The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 11, 2019

The Cover: Bruce McCall returns with a cut-away cover. I can’t think of a New Yorker cut-away drawing without thinking of this Charles Addams classic from April 28, 1951 (found on the left, mid-way down the link page). 

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the cartoons in this week’s issue:

…as a P.S. Mueller fan, and as someone who loves cowboy drawings, it was a blast coming upon his drawing on page 75….

…there are two cartoons in the issue as a result of team work: one by Kamraan Haffeez and Al Batt, the other by Corey Pandolf and Craig Baldo…

… work appears by two of the three New Yorker cartoonists who’ve been published in The New Yorker longer than any of the other active contributors*: Edward Koren and George Booth. Edward Koren’s first New Yorker cartoon was published May 26, 1962. Mr. Booth’s first New Yorker drawing was published in the issue of June 14, 1969. *Mort Gerberg is second — his first drawing appeared in April of 1965. It should be noted that Sam Gross is hot on Mr. Booth’s heels — his first New Yorker drawing appeared August 23, 1969, two months after Mr. Booth’s first.

…the way Karen Sneider drew the two characters in her fun cartoon (p.80) vaguely reminds me of Chon Day’s work. Mr. Day’s style seemed to me a way more organized and orderly version of Thurber’s. Mr. Day did wonders with a simple line, and an occasional layer of faint wash.

…really like the pay-off of Amy Hwang’s caption in her drawing (on page 61).

…congrats to all the runners in yesterday’s NYC Marathon, including our very own Liza Donnelly    who ran the big race for the very first time (her “Was Married” drawing appears on page 78).

The Rea Irvin Missing (and Missed) Talk Masthead Watch

The above jewel has been missing from The New Yorker since the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Peter Kuper’s NYT’s Book Review Back Page; The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019; Karasik Speaks; A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

Peter Kuper’s New York Times Book Review  “Graphic Review”

Be sure to check out Peter Kuper’s “Graphic Review” (featured in tomorrow’s New York Times Book Review). His new book, Heart Of Darkness is out November 5th. He’ll be appearing to sign and speak about the book twice in New York next week (see yesterday’s Spill for links to venues).

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The Tilley Watch Online, October 28 – November 1, 2019: an end of the week listing of New Yorker artists that contributed online to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Ali Solomon, Karen Sneider, Johnny DiNapoli, Barbara Smaller, Kim Warp, Ellis Rosen.

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman, Ellis Rosen & Colin Stokes, Ali Fitzgerald.

and…the stand alone feature,  Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

Go here to see all of the above and more (including Lynda Barry’s Daily Shouts piece, “Making Comics: The Face-Jam Excercise”), 

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Karasik Speaks

See the poster for all the info, and/or go here. Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

His most recent book, co-authored with Mark Newgarden, was How to Read Nancy: The Elements Of Comics In Three Easy Panels, published by Fantagraphics  in 2017.

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A Mary Petty Exhibit In Maryland

A Mary Petty exhibit is about to open at St. John’s Mitchell Gallery.  All the info here.

Ms. Petty’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

 

Liza Donnelly At SXSW 2020; Peter Kuper In Conversation; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Liza Donnelly, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in 1982, is scheduled to appear at SXSW 2020.  Info here. Link to her website here.

Ms. Donnelly’s  Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists And Their Cartoons (Promethius) is a must have for every fan of New Yorker cartoons.

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Peter Kuper In Conversation Monday, November 4th

Celebrating the release of Heart Of Darkness, Peter Kuper will be at Shakespeare & Company this coming Monday (November 4th) at 7pm in conversation with Jeremy Dauber. Info here.

And later next week:

Mr. Kuper will be at Greenlight Books 686 Fulton Street, Brooklyn. Thursday, November 7, 2019

7:30 PM. Info here.

Link here to Mr. Kuper’s website.  Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Ali Solomon, who began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018, on marathon watching.

 

Boo!

Happy Halloween!

Here’s a rejected cover submitted to The New Yorker ages and ages ago (sometime in the 1980s) and brought out here on previous Halloweens (what can I say? I like cupcakes). While this one wasn’t green-lighted, another of my Halloween covers was accepted (by then New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb, with Lee Lorenz as art editor). Unfortunately that one was a casualty of Tina Brown’s hiring (she “killed” it, along with droves of other bought material by an assortment of the magazine’s artists).

Anyway, it’s always fun to connect Halloween with baked goods. Heck, it’s fun to connect baked goods with any day of the year.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Karen Sneider witches brew. Ms. Sneider began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

 

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Addams On Halloween

Can’t not mention Charles Addams on this spooky day. It’s a lot of fun having so much Addams in the news lately due to the just released Addams Family animated film. But even without the film, The Addams Family remains a fixture in our culture.  As a student of New Yorker cartoons I never tire of sitting down and looking through any one of his anthologies. The care he put into his work is inspirational.  Each cartoon seems a gem, perfectly (and I’d guess lovingly) constructed. Addams was never my cartoon guru (Thurber is), but I learned more than I’ll ever know from his work.

 

For more on Addams, read Linda Davis’s biography, and go to the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation website.

Above: Chas Addams Monster Rally was published in 1950 by Simon & Schuster