Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); New York Times Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”

From The New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, February 11, 2020,  “A Look At Wes Anderson’s New, New Yorker-Inspired Film” this should be fun.

Above: the poster, which resembles a certain magazine’s cover. Read more here.

Above: Bill Murray as the magazine’s editor, Arthur Howitzer, Jr. — a character “inspired by Harold Ross, The New Yorker‘s founding editor…[with] a dash of A.J. Liebling.”

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Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet

From Fab TV, this YouTube video of Liza Donnelly on Oscar’s Red Carpet this past Sunday.

Ms. Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982, has posted all of her Red Carpet drawings on Medium.

For more info visit Liza Donnelly’s website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

Brendan Loper on the field of Democratic Presidential candidates.

Mr. Loper began contributing to in 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Lila Ash on too many caucuses. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. See more of her work here.

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New York Times Magazine Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

From The New York Times Magazine, “Tina Brown on the future of the royal family” — Don’t be fooled by the title, this piece by Dave Marchese, includes a good bit of New Yorker talk.

Left: Edward Sorel‘s cover for Ms. Brown’s first issue of The New Yorker (October 5, 1992).

 

 

The Tilleys They Are A-Changin’… The New Yorker’s 95th Anniversary Issue, February 17, 2020

The cover above, by Rea Irvin, appeared on the very first issue of The New Yorker — thereafter it showed up for every anniversary issue from 1926 through 1993. If you happen to have a bunch of those anniversary issues and fan them out on your floor — such as I did back in 2008 — they look pretty neat:

In 1994, Tina Brown broke the string of Rea Irvin Tilleys by running Robert Crumb’s “Elvis Tilley.”  Since 1994 Mr. Irvin’s original cover (with slight alterations from time-to-time) has been seen in the years 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009. It was last seen 2011.

In 1995, Irvin’s Tilley appeared swimming in gold to celebrate the magazine’s 75th anniversary. When the original Tilley hasn’t appeared he’s been replaced by look-a-likes, or take-offs, or homages, or what-have-yous. Sometimes Tilley has been left off/left out altogether. On this week’s 95th anniversary issue, there is, what’s described on the Table of Contents, an “origin” cover by Barry Blitt (who also supplied the Tilley-ish spot drawings this week).

My instinct to gather has led to the below gallery of substitute anniversary covers, from Crumb to Blitt. Included are the covers that have no Tilley reference whatsoever but appeared in the anniversary slot.

Above: the non-Tilley anniversary cover artists: R. Crumb (1994), R.O. Blechman (1996), Art Spiegelman (1997), Michael Roberts (1998), Edward Sorel 1999), William Wegman 2000), Chris Ware (2005), Seth (2008), Chris Ware (2010), Bruce McCall (2012), Simon Greiner (2013) Jorge Colombo (2014), Barry Blitt (2015), Liniers (2016), John W. Tomac (2017), Malika Favre (2018), Kadir Nelson (2019), Barry Blitt (2020)

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

 Zoe Si is the first newbie of 2020. She is the fifty-fourth new cartoonist brought into the magazine’s stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Fourteen cartoons in this issue (fifteen cartoonists as Emily Flake provided a “Sketchpad”), with two cartoon gods on board: Edward Koren and George Booth.  With Valentine’s Day approaching, cartoon love is in the issue, including a great cupid cartoon by Paul Noth and a fab love & justice drawing by Peter Vey.  A Spill round of applause for those as well as Bruce Eric Kaplan’s splendid dinner party drawing.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: this being a big birthday issue, I had low high hopes for a return of Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead (shown below).  Alas, the spring of 2017 re-draw is still in place. Read about the original and its replacement here.

 

 

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet; A New Yorker State Of Mind: Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of February 3-7, 2020

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet

Liza Donnelly will be back on Oscar’s Red Carpet tomorrow night for her fifth year of live-drawing.  Five years ago she made Oscar history by being the very first cartoonist to draw while on the Red Carpet. She began posting drawings yesterday, and will continue posting today, leading up to her coverage of tomorrow night’s big shindig. Follow her on Instagram & Twitter: @lizadonnelly

Above: Ms. Donnelly yesterday on the mostly still-covered red carpet.

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Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing

A Spill fave blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker, takes a close look at the issue of January 31, 1931, which boasts James Thurber’s inaugural New Yorker cartoon appearance. Read it here.

According to Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography (Ohio State University Press, 1968), Thurber’s previous published drawing appeared in his college’s magazine,Ohio State’s Sun-Dial, March 1918.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week

The Daily Cartoon:

Ellis Rosen, Jon Adams, J.A.K., Chris Weyant, Trevor Spaulding

Daily Shouts: Ali Fitzgerald, J.A.K., Olivia de Recat (with Sarah Vollman)

...and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Review Of Interest: Carol Isaacs’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”; Photo: A Cartoonist & A Kitty

Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

Oscar in therapy courtesy of Ellis Rosen who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

Visit his website here.

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Review Of Interest: Carol Isaacs’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”

From Broken Frontier, February 6, 2020, “The Wolf of Baghdad: Memoir Of A Lost Homeland — Carol Isaacs Provides A Haunting Account Of Persecution In Mid-Twentieth Century Iraq”

 Ms. Isaacs is also known as The Surreal McCoy. She began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014 (that first drawing signed “T.S. McCoy”). Visit her website here.

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Photo: Garrett Price & Friend

The arrival in today’s mail of a Garrett Price sketch caused me to go to his one collection, Drawing Room Only. Looking through, I’d forgotten that the photo shown here was on the back flap. I thought what better way to end this wacky week than with a photo of a cartoonist and a kitty.

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Garrett Price  Born, 1897, Bucyrus, Kansas. Died, April, 1979, Norwalk, Conn. Collection: Drawing Room Only: A Book of Cartoons (Coward -McCann, 1946). New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.

 

Book Of Interest: Gerald Scarfe’s Memoir; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

 

 

Book Of Interest: Gerald Scarfe’s Memoir

Here’s a title I missed: Gerald Scarfe’s memoir, Long Drawn Out Trip, published by Little, Brown last Fall.

Mr. Scarfe was a frequent contributor to The New Yorker during the Tina Brown era (1992-1998).

Link here to the publisher’s page.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jon Adams on Trump’s day after choice.

Mr. Adams began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit his website here.

 

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Ali Fitzgerald:   “America!: Open-Mike Night In The Forest”