Book On The Horizon: Tom Gauld’s Mind-Blowing Theories; De Seve’s Two Right Feet; Shannon Wheeler’s Deleted Trump Tweets Etsy Offering; Case For Pencils Spotlights Mary Lawton; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Coming in April 2020, from Drawn & Quarterly, Department of Mind-Blowing Theories by New Yorker cover artist, Tom Gauld. More info here from the publisher.

Mr. Gauld’s most recent New Yorker cover below right.

 

 

 

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Peter De Seve’s Two Left Feet

 Check out Peter De Seve’s hot dog guy’s left foot. 

Here’s a short piece on Mr. De Seve and the cover (but not the two right feet). 

 

 

 

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Shannon Wheeler’s Deleted Trump Tweets Etsy Offering

Here’s an interesting offer from Shannon Wheeler via Etsy.  Check it out here.

Mr. Wheeler began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

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Case For Pencils Spotlights Mary Lawton

Jane Mattimoe’s always fascinating Case For Pencils shows us Mary Lawton’s tools of the trade. See it here!

Ms. Lawton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017 after “nearly thirty years” of rejections. . Above: from Ms. Mattimoe’s blog, a peek into Ms. Lawton’s album of rejection slips.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

J.A.K. on Disney’s Mickey.

Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

From The Archive: A Ross Perot New Yorker Cartoon; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist; The Village Voice & MAD

I haven’t done a whole lot of (obviously) political cartoons over the years. A Supreme Court drawing in the very early 1980s and a Bill Clinton drawing in the early 1990s come readily to mind.  Ross Perot, the two-time Presidential candidate who died today at age 89, was a humor magnet. Like so many other of the magazine’s cartoonists ( including Lee Lorenz, Liza Donnelly, James Stevenson, Peter Steiner, Arnie Levin, Mick Stevens, Dana Fradon, J.B. Handelsman, and Jack Ziegler) I couldn’t resist having a graphic go at him. The below appeared in The New Yorker issue of May 27, 1996.

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Beach reading by Ellis Rosen, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit his

website here.

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The Village Voice & Mad

 

From The Village Voice, July 9, 2019, “MAD Magazine: Eclipsed By Madness? Looking Back On The Publication That Endowed America With a B. S. Detector”  — this piece by Jeoffrey O’Brien on MAD in The Voice over the years.

MAD’s New Yorker Cartoonists; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A Daily Shouts By Julia Wertz

Mad’s New Yorker Cartoonists

With MAD sadly all but expiring later this summer I thought it would be a good time to begin building a list of New Yorker  cartoonists who joined MAD’s “usual gang of idiots.”  So here we go, in no particular order (unless the list grows long). 

****New Yorker folks out there who I’ve missed, please write to me so I can add you (I know I’m missing a number of you)**** 

Peter Porges

John Caldwell

Peter Kuper

Teresa Burns Parkhurst

Bob Eckstein

Joe Dator

Lars Kenseth

  P.C. Vey

Tom Cheney

Sara Lautman

Ward Sutton

Felipe Galindo

Glen LeLievre

Jason Chatfield,

Emily Flake

Shannon Wheeler

Pia Guerra

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

So much pressure, by Ali Soloman, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018. More work here. 

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A Daily Shouts by Julia Wertz

“Conversations With Ma: Mad About Mars And Movies”

Ms. Wertz has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2015.  More work here.

 

How Much Is That Doggie In The New Yorker Cartoon? $8.00

How much is that doggie in The New Yorker cartoon? Apparently, it’s 8 dollars.  In a sign-of-the-times first, a New Yorker contributor is publicly selling space in his upcoming New Yorker cartoon. Paul Karasik, whose July 4th Facebook post appears below, has raffled off a piece of his creation for cash. Mr. Karasik sold the drawing just a few weeks ago (the drawing has yet to appear in the magazine).  I know, I know, you’re wondering when I’ll say something “clever” like Mr. Karasik has gone to the dogs…

 

 

 

Some Favorite Summertime New Yorker Covers

This hot and humid long 4th of July weekend makes me think of specific favorite summertime New Yorker covers. The choices are good and plenty when one decides to select a few favorites from the magazine’s 94 years; for every one shown here, there are at least five more that fall into the fave category — these half dozen are but a fraction of the magazine’s superb summertime covers.

It’s perhaps worth noting that each of the artists below contributed both cartoons and covers to The New Yorker. They all hail from the pre-Tina Brown days when more than 60% of the magazine’s covers were contributed by its cartoonists (a reasonable guess would be that the % now of the magazine’s cartoonists contributing covers is somewhere in the low single digits).

This August 4th 1945 Mary Petty cover has always been a first thought when summer arrives.  The simple quiet moment Ms. Petty gives us during a particularly horrendous moment in history has always fascinated me. This scan doesn’t do justice to Ms. Petty’s watercolors.

Whenever I think of summertime and beaches I think of this Ludwig Bemelmans July 13, 1946  cover. Most will think of Mr. Bemelmans and immediately recall his Madeline books, but his contribution of 32 New Yorker covers was substantial

Here’s a beauty by Anatol Kovarsky from August 2, 1969. If you look through Mr. Kovarsky’s New Yorker covers you’ll see he often returned to aerial views. I’ve always found it amusing that he focused here on the parking lot, with the beach and ocean as supporting players.

Charles Addams’s cover shown below was published the very next week after Mr. Kovarsky’s. It reminds me of the summers during the years I lived in Manhattan, especially the days I headed up to The New Yorker‘s office to drop off my weekly batch of cartoons. The city never seemed hotter, the sidewalks never stickier, the non-air conditioned subway cars never sootier, than on those trips between my apartment in Greenwich Village and 25 West 43rd Street.

 

There are so many wonderful New Yorker baseball covers, but this one by Garrett Price is a particular favorite. 

Finally, this spectacular July 4th 1953 cover by Alajalov.

Here are the Spill’s A-Z entries for each of the above artists. 

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty  Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

Ludwig Bemelmans  Born, April 27, 1898. Died, October 1, 1962. New Yorker work: contributed six cartoons and thirty-two covers as well written pieces in a New Yorker career that began in October of 1937 and lasted until August 1962. He achieved lasting fame with his Madeline childrens books.

 

 

Anatol Kovarsky (photo: NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) New Yorker work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

 

 

Charles Addams  Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

Garrett Price ( Photo Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born, 1897, Bucyrus, Kansas. Died, April, 1979, Norwalk, Conn. Collection: Drawing Room Only / A Book of Cartoons (Coward -McCann, 1946). New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.

 

 

Constantin Alajalov  Born Constantin Aladjalov, 1900, Rostov-on-the-Don, Russia. Died Oct., 1987, Amenia, New York. New Yorker work: 1926 -1960. Perhaps best known for his New Yorker covers ( he also supplied cover art to other publications). Key collection: Conversation Pieces (The Studio Publications Inc., 1942) w/ commentary by Janet Flanner. A profile from The Saturday Evening Post.