Blitt’s Hawking Tribute in The Paris Review; New Yorker State of Mind’s Latest Post (with a Cartoonist Mystery);

Barry Blitt’s Hawking Tribute in the Paris Review

Here’s Barry Blitt not on the cover of The New Yorker. 

And here’s Mr. Blitt’s entry on the A-Z:

 

 

 

Barry Blitt (above) Born in Montreal. New Yorker work: January 10, 1994 -. His first contribution to the magazine was a cover, one of many to come for the magazine. His cover, “Politics of Fear” for the issue of July 21, 2008 was and remains a cause celebre. His first cartoon appeared December 18, 2006. Website: barryblitt.com Mr. Blitt’s Wikipedia entry (with personal and professional history).

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New Yorker State of Mind’s Latest Post (with a Cartoonist Mystery)

One of my favorite blogs returns with a look at the issue of March 2, 1929. The beautiful cover (above) is by Adolph K. Kronengold, who (according to The Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker: 1925- 1989 ) contributed 22 covers to the magazine between 1928 through 1947.  I can find just two mentions of Mr. Kronengold in the New York Times archive: as having an exhibit of paintings in the Lounge Gallery of the Eighth Street Playhouse in March of 1936,  and as an instructor in “commercial art and cartooning” at the Westchester Workshop in September of 1938.  Anyone have more?

This scant info leads me to the mystery cartoonist noted on the current New Yorker State of Mind post (the cartoon appears below).  The New Yorker State of Mind blogger is asking for help ID-ing the artist (as I love a mystery, I’d love to know too). The drawing is incorrectly attributed to I. Klein in the Complete New Yorker database, and the name does not show up in the general index in the database.  It also does not appear in the Index for The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker. An online search turned up zippo results. I used various search configurations, such as the name + illustrator, or  name +artist, name +cartoonist, or just the name solo. I also tried the name as “Kindl” instead of “Kindol.” If anyone out there has a solution, please pass it along. I’d like nothing more than to add this cartoonist to the Spill‘s A-Z.

Here’s the cartoon from the issue:

 

 

One comment

  1. I’m going to guess this is another pseudonym for I. Klein, just like P. Panurge–apparently a reference to Rabelais–which I commented on in your November 23, 2013 post. Kinol is close to an anagram for Klein, or it could be Kindl, a Yiddish word for children. Perhaps Klein’s children had something to do with the gag, or he’s just having fun referring to his children in the drawing, like Hirschfeld’s much later Nina. As this might well be the second example in the database of Klein using a false name, I don’t think there’s a need to search for a new mystery cartoonist with a preposterous surname.

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