Thurber Thursday (Personal History); Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; More Spills: Solomon, JAK

Thurber Thursday

When I moved to Greenwich Village in late 1977, renting an apartment on West 11th Street, I’d no idea how near I was living to the once home of James Thurber — the fellow whose work brought me to the big city. In the photo above (thanks Google!) the grey and yellow-paneled modern building all the way to the right at 65 West 11th Street, was the location of Thurber’s home in the late 1920s (1928, according to  Harrison Kinney’s excellent Thurber biography, James Thurber: His Life and Times, Henry Holt, 1995). Thurber and his wife moved to West 11th from their Horatio Street apartment [anyone have an address for Thurber’s Horatio apartment? Neither Kinney nor Bernstein’s biographies have it]. The building that housed Thurber’s apartment was replaced by the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in the late 1950s.

Just past the yellow school crossing sign, at the corner of 6th and West 11th, there was a magazine store. It was at that corner, back in April of 1977, that I opened the latest issue of The New Yorker to see my name listed for the first time. Quite a moment. My apartment was on the other side of 6th, a few doors past what once was (the fabulous) Ray’s Pizza (Ray’s was on the NW corner of 6th and West 11th, street level in the red brick building you see beyond the yellow school crossing sign).

Years later I came to learn how many New Yorker folks lived on West 11th.  Here’s a close-up of the street from the Ink Spill map of The New Yorker’s New York, posted in 2013. I had some sliver of interaction with all of these folks, except, of course, Thurber, and Ross, who died before I was born. Peter DeVries “fixed” one of my earliest captions (he was, at the time I began at the magazine, a caption doctor); I lived in the same building as Donald Barthelme, in the apartment just above his; courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I met, sat next to, and listened to Steinberg in the garden of the apartment building (as you see on the map snippet, he once actually lived in an apartment on the corner of 6th and West 11th); also courtesy of Mr. Barthelme, I spent some time chatting with Grace Paley at a Barthelme party; walked past S.J. Perelman on Carmine Street, but was too afraid (or intimidated, or whatever) to introduce myself. Just walking past him was experience enough.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Adam Douglas Thompson on Waldo & distancing. Mr. Thompson began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2019

 

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…From Submittable, March 18, 2020, “5 Literary Cartoons By Ali Solomon” Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

…From Believer Magazine, March 18, 2020, “The Coffee Isn’t Even Bitter: A Comic” by Jason Adam Katzenstein. Mr. K. has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014.

The Wednesday Watch: Playboy Will End Its Print Edition; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Playboy Will End Its Print Edition

From WWD, March 18, 2020, “Playboy Magazine Ceases Print Edition After 66 Years”

The magazine’s Spring 2020 issue will be its last print edition. An online edition will continue (the magazine says “special” issues may appear next year).  For many years, in the latter part of the Golden Age of Cartoons, as magazines that carried cartoons failed, Playboy emerged as the next best market (after The New Yorker), pay-wise, for single panel cartoonists. Like The New Yorker, the magazine had an anchor stable of artists, some of them on contract. In recent years the magazine dropped cartoons, and then brought some back.

Here’s further reading on  Hugh Hefner, aspiring cartoonist turned Playboy founder.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Getting to know you, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“How I Wish To Receive Notifictions” by Emily Flake, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.

Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s); Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch

   Cartoonist Mike Lynch has posted two back-to-back New Yorker items of interest on his blog. Today’s is a look at some of Steinberg’s drawings from All In Line (the 1947 paperback edition), and yesterday a piece on a film about New Yorker cover artist Andre Francois. See them here.

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

Andre Francois’s entry on the A-Z:

Andre Francois (photo: 1978) Birth/death information from his New York Times obit of April 15, 2005: Born Andre Farkas, 1915, Timisoara. Died, April, 2005, Grisy-les-Platres, France.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Emily Bernstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year, on shopping now. Yesterday’s Daily was by Emily Flake, who began contributing to the magazine in 2007.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts

A trio effort by cartoonist Jeremy Nguyen, along with writers Irving Raun, and Julia Edelman. Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 23, 2020: No GOAT

The Cover: This week’s cover, by Christoph Niemann is right on the money. The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, has a Q&A with the artist here.

Historical Note:  this is the first issue of The New Yorker  not to include a Goings On About Town section. A notice appears on this week’s Table of Contents.

A potted history of GOAT (as it’s sometimes affectionately called)

The very first issue of The New Yorker  included a “conscientious calendar of events worth while” called Goings On.  The very first Goings On was just one page, near the back of the book. Below is the heading of that first Goings On.

The Goings On heading survived up through the issue of October 31, 1925. Goings On About Town was used for the very first time in the next issue (November 7, 1925). Goings On About Town was moved to the very front of the magazine in the issue of January 23, 1926.

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And now back to the present…and this week’s issue.

The Cartoonists:

Once again, I’ve posted the entire listing of artists as this week’s Spots are by the fab cover artist, Marcellus Hall.

There is a newbie this week: Matilda Borgstrom, who is the third new cartoonist to enter The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists this year, and the fifty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

The Cartoons:

There are, as you would expect, a number of cartoons (“Drawings”) this week reflecting directly or indirectly the times we’re in: Roz Chast’s store front sign referencing hand sanitizer and face masks, Frank Cotham’s castle cleaning crew, Liza Donnelly’s kitchen full of fermented food, Emily Flake’s monster coming out of a closet.

The remaining cartoons take us away for awhile– as we’d want them to; the variety includes a mermaid, a couple of cowboys, a typing kitty, stargazers…and more.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Virus, or no virus, the watch continues. Read about Mr. Irvin’s moth-balled iconic Talk masthead here.

Here’s what we’re no longer seeing:

 

 

Who Are These New Yorker Cartoonists?

Cartoon Sleuths! Who Are These New Yorker Cartoonists?

The Spill has been around over a decade, and in that time I’ve spent many happy hours searching for information about the large number of New Yorker cartoonists who have zero biographical content on this site’s A-Z.  In an effort to fill in some of the empty biographies, I’m reaching out to the cartoon detectives out there who might know something/anything about the cartoonists listed below. You’ll see I’ve listed them in alphabetical order, but only up to the C’s. I don’t want to overwhelm by listing every single unknown cartoonist — we’ll get to them another week.

All of the cartoonists below belong to the Spill‘s One Club (identified by the red top-hatted fellow). That means they were only published once in the magazine. You’ll notice as well that most of them were published early in the magazine’s history. Those two factors (and sometimes only an initial for a first name) are obviously what makes searching difficult. It may be we’ll never know anything about these cartoonists, other than their one drawing in The New Yorker  — but wouldn’t it be great to know at least a little more. I should add that all of these names came out of the now ancient database that accompanied The Complete New Yorker.  It may be there are inaccuracies, which, of course, makes things even more interesting.

Update:

Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery has located info on Oscar Cesare. David Pomerantz has located info on Lou Byrnes. My thanks to them!  I’m removing Mr. Cesare’s name and Mr. Byrnes’ name from the list below and added some of the incoming info about them to the A-Z along with a link to fuller biographies.

Bob Barnes New Yorker work: 1 drawing: March 6, 1948

H. Barnes New Yorker work: 1 drawing: February 2, 1929

A. Bloomberg New Yorker work: 1 drawing,  September 20, 1930

Herb Breneman New Yorker work: one drawing, June 22, 1929

Jerry Capa NYer work: one drawing, April 26, 1976

D. T. Carlisle NYer work: one drawing, July 23, 1938

H.H. Caviedes New Yorker work: one drawing, May 28, 1938

P. Chapman New Yorker work: one drawing, April 10, 1926

H. M. Charleton New Yorker work: December 21, 1929