to his website here.

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Crumb & Nancy

The other day we saw several photos of Robert Crumb in NYC holding up a copy of the forthcoming anthology, The Book Of Weirdo. Mr. Crumb also held up and endorsed the lauded How To Read Nancy by Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden.

(photo courtesy of Paul Karasik via Drew Friedman).

In an email conversation with Mr. Karasik regarding Mr. Crumb’s work he recommended I watch  this hour-long panel discussion, “Crumb, Race and Gender” at MICE (Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo).

Mr. Karasik began contributing his work to The New Yorker in 1999.

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A GoFundMe Campaign For Gahan Wilson

There is a GoFundMe campaign for the great New Yorker, Playboy, and National Lampoon cartoonist Gahan Wilson, who is suffering from severe dementia.

Mr. Wilson began sharing his wonderfully peculiar world with The New Yorker’s readership in 1976. Below, one of his covers.

Link here to see more of his work.