Liza Donnelly At SXSW 2020; Peter Kuper In Conversation; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Liza Donnelly, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in 1982, is scheduled to appear at SXSW 2020.  Info here. Link to her website here.

Ms. Donnelly’s  Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists And Their Cartoons (Promethius) is a must have for every fan of New Yorker cartoons.

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Peter Kuper In Conversation Monday, November 4th

Celebrating the release of Heart Of Darkness, Peter Kuper will be at Shakespeare & Company this coming Monday (November 4th) at 7pm in conversation with Jeremy Dauber. Info here.

And later next week:

Mr. Kuper will be at Greenlight Books 686 Fulton Street, Brooklyn. Thursday, November 7, 2019

7:30 PM. Info here.

Link here to Mr. Kuper’s website.  Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Ali Solomon, who began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018, on marathon watching.

 

Boo!

Happy Halloween!

Here’s a rejected cover submitted to The New Yorker ages and ages ago (sometime in the 1980s) and brought out here on previous Halloweens (what can I say? I like cupcakes). While this one wasn’t green-lighted, another of my Halloween covers was accepted (by then New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb, with Lee Lorenz as art editor). Unfortunately that one was a casualty of Tina Brown’s hiring (she “killed” it, along with droves of other bought material by an assortment of the magazine’s artists).

Anyway, it’s always fun to connect Halloween with baked goods. Heck, it’s fun to connect baked goods with any day of the year.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Karen Sneider witches brew. Ms. Sneider began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

 

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Addams On Halloween

Can’t not mention Charles Addams on this spooky day. It’s a lot of fun having so much Addams in the news lately due to the just released Addams Family animated film. But even without the film, The Addams Family remains a fixture in our culture.  As a student of New Yorker cartoons I never tire of sitting down and looking through any one of his anthologies. The care he put into his work is inspirational.  Each cartoon seems a gem, perfectly (and I’d guess lovingly) constructed. Addams was never my cartoon guru (Thurber is), but I learned more than I’ll ever know from his work.

 

For more on Addams, read Linda Davis’s biography, and go to the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation website.

Above: Chas Addams Monster Rally was published in 1950 by Simon & Schuster

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Rejected New Yorker Cover Of The Week; The Halloween Dailies (Shouts & Cartoon); 37 Reasons To Buy This Cartoon Collection

Rejected New Yorker Cover of The Week

One of the best there is, John Cuneo, recently posted this rejected New Yorker cover submission. See more of Mr. Cuneo’s work on Instagram; see his published New Yorker cover art here.

— My thanks to John Cuneo for allowing me to Spill it.

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The Halloween Dailies (Shouts & Cartoon)

Shouts:  Ali Fitzgerald’s “America!: Halloween Costumes For People Who Can’t Stop Reading The News”

Ellis Rosen & Colin Stokes’s  “The Headless Horseman Tries Out Some Halloween Looks”

Cartoon:  Johnny DiNapoli’s Monster Mash

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37 Reasons To Buy This Cartoon Collection

Everyone’s A Critic, out now and available wherever great cartoon collections are sold, is loaded — Loaded! — with some of the very best single panel (i.e. New Yorker) cartoonists on the planet, and off.

 

Janis Joplin’s Thurber; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); Donnelly At The College Of New Jersey; Fave Photo Of The Day

Janis Joplin’s Thurber

From the Dept Of I Didn’t See This Coming:

Reading through Dwight Garner’s New York Times review of the new Janis Joplin biography, “Janis,” by Holly George- Warren:

“She named a dog Thurber, after James Thurber, the New Yorker humor writer.”

— left: Thurber and Ms. Joplin

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From Barbara Smaller, a familiar face on a Jack-O-Lantern.

Ms. Smaller began contributing to The New Yorker in 1996.

…and yesterday’s two Daily Cartoons (there was a bonus):

Kim Warp’s Bonus Daily on America’s Pastime.  Ms. warp has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1999. Visit her website here.

and Ellis Rosen on a dog, a cat, and a pumpkin. Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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Liza Donnelly At The College Of New Jersey

From The Signal, October 28, 2019, “Donnelly Shares Work With Students”

Ms. Donnelly’s  first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1982.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A photo borrowed from Steve Meyer’s Facebook page showing (l-r) Drew Friedman, Robert Crumb, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and Peter Bagge at last night’s “Weirdo Comes To Columbia.” The event was hosted by Columbia’s Karen Green, and moderated by Jon B. Cooke.

Mr. Friedman, Mr. Crumb, and Ms. Kominsky-Crumb have all contributed to The New Yorker.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 4, 2019

The Cover: Without heading to the Table Of Contents and reading the title for this cover I’m going to guess it’s a comment on city noise. I’ve always felt New Yorker covers should work stand alone, without explanation, or description. This was the practice until Tina Brown’s revamp of the magazine, beginning with the issue of October 5, 1992.

Okay, now to the Table of Contents and the cover’s title: “Noise New York.”

There’s a hint of Steinberg on the cover; the police car beams of flashing lights for instance. Below left, a detail from Steinberg’s March 13, 1978 New Yorker cover, and to the right, a detail from this week’s cover (by Richard McGuire).

 

 

 

 

If you want to read more about Mr. McGuire’s cover, go here.

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the Cartoons & Cartoonists:

So yay! A lot of cartoonists. If we count the two teams (Sofia Warren & J.A.K., and Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby) as one cartoonist per drawing, there are twenty-one contributors.

There’s a newbie: Luke Kruger-Howard, who is the twenty-fourth new member of the magazine’s stable of cartoonists this year and the fiftieth newbie under Emma Allen’s editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

There are four bedroom cartoons in the issue: one by Victoria Roberts (page 46), one by the aforementioned Mr. Kruger-Howard (p. 23), one by Will McPhail (p. 36), and one by the aforementioned team of Guerra & Boothby (p. 70). Victoria Roberts’ three little pigs in bed drawing is both funny and touching.  It’s become an instant favorite Roberts cartoon.

Paul Noth has a fine colorful cartoon on page 50.  As mentioned here a number of times, it’s the cartoons that surprise that catch my attention (and often my affection). This is an out-of-left-field drawing that surprises. What more could one ask for.

P.C. Vey specializes in out-of-left-field drawings. His hikers (p. 54) don’t disappoint. I love everything about this drawing, especially the unseen co-hikers’ name (“the Jensons”). Someone ought to frame the original and hang it on a wall.

One can’t see Karl Stevens “Casablanca” drawing (p.39) without recalling others. A quick search on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank turned up five (it’s possible there are more):

Bob Eckstein’s from November 30, 2015

This classic from  Sam Gross, published February 11, 2008

A duo effort by Emily Flake & Rob Kutner, published October 16, 2017 

One by the late great Al Ross, published February 2, 1987.

And this fun one by Julia Suits, published October 30, 2017

 

High on my favorite things to draw are dogs and clouds. It’s only natural then that I’d be partial to a drawing that combines both, such as Amy Hwang’s cartoon on page 31 (her poodles are ever-so-slightly Gahan Wilsonesque).

I can’t see a cloud-based New Yorker drawing — heck, I can’t see clouds — without thinking of Charles Addams’ classic cover of May 19, 1975.

 

Lastly, I appreciate the challenge presented by aerial view drawings such as Sofia Warren & J.A.K’s joint effort on page 28. The last one I recall seeing was this one by David Borchart, published  February 22, 2016.  Then there is this spectacular dizzying cover from Adolph Kronengold, published September 22, 1928.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

Sadly, Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead drawing (below) remains mothballed. It was replaced by a redraw in 2017 after appearing 92 years.  Read about it here.