Travels With Walter Groovy: Joe Dator & Friend In Japan; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Sipress

Joe Dator, fresh off his win at the NCSFest (he won in the category of Best In Gag Cartoons), headed to Japan with his traveling companion, Walter Groovy.  I asked Mr. Dator to talk a little about Mr. Groovy:

Well, he’s the doughy balding middle aged man who shows up in my cartoons quite a bit, enough so that I gave him a name. I took him to Australia in 2017, he was with me at the Reuben Awards in CA last week, and I’m probably taking him with me to Italy later this year. 

Mr. Dator added: “If he looks a little different, it’s because he’s a special version I dubbed “Konnichi-Groovy.'”

Above: Konnichi-Groovy and Mr. Dator — on the right, Mr. Dator with Mr. Groovy at the NCSFest

Mr. Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.  Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Politics and UFOs, courtesy of David Sipress, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

 

Peter Arno’s Nakedly Serious Drawing; The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 3, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The above drawing by Peter Arno that appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of October 7, 1939 was a significant departure for an artist who is mostly remembered for his drawings of cafe society types.  As I wrote in Arno’s biography, “Though Arno’s drawings would revisit the subject of war in the coming years, his work would never again be so nakedly serious.”

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The Cover: Barry Blitt’s shoe shine cover, addressed here last week, has made media waves.  I’m re-posting a link to the brief piece wherein Mr. Blitt talks about his cover.

The Cartoonists:

Record Keeping: 14 of the 21 issues of The New Yorker published thus far this year have contained a debut drawing. This week Johnny DiNapoli enters the stable of artists. The record for new cartoonists was 2016, when 15 were brought in. As we’re still in May, that record will no doubt fall. Mr. DiNapoli is the 40th new cartoonist to debut since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017. 

For those who like numbers it’s interesting to recognize the remarkable increase in the number of cartoonists in the magazine’s stable. During Lee Lorenz’s 24 year tenure (1973 – 1997) as Art/Cartoon editor he brought in approximately 50 new cartoonists (or roughly 2 a year).  His successor (1997-April of 2017) brought in approximately 130 in 20 years (or approximately 6-7 a year). The current pace (40 cartoonists in 2 years) means the average has leaped to 20 new cartoonists a year.

Still Missing: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below) was removed in the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

A New Yorker Memorial Day Cover from 1965

Looking at Memorial Day covers in The Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker 1925-1989 this morning, this fabulous piece by Arthur Getz jumped out. 

Here’s Mr. Getz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913; died, 1996. New Yorker work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published, and one cover). According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

 

An Early-Release Blitt Cover; The Latest Case For Pencils Spotlights Karl Stevens; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Brendan Loper

An Early-Release Blitt Cover

The New Yorker sometimes gets the itch to early-release a cover (under normal circumstances we usually don’t see the next cover til the wee hours of Monday morn). Here’s the latest example of a cover that just couldn’t wait (it’s by Barry Blitt). Read about it here.

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Case For Pencils Spotlights Karl Stevens

Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog, A Case For Pencils returns with a look at Karl Stevens’s tools of the trade.

See it here!

Mr. Stevens first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in January of this year.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Brendan Loper on holiday beach couture. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in  2016.