Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist & Yesterday’s; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Ali Fitzgerald: “America!: How Birds Are Adjusting To Our New Reality”

Ms. Fitzgerald has been contributing since 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Emily Flake, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist: a newbie, Yasin Osman.  This is his first newyorker.com appearance (his work, as of yet, has not appeared in the print magazine).  Visit his website here.

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday: The Seal On The T-Shirt; Blitt In Conversation; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Thurber Thursday: The Seal On The T-Shirt

Thurber’s “All right, have it your way — you heard a seal bark!” published in The New Yorker January 30, 1932 was a moment: a moment for Thurber, a moment for The New Yorker, and a moment for cartoon art (and judging by the above photo of a fave t-shirt: a moment for merchandising). According to Thurber biographer Burton Bernstein:

“By the middle of 1932, the barking seal on the headboard was the most talked-about drawing of the year, and its creator had attracted a sizable following, sizable enough so that Harper & Brothers decided it was time to [bring] out a collection of Thurber art called, aptly, The Seal In The Bedroom and Other Predicaments.” 

By detouring around the standard polished drawings of cartoonists, and drawing his “unbaked cookie” people (as Dorothy Parker described Thurber people in her introduction to The Seal In The Bedroom) Thurber widened the understanding and acceptance of what a cartoon could be (and should be, depending on the artist).

The drawing  continues to pop up whenever Thurber’s art is discussed, and I have to add that it seems whenever his art is discussed there’s always an asterisk of sorts accompanying the discussion as here where the blogger says, “He should not be judged using professional criteria.” Well why shouldn’t he be judged using professional criteria (whatever that means).  However Thurber’s art is described, however it is judged, it is, to quote Ms. Parker when discussing the Seal drawing: “Mad, I don’t say. Genius, I grant you.”

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Blitt In Conversation

From The National Arts Club, “An Evening With New Yorker Cover Artist Barry Blitt”

Mr. Blitt will be in conversation with his editor at The New Yorker, Francoise Mouly.

His entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barry Blitt  Born in Montreal. New Yorker work: January 10, 1994 -. His first contribution to the magazine was a cover, one of many to come for the magazine. His cover, “Politics of Fear” for the issue of July 21, 2008 was and remains a cause celebre. His first cartoon appeared December 18, 2006. He was awarded a Pulitzer in 2020 for editorial cartooning. Website: barryblitt.com Mr. Blitt’s Wikipedia entry (with personal and professional history).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From Victor Varnado, who began contributing to The New Yorker  in July of 2019, on helpful signposts.

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Two Steinberg Videos Of Interest; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

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Two Steinberg Videos Of Interest

Incontro con Saul Steinberg

in Italian (with Steinberg’s voice dubbed). Screen grab above from this video. Fun to watch even if you don’t speak the language.

And… Steinberg: Outsider Extraordinairea National Gallery of Art lecture.

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Tim Hamilton on Trump in his bunker.

Mr. Hamilton has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016. Visit his website here.

Podcast Of Interest: R. Sikoryak; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

R. Sikoryak is Gil Roth’s latest guest on The Virtual Memories Show. You might remember that Mr. Sikoryak provided the cover (shown above right) for The New Yorker‘s special Cartoon Takeover issue (December 30th, 2019). Listen here.

–My thanks to fellow New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein for bringing this installment of the Virtual Memories Show to my attention.

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Adam Douglas Thompson on so much to read. Mr. Thompson began contributing to The New Yorker in 2019.

Visit his website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker (Double Issue) June 8 & 15, 2020

The fiction issue, and it’s a double. The next Monday Tilley Watch won’t be posted til the 15th, which seems like a long way away at the moment.  As has been the case since the magazine became a work-at-home situation, the digital issue is not yet posted (writing this noonish). I’ll use the slideshow found here (you’ll have to scroll down a-ways) to do a brief run through of some of the latest cartoons.

The Cover (above right): Read the short Q&A here with cover artist Richard McGuire.

The Cartoonists: Avi Steinberg, J.A.K., Liana Finck, Tom Toro, David Sipress, Frank Cotham, Julia Suits, Emily Flake, Roz Chast, Charlie Hankin, Peter Vey, Jack Ziegler, Amy Kurzweil

The Cartoons: Avi Steinberg’s reading tree drawing caught my eye this week, as did P.C. Vey’s couple in bed with a harmonica, Julia Suits sandbox couple, and Liana Finck’s grass-fed cows.  And, not needless to say: it’s always a special treat to see work surface by the late very very great Jack Ziegler.

It’s unusual to mention the Cartoon Caption Contest drawing, but I can’t help myself this week. Enjoyed how Lars Kenseth clowned around with a car (below left).

Graphically it reminded me a little of Edward Koren’s “Well there’s your problem” published as the cover drawing (and its caption used as the title of) Mr. Koren’s 1981 cartoon collection.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Until the digital issue pops up I can’t be sure if Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead design is still in mothballs.  My guess is that it is.  In the meantime here’s what went missing in the Spring of 2017:

Read more about it here.