Thurber Thursday: When Thurber’s Dr. Millmoss Returned To The New Yorker Via Danny Shanahan

I’m on record as believing Thurber’s “What have you done with Dr. Millmoss?” is a perfect drawing.  It appeared in The New Yorker,  July 14, 1934, but we didn’t get any kind of closure on Millmoss until February of 1991 when he turned up at a Returns counter in a Danny Shanahan cartoon. Two more Shanahan Thurberesque drawings over the next two years provided further glimpses of Millmoss’s world.

The Spill recently asked Mr. Shanahan about to talk about his Thurber Millmoss trio, and if the originals were, as I remembered, out in Columbus.

“I always loved the Thurber Millmoss cartoon, one of my all-time favorites. It was approaching the Christmas holiday, and gift cartoons were in my head (as were “return” cartoons). I came up with the Thurber tribute, the “return” of Millmoss, but didn’t know if it would fly with Lee [The New Yorker’s art editor, Lee Lorenz]. He loved it, The New Yorker ran it, so not long after I decided to keep it going. I came up with the second idea; once again, Lee loved it but thought it was too soon, and that maybe it would work better in The New Yorker’s anniversary issue. That’s where it ran, and the following year, as the next anniversary issue approached, I thought I should take a stab at wrapping up the whole saga. It worked out well, except for a handful of readers who thought I was trying to steal Thurber’s characters. The magazine got a few angry letters. And, yes, the originals were donated to The Thurber House, where they are on permanent display.”

Danny Shanahan began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988. His Thurber trio appeared in the following issues of the magazine:

“Dr. Millmoss!” February 25, 1991

“Do you have an appointment?”  February 24, 1992

“Good show, Mitty!” April 12, 1993

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Podcast Of Interest With Liza Donnelly; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

_____________________________________________________________________

Not too long ago before NYC largely shut down, Liza Donnelly dropped by The Comic Strip Live where she was a guest on Jane Condon’s podcast, Funny Over 50.

Listen here.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Visit her website here.

________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Home officing it, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: “The Day After Finishing Your Batch”; Barry Blitt Is Pulitzered; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon… And Yesterday’s

Fave Photo Of The Day

New Yorker cartoonist, Navied Mahdavian posted this photo of his desk the other day on Slack, labeling it the day after finishing your batch.  The Spill is posting it with colleagues in mind who are wrapping up their batches of drawings this morning as they rush to meet the Tuesday noon deadline for submitting their work.

Mr. Mahdavian began contributing his work to The New Yorker in February of 2018. My thanks to him for allowing use of his photo.

________________________________________________________________

Barry Blitt Is Pulitzered

A hearty congratulations to New Yorker cover artist and cartoonist Barry Blitt, (and fellow New Yorker contributor Ben Taub) on being awarded the Pulitzer yesterday.  Read about both here on the magazine’s website.

And here’s a short video via The New Yorker showing some of Mr. Blitt’s work.

Here’s Mr. Blitt’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barry Blitt  Born in Montreal. New Yorker work: January 10, 1994 -. His first contribution to the magazine was a cover, one of many to come for the magazine. His cover, “Politics of Fear” for the issue of July 21, 2008 was and remains a cause celebre. His first cartoon appeared December 18, 2006. Website: barryblitt.com Mr. Blitt’s Wikipedia entry (with personal and professional history).

________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ellis Rosen on losing track of time. Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…And Yesterday’s

Alone with one’s demons by Brooke Bourgeois, who began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2019.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 11, 2020: Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

The Cover: The ninth coronavirus-themed cover out of the last ten issues. Here’s a Q&A with cover artist, Christoph Mueller.

From the Dept. of Broken Records: sorry, but do New Yorker covers really need titles? This one would be fine standing all by itself.

The Cartoonists:

Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

In a departure for the Monday Tilley Watch, I’m going to talk about just one of this week’s cartoonists, and his garage-centric drawings. When one thinks of New Yorker car drawings, there are at least two possible candidates that come readily to mind: the late great Joe Mirachi* and the singularly sensational soon-to-be-94 year old George Booth.  As you see in the above list of this week’s contributing cartoonists, Mr. Booth leads off the issue. What a kick to see this cartoon! What fun! The drawing is of a garage mechanic telling a customer, “We found a dangling participle in your carburetor, Professor.”  In Mr. Booth’s fifty-one year history of contributing to The New Yorker, his garage mechanic drawings rank up there with, among others, his guy in the claw-foot bathtub, his cave people and, of course, his dog and cat drawings.

When I think about New Yorker artists who have been with the magazine for some time — Mr. Booth’s first appeared in 1969 — I’m always curious to see when it was that one of their special interests began. With Booth, it didn’t take long at all for his first car mechanic cartoon to appear.  Below is his third New Yorker drawing (it appeared in the issue of March 7, 1970).

I don’t have access to an up-to-the minute accounting of Booth’s New Yorker work, so I’m unable to give an accounting of how many garage mechanic drawings the magazine’s published (if you type in “car” on the magazine’s database in association with George Booth’s name, 65 results are returned. But the database is good only up to February 14, 2005). Here are just a few of Booth’s classic additions to The New Yorker‘s cartoon car canon, beginning with a favorite from January 13, 1973.

 

And from March 25, 1974:

Finally, this beauty from May 27, 1991:

It’s tempting to remark on the detail you see in all of Booth’s repair shop drawings, but heck, detail has been Booth’s middle name throughout his more than eight hundred-and-fifty cartoons published thus far. His love of the scene found inside (and outside) the garage is obvious — all those golden graphic opportunities. We are fortunate Booth finds the elements in and around the shop worthy of pen and ink examination: the mechanics themselves in their well-worn grease-splotched coveralls, and then of course, the puzzled customers and their cars (what great cars!) and the ever-present Booth cats (and/or dogs).

I’ve spent a lot of time waiting in auto repair shops; it’s always a bit of a Boothian experience, looking around, noting the “stuff” — seeing it as Booth sees it. I owe George Booth plenty for his love of capturing the car shop — it clearly inspired my repair shop drawings, and “inspired” is putting it mildly as is clear in the below drawing of mine from The New Yorker issue of December 24, 1984.

Hats and caps off to Booth!

 

* Below: a Joe Mirachi New Yorker car cartoon, published November 24, 1986

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Bob Eckstein’s Cartoon Newsletter, “The Bob”; The Tilley Watch Online, April 26 – May 1, 2020; Like Links?

______________________________________________________________

Bob Eckstein’s Newsletter, “The Bob”

Here’s a fun (and free!) cartoon-centric newsletter. Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007, generously provides more than a good handful of his cartoons, and then some.

Subscribe here to The Bob.

Among Mr. Eckstein’s many pursuits [see below] is editing a series of cartoon collections*, all published by Princeton Architectural Press: The Ultimate Cartoon Book of  Book Cartoons, Everyone’s A Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book, and the forthcoming All’s Fair In Love And War: The Ultimate Cartoon Book.

Here’s Bob Eckstein’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Bob Eckstein (photo above courtesy of the artist) Born, New York, NY, Feb. 27 1963. New Yorker work: July 2007 – Author of The History of the Snowman (Simon & Schuster, 2007) and Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments From Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers (Penguin Random House, 2016). New Yorker work: 2007 -. Website: www.bobeckstein.com/

*Full disclosure: my work appears in this series.

Mr. Eckstein’s squirrel drawing above appeared as a Daily Cartoon on newyorker.com, March 27, 2020. 

__________________________________________

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features, April 26 -May 1, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, David Ostow, Christopher Weyant, Hilary Allison, Sam Marlow

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman (with Jessica Dellfino), Caitlin Cass, Eugenia Viti

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Really Enhanced Interrogation”

__________________________________________________________

Like Links?

If you like links as much as I do you might enjoy The Comics Journal’s weekly round-up compiled by Clark Burscough. There are no New Yorker cartoonists mentioned in this week’s post (sorry if I missed someone; cover artist Chris Ware is mentioned tho), it’s fun to see what’s happening outside the New Yorker cartoon beltway.