Barbara Shermund Celebrated At The Billy Ireland Museum

Exciting news! The Billy Ireland Cartoon Museum & Library will celebrate the great New Yorker artist, Barbara Shermund, with an exhibit, Tell Me A Story Where The Bad Girl Wins: The Life and Art of Barbara Shermund.  This promises to be wonderful show, with “photographs, letters, original art, and books never before displayed…” Curated by by Caitlin McGurk, Assistant Professor & Associate Curator, it runs from November 3, 2018 thru March 31, 2019.  More info here.

Above: a rough of Ms. Shermund’s New Yorker cover of March 18, 1939.

Below: a Shermund self-portrait

From the Billy Ireland website:

TELL ME A STORY WHERE THE BAD GIRL WINS: THE LIFE AND ART OF BARBARA SHERMUND:  Barbara Shermund is an unheralded early master of gag cartooning. Her sharp wit and loose style boldly tapped the zeitgeist of first-wave feminism with vivid characters that were alive and astute. Shermund’s women spoke their minds about sex, marriage, and society; smoked cigarettes and drank; and poked fun at everything in an era when it was not common to see young women doing so.

Caption for the above drawing: “Raymond was a beautiful baby.”

Caption for the above:

“He just inherited a million dollars.”

“Oh, but that’s so devitalizing”

Further Info:

 Here’s my Shermund piece from The Spill,  posted in 2009.

Revisiting  Barbara Shermund

Barbara Shermund, who died in early September, 1978, had the misfortune of passing away during a newspaper strike that affected the paper of record, The New York Times. An extensive search has turned up just one obituary for her, a four sentence notice that ran in a newspaper covering the New Jersey coastal town (Sea Bright) where she lived for a number of years toward the end of her life.

For someone who contributed hundreds of cartoons and eight covers to The New Yorker Magazine, then went on to become a mainstay at Esquire, four sentences seems a bit slight. Here then is another notice, a little late, and a little longer.

Born in San Francisco in 1899 to artistic parents (her father was an architect), Ms. Shermund studied at The California School of Fine Arts before heading east, at the age of twenty-six, to New York. She told Colliers that her initial visit east became permanent “after she had eaten up her return fare.” In June of that very year, she made her debut at the four month old New Yorker with a cover of a young woman sporting a hip hairdo, eyes closed, resting her arm over a railing, against a black sky peppered with stars. In a year’s time her cartoons, many if not most of which were written by her, were appearing in nearly every issue of the magazine.

Her style had a sway to it that fit the times. Her subjects, executed in pen and ink and wash, were often hip young women, just a bit jaded – the sort that famously inhabited F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise. She once offered up this brief glimpse into her private life, saying she liked “fancy dancing and dogs.”

Liza Donnelly, author of Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and their Cartoons, had this to say about Ms. Shermund:

“Barbara Shermund was one of the more prolific cartoonists of the early New Yorker. Her breezy drawing style and humor reflected the new attitudes of urban women in the twenties and thirties, and she can be considered one of the early feminist cartoonists. The New Yorker sought to appeal to both men and women with its humor, and Shermund, along with other women cartoonists of the magazine, were ground breakers in that regard, creating cartoons from a woman’s perspective that could be enjoyed by all. Her cartoons were irreverent, sassy, and a true reflection of her times.”

Shermund traveled widely – Donnelly wrote of her that “she was something of a wanderer, living with friends in the city and the upstate town of Woodstock [NY], never really having a set address.” Eventually she settled down in Sea Bright, New Jersey, a barrier beach town, just about an hour’s drive from New York.

The last of her five hundred and ninety-seven drawings in The New Yorker appeared September 16, 1944; her last cover appeared August 5, 1944. Although her relationship with The New Yorker fizzled in the mid 1940s, she participated in an Irving Penn group photo of eighteen New Yorker cartoonists ( it ran in the August 1947 issue of Vogue). Ms. Shermund, dressed in dark clothing and wearing a great wide brimmed hat, stares directly at the camera. Sitting directly in front of her is George Price, and Steinberg; overhead, reclining on a platform is Charles Addams. Off to Ms. Shermund’s right is Helen Hokinson, looking just a little apprehensive.

The discs accompanying The Complete New Yorker allow one to see all of Barbara Shermund’s work in their natural habitat. Nine of her drawings appear in the The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker, and of course all of her work can be seen on the discs accompanying the book.

Here’s Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barbara Shermund  Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later. post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

 — All images (except the small self-portrait at the top of this post) courtesy of The Billy Ireland Cartoon Museum and Library

 

 

More Funny Ladies Pix; Tilley Watch Online; Event Of Interest: David Sipress At Yale; Jon Hamm’s Captions; New Yorker State Of Mind Dives Into The New Yorker Issue of Sept. 29, 1929; Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest Cartoons

More Funny Ladies Pix

Liza Donnelly has graciously permitted the Spill to show some photos she took last Thursday night at Part 2 of her Funny Ladies panel at The Society of Illustrators.

Left to right: Amy Hwang, Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman, and Emily Flake. Foreground: Liza Donnelly

Below: Kendra Allenby with The New Yorker cartoon editor, Emma Allen. A super-de-duper animated Emily Flake in the back between them.

Below: New Yorker cartoonist, Jeremy Nguyen with Emily Flake.

Below: the panel in situ.

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New Yorker cartoonists contributing to this past week’s Daily Cartoon (as usual, a mostly Trumpian week): Brendan Loper (twice), Peter Kuper, and Farley Katz. 

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to this past week’s Daily Shouts: Mary Lawton, Marisa Acocella, Jason Adam Katzenstein (with Jesse McLaren), and Olivia de Recat.

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Event Of Interest: David Sipress At Yale

David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 1998 will deliver a lecture, (“What’s So Funny?”) at the Yale University Art Gallery on October 26th.  Info here.

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Jon Hamm’s Captions

Mr. Hamm, of Mad Men fame, is the latest celeb to give New Yorker cartoon captioning a go (with some excellent results!)   See it play out here.

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A New Yorker State of Mind

One of the Spill‘s favorite New Yorker-centric blogs dives deep into the issue of September 28, 1929. Fun awaits! Read it here.

Cover artist: Julian de Miskey, who contributed 82 cartoons and 62 covers to the New Yorker between 1925 and 1962.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC’s Max and Simon return like clockwork with their impressions of the cartoons in the latest New Yorker (the issue of  October 15, 2018 — the one with the Sempe cover). Read it here!

 

 

 

 

 

Fave Photos Of The Day: Funny Ladies At The Society Of Illustrators

Here are a number of photos from last night’s terrific Society of Illustrators event, Funny Ladies: The Changing Landscape of Cartooning [at The New Yorker].

All photos courtesy of Stephen Nadler, who runs the essential New Yorker cartoon/cartoonist-centric blog, Attempted Bloggery.

Above, the panelists standing in the aisle, pre-talk: Emily Flake, in mango-colored shirt, her back to the camera, ala Paul McCartney on the backside of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper lp;  just visible over her shoulder, Amy Kurzweil. Then, in profile, Liza Donnelly (who curated the Funny Ladies Exhibit and served as moderator for last night’s panel, and the previous panel in August); Center, looking right at the camera, is Emma Allen, the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor; Sara Lautman, in plaid; far right, in profile, Amy Hwang.

Below: the panelists, l-r:  Hwang, Kurzweil, Lautman, and Flake. On screen, Liza Donnelly’s developing live-drawing of the panel (that’s her below drawing on her iPad).

Below: Ms. Flake talks about her “resting perv face” drawing.

Below: Ms. Hwang talks about her home/rest area/work cartoon.

Below: Ms. Lautman talks about her tools of a cow drawing.

Below: Ms. Kurzweil speaks about her death to the patriarchy drawing.

And one more, pre-show:

New Yorker cartoonists spotted in the crowd included Ellis Rosen, Kendra Allenby, Jeremy Nguyen, Jason Chatfield, and Joe Dator.

The Society live-streamed the event on Facebook (it’s archived, so you can watch it, or re-watch it). 

 

 

 

 

 

Tonight’s The Night! Funny Ladies Panel At The Society Of Illustrators: Donnelly, Flake, Kurzweil, Hwang And Lautman Discuss The Changing Landscape Of New Yorker Cartooning

Tonight’s the night at The Society of Illustrators: Funny Ladies Part 2!  Five New Yorker cartoonists discuss New Yorker cartoons. From the SOC’s homepage:

What is  it like to sell cartoons to The New Yorker? Our panelists, recent newcomers to the magazine,  will talk about breaking into The New Yorker. Since the panelists are all women, we’ll talk about drawing cartoons about feminism and what -if anything- being a woman has to do with any of it.  We will argue, whine and dream about how to make a living as a cartoonist in the current landscape… without selling your soul. Liza will digitally draw the proceedings as they happen. 

All the info here.

Pictured above, left to right: Liza Donnelly (moderator of tonight’s event and curator of the Funny Ladies exhibit at the Society), Emily Flake, Amy Kurzweil, Amy Hwang, and Sara Lautman. 

Must See! Funny Ladies Panel Part 2 At The Society Of Illustrators, October 11th

If you enjoyed Funny Ladies Part 1 at the Society of Illustrators this past summer, you’re sure to enjoy Part 2 this Thursday night. Liza Donnelly, who curated the exhibit of women New Yorker cartoonists (running through October 13th), returns as moderator for a panel discussion with New Yorker cartoonists Sara Lautman, Amy Kurzweil, Amy Hwang and Emily Flake. 

 

 

All the info here