The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 20, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Joe Dator

The Cover: It’s the Innovators Issue, hence the use of some headings floating in yellow-orangey color fields, like so:

 

  Let’s hope these color fields aren’t permanent innovations.

On the cover: robots by Tom Gauld.  Read what he has to say about his work here. The cover reminded me ever-so-slightly of Peter Arno’s meeting-of-the-dogs cover from the ancient times. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Another week with a cartoonist making their print debut (11 out of 19 issues thus far in 2019).  Kasia Babis is the 11th new cartoonist brought into the magazine’s stable this year, and the 37th cartoonist brought in by Emma Allen since she took the cartoon editor reins in May of 2017.

If the Spill handed out blue ribbons like the now dormant Cartoon Companion once did, I’d pin one on Sam Gross’s snail mail cartoon in the issue (p.30).

Rea Irvin:  A fun innovation this issue would’ve been bringing back something in the magazine that never should’ve gone away: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. But not this week. Anyway, it appears below in its usual Monday Spill spot.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Joe Dator on  fiction and/or/or not fiction.  Visit his website here.

Mr. Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006. 

Note: Mr. Dator, along with several other New Yorker cartoonists (Lars Kenseth and Mort Gerberg among them) will be appearing at this week’s National Cartoonists Society Fest in California. The Daily Cartoonist has all the info here.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 8, 2019; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Kendra Allenby

 

The Cover:   A circus acrobat practicing on a high bar (this is “The Health Issue”).  Read what the cover artist, Kenton Nelson, has to say about it here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Seventeen cartoonists (the duo effort counted as one cartoonist unit), with one, Adam Douglas Thompson, making his New Yorker print debut. Mr. Thompson is the 6th new cartoonist of the year, and the 30th brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, kicked-off in May of 2017.

The duo of Adam Cooper and Mat Barton first appeared in the magazine in 2014.

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I won’t ID it, but there’s one cartoon in the issue that, for me, is a real head scratcher: i.e., I don’t “get” it.   Will call a friend later for help.

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 The Spill applause icon is standing by for a few of the drawings in the issue:

Pia Guerra’s fab Charles Addamsesque drawing on page 79. Seeing it this morning drove me back to looking through a number of Addams’ collections (see below).  If there have ever been geniuses in our stable, he’s one.

Two pages later, Zach Kanin also delivers an Addamsesque drawing. A wonderful cartoon. 

Applause and an observation regarding Brendan Loper’s laundry drawing on page 70:  both the drawing and the reader’s appreciation of the drawing would benefit from a drawing as cinematic as this appearing larger on the page. It’s given a decent space, but why not even more? (illustrations continue to have more exposure. There are 6 full (or nearly full) page illustrations in the issue). 

Here, by the way, are the Addams collections I looked through this morning:

 

Finally, as always, here’s Rea Irvin’s mothballed classic Talk masthead (you can read about it here):

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 See Kendra Allenby’s take here on the unSpringlike weather.  Ms. Allenby began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  Visit her website here.

 

    

 

 

Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper; A Chapter Of Interest: Always On Wednesday

Today’s Daily cartoon, AG Barr-ish, is by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in June of 2011.  Visit his website here.

And check out his latest book!

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Chapter Of Interest: Always On Wednesday

In preparation for the upcoming MoCCA Fest panel, Mort Gerberg and Friends, celebrating Mr. Gerberg’s essential  On the Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle  (Fantagraphics), I’ve been looking at a lot of Mr. Gerberg’s drawings, as well as his 1983 Cartooning: The Art and The Business.  Admittedly not one for process books (i.e., “how-to”) I was quite surprised to discover in the very first chapter of The Art and The Business  a wonderful first hand account by Mr. Gerberg of what it was like for cartoonists making the rounds of magazines in New York City back in the early 1960s. I’ve shown just the first page of Chapter One’s twenty-three pages (want to continue reading?  You can easily find the book online). This is probably the most extensive account I’ve read about the “look day” of long long ago (so long ago that it is no longer Always Wednesdays, at least at The New Yorker, where it’s been Always Tuesdays for several decades). Even though Mr. Gerberg references The Saturday Evening Post on the first page, any cartoonist who went in to the New Yorker for “look day” will recognize the sign-in sheet tradition. 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 21, 2019

An interesting cover this week, reminiscent of Arthur Getz‘s great city landscapes: a dark city view with a small area of bright lights slicing through. That contrast of dark with dramatic light was close to a Getzian specialty (similar scenes were also beautifully painted by a number of other New Yorker artists through the years). If you can, get hold of The Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker (Knopf, 1989) — you won’t regret it.

For more on the current cover, you can read about the artist, Pascal Campion here.

The Cartoons/Cartoonists:




Some cartoons of note in this issue:

The solid drawing on page 22 of two couples about to cross paths on a suspended narrow rope bridge marks Hartley Lin‘s cartoon debut in the magazine.

As happily the case with Lars Kenseth‘s work, his stone man on page 30 is something outside the norm.

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell‘s cinematic post-party drawing on page 51 is terrific, as is Olivia de Recat’s Alarmist Clock on page 63.

On page 59, another cartoonist’s New Yorker debut: Karl Stevens.

Mr. Lin and Mr. Stevens are the first new New Yorker cartoonists of 2019, and the 25th and 26th new cartoonists making their debut in the magazine since Emma Allen became the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor in May of 2017.

…before I turn out the lights on this post, let us not forget that Rea Irvin’s beautiful Talk masthead (below) is still in storage. Read all about it here.


Short Video Of Interest: Setting Up The Bruce Museum’s Masterpieces From The Museum Of Comic Art Exhibit; Attempted Bloggery Looks At George Price

Here’s a short (3 minute) video showing some decision-making for the Bruce Museum’s “Masterpieces From The Museum of Comic Art” exhibit. More info here.

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Attempted Bloggery Looks At George Price

Attempted Bloggery, a Spill go-to website has begun spotlighting some interesting George Price work, including the oddity above. See it all here.

George Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig). Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

Below: I’ve always loved the cover of Price’s 1963 collection, My Dear 500 Friends.