The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

Happy 94th George Booth!

One of our most beloved New Yorker cartoonists (and our senior member) turns 94 today. The Spill wishes George Booth a most happy happy day!

Here’s a nice Booth piece broadcast on CBS Sunday Morning back in 2017.

And, here’s his entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for the reminder (via social media) of Mr. Booth’s anniversary

Weekend Spill: Video Studio Tour Of Interest: Bob Eckstein; The Tilley Watch Online, June 22- 26, 2020

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Here’s a fun 6 minute video of Bob Eckstein’s studio.  Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  He’s authored and edited an number of books, most recently the Ultimate Cartoon Book series for Princeton Architectural Press.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Brendan Loper (twice), Lisa Rothstein, Farley Katz, Emily Flake.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), J.A.K..

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

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Fave Photo Of The Day: Liza Donnelly Drawing At The Norman Rockwell Museum; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Teresa Burns Parkhurst; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Liza Donnelly, whose work has been appearing in The New Yorker since 1982, was at The Norman Rockwell Museum yesterday morning  painting a mural in preparation for her exhibit there in mid-July. This will be Ms. Donnelly’s first-ever solo show of her work.

There will be a virtual opening event on July 10th at 5:30 at the museum. Ms. Donnelly will show you around the exhibit and answer questions.  Details will be on the Spill as we get closer to the date.

To see a short video of Ms. Donnelly working on the wall, go here to Instagram.

Link here to Donnelly’s website.

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A Case For Pencils Spotlights Teresa Burns Parkhurst

From Jane Mattimoe’s fab blog, this post on Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

Shown: Ms. Parkhurst’s work place (cropped).

To see all of the cartoonists that’ve been spotlighted on Case, go here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on a distant polling place.

Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in March of 2016.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman): “Dating Material: ‘That Guy’ Dissected”

Ms. de Recat has contributed to The New Yorker since February of 2018.

 

 

Thurber Thursday: The Tome; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

There are two fave Thurber biographies in this house: Burton Bernstein’s Thurber: A Biography, and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life And Times. I like to think of them as perfect bookends to any Thurber collection.

Bernstein’s (left), at 532 pages is the quick read; Kinney’s is 1,238. I think of the two books as I think of my two favorite Beatle biographies: Shout, by Philip Norman (c.400 pages), and Tune In by Mark Lewisohn (c.900 pages).  If you want a great read, well written, but don’t want to submerge, then it’s Norman’s Beatle book. If you want to go deep and stay there, it’s Lewisohn’s. Same applies to Bernstein and Kinney.

Both these books have appeared in paperback and are easily found.  I just may go back to Kinney’s right after I finish re-reading Tune In.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Video conference hell from Lisa Rothstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2019.