Today’s Daily Cartoon, The Weekend Daily Shouts Cartoonist, And The Fave Photo Of The Day

A snowsuit via Carolita Johnson, and a weekend Shouts piece by Navied Mahdavian

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Fave Photo Of The Day

    Here’s Patricia Marx & Roz Chast last week at the great Strand bookstore celebrating the publication of their latest collaboration, You Can Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time: Rules For Couples

Their previous book:

Photo courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of January 27, 2020; David Salle Incorporates Peter Arno Drawings

The Cover: A NYC subway situation, by Luci Gutierrez.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Every first run through the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker  I feel as if I’m browsing the goods behind glass in a pastry shop’s display case, appreciating the variety, before beginning to narrow down which one to select, if in the buying mood. In this new issue, a number of pastries caught my eye. In no particular order here are some favorites.

…Sofia Warren’s four part color piece (it’s on page 36) fits nicely in the New Yorker school of cartoons that go beyond eliciting a laugh, capturing a lovely moment.  An earlier example of one of those moments is Arnie Levin’s classic multi-panel New Yorker drawing, “It’s only the wind”  from September 18, 1978 (it originally ran across the top of two facing pages, four panels to a page):

…Christopher Weyant’s  drawing on page 40, of a fellow leaving his blimp at a parking garage, is a text book example of the classic New Yorker one-two punch cartoon (as defined by Peter Arno).

…On page 22 you’ll find Danny Shanahan’s terrific drawing of cats with a tech problem.

…A perfect look on the guy’s face who’s tasting olive oil in Lars Kenseth’s cartoon (p. 42).  As mentioned on the Spill not long ago, veteran New Yorker cartoonist Henry Martin once said to me that certain cartoonists “draw funny” — it was meant as a compliment. Mr. Kenseth draws funny.

…The woman standing beside Liana Finck’s former dog walker (p.55) ever-so-slightly echoes Edward Gorey’s elongated figures. Ms. Finck’s drawings remind me, in a way, of Michael Shaw’s — the lines delivered as if direct from the muse.

…also in the issue: Insecure(?) Gods (by Hartley Lin), an update on Dolly,  the cloned sheep (Navied Mahdavian), criminals in an alleyway (Frank Cotham), a comet denier dinosaur (Jessica Olien), trash in space (Roz Chast), a couple in basement counting babysitter money (Amy Hwang), a doctor’s brainy children (Paul Noth), and a possible game changer (Liam Walsh).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  A–gasp!– redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead design has been in place since the Spring of 2017.

If granted three cartoon wishes, one of them would be the return of Mr. Irvin’s work to its home of 92 years.  Read about the switcheroo here.

The missing masthead appears below.

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David Salle Incorporates Arno Drawings

From Creative Boom, January 20, 2020, “Vibrant paintings inspired by advertising and cartoons from The New Yorker in the 1950s” — this piece on David Salle (fabulously!) incorporating  Peter Arno drawings within his paintings.

Shown above: Mr. Salle’s “A Night In The Sky With Friends”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of January 13-17, 2020; A Note About Next Week’s New Yorker

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Brendan Loper (twice), Mort Gerberg, David Sipress, J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat & Julia Edelman, Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above and more go here.

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A Note About Next Week’s New Yorker

Oddly, the digital edition of next week’s issue (January 27, 2020) has appeared two days early. Although it’s out today, I’m going to stick to the usual Monday posting of commentary on the cartoons.

In the meantime here’s the cover, by Luci Gutierrez, and the line-up of cartoonists in the issue:

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoon Calendar Man, Jerry McCanna

Last week at a cartoonists lunch (noted here on the Spill), my colleagues Robert Leighton and John O’Brien brought up the subject of Jerry McCanna and his New Yorker cartoon calendars. When they told me that Jerry had recently passed away I asked Robert and John if they would care to write a piece about him. What follows is Robert and John’s wonderful contribution about a fellow who, in his unique way, expressed his love of New Yorker cartoons on a daily basis for three decades. 

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Many people consider themselves New Yorker cartoon fans, but few have expressed their fandom more enthusiastically or more unflaggingly (less flaggingly?) than Jerry McCanna, who died December 17.

Each year for the past thirty years, McCanna, not a cartoonist but a lover of the form, clipped all the cartoons and assembled a charmingly homemade page-a-day calendar, painstakingly attaching day and date to each cartoon wherever it would fit (and across the least objectionable area when it wouldn’t). Then he copied them, glued them, trimmed them and sent them out, gratis, to family and friends, some of them New Yorker cartoonists whom he met simply by seeking them out and sending them a bit of fan mail.

In his lighthearted correspondence with those cartoonists, who included John O’Brien since 1998 and Robert Leighton since 2004 (but perhaps many others over the years?) he expressed a thirsty curiosity about the workings of the cartoon caption contest, the change in Cartoon Department editorship, and the mystical process by which some cartoons are chosen and others are rejected. He was proud of the small collection of original sketches sent to him as thanks over the years (from the aforementioned, as well as David Sipress, among others), but his friendship came with no ulterior motives. He was a cheerleader of our talents,  never once asking for anything in return.

He’d been sick for a couple of years, but in early December, facing a grim prognosis, he signed off and promised that the new calendar would be finished and sent out by his wife and kids. The 2020 calendar, with the title “Final Edition,” arrived just a few days after the ball dropped and contains a year’s worth of cartoons that he will not get to tear off with the rest of us. He was 70.

 

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers

This grey day seemed like a good time to recall David Preston’s three New Yorker covers — all of them from the pre-buzz era when “quiet” New Yorker covers were plentiful. Below is Mr. Preston’s bio as it appeared at the 2015 Westport Historical Society exhibit, Cover Story: The New Yorker In Westport.

And here, courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon, is a photo from late 1965 taken at James Geraghty’s home in Westport, Connecticut.  Mr. Preston is seated far right. Standing next to Mr. Preston is Charles Saxon. Partially obscured behind the young fellow in the white shirt is Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Further info from the Spill‘s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Charles Saxon (Born in Brooklyn, NY,  Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

 

James Geraghty * (photo: Geraghty in his office at The New Yorker, 25 West 43rd St., 1948. Used with permission of Sarah Geraghty Herndon). Born Spokane, Washington, 1904. died Venice, Florida, January, 1983. While not a cartoonist, Geraghty’s contribution to the art of the New Yorker was substantial. He contributed material to cartoonists before and during his association with The New Yorker, where he served as art editor from 1939 until 1973, when the title passed to Lee Lorenz. In Geraghty’s NYTs obit (Jan 20, 1983), William Shawn said: “Along with Harold Ross, who was the first editor of the magazine, Geraghty set the magazine’s comic art on its course and he helped determine the direction in which the comic art would go and is still going.”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg on politics and news. Mr. Gerberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1965.

Visit his website here.