Lars Kenseth To Zoom And Talk Toon…Cartoon,That Is; Thurber Thursday: The Male Animal

Funny guy, Lars Kenseth is set to Zoom today, talking cartoons with a panel of contributors to Alta Journal of California.  To watch (it’s free)...link here!

Here’s Lars’ entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Lars Kenseth: New Yorker work: November 14, 2016 –. Lars is a cartoonist whose lumpy people have appeared in The New Yorker, Barron’s and Food And Wine’s FWx. With a heavy background in animation, Lars has spent the last decade drawing and writing for Fox, Disney, Mondo, Maker, MTV and, most recently, Adult Swim. He’s a 2016 Sundance Institute Fellow, a Dartmouth graduate and a long suffering acolyte of the New York Jets. A New England native, Lars wisely lives in Los Angeles with his wife Liz and their two feline dependents, Omelet and Honeybear. New Yorker work: November 14, 2016 –. Website: larskenseth.com/

For More Lars: Here’s a Spill piece from August of 2017:  “Lars Kenseth Talks About Deodorant People and His First New Yorker Cartoon”

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Thurber Thursday: The Male Animal

In my earlier years of collecting Thurber, and reading about Thurber, I was quite aware of Thurber & his pal, Elliot Nugent‘s play (and later a film), The Male Animal thanks to Burton Bernstein‘s Thurber biography.  But it wasn’t until  my wife and I drove, for the first time, to find Thurber’s home in Cornwall, Connecticut (the home he called “the great good place”) that I became aware of and saw the book shown here (not this exact book — another copy). It was on display in a small building in Cornwall (a welcome center or something?).

Years (and years) later, I finally found a copy — the one shown here (the arrival of the internet helped).

The book has, as you see below, a full page photo of Nugent, but not one of Thurber.  Perhaps the publisher thought the inclusion of Thurber drawings sort of balanced the graphics. Who knows!

There are, if my count is correct, eleven Thurber drawings scattered through the book, plus two full page b&w photos from the stage play. Here’s one of the eleven drawings:

 

 

 

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