Fave Photo Of The Day: Zoomin’ New Yorker Cartoonists; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…and Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; The Holiday Daily Cartoonists

One of the things cartoonists like to do, besides work on cartoons, is gather with other cartoonists. Here’s a crew of Zoomin’ New Yorker cartoonists that gathered yesterday: from top left, going clockwise: Robert Leighton, Bob Eckstein, Ken Krimstein, and Pat Byrnes.

Mr. Leighton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002; Bob Eckstein in 2007;

Ken Krimstein in 2000; Pat Byrnes in 1998.

— My thanks to Bob Eckstein for the screen grab.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…and The Holiday Daily Cartoonists:

Today’s: Eugenia Vita (with Ginny Hogan): “Initial Interpretations Of Quarantine Terms Before I Knew What They Meant”Eugenia Viti has contributed cartoons to The New Yorker since June of last year.

The Holiday Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Sofia Warren with “How My Misdirected Feelings Have Come Out Lately”…Ms. Warren has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist:

Today’s: Amy Hwang on the calendar these days.

Ms. Hwang has contributed to The New Yorker since 2010.

The Holiday Daily Cartoonist: Johnny DiNapoli, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2019.

Alan Dunn’s New Yorker Honor Roll; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 1, 2020

Above: The New Yorker War Cartoons  1945 Special Edition For The Armed Forces.  For more on The New Yorker‘s special war editions go here.

The  above War Cartoons cover by Alan Dunn originally appeared on The New Yorker issue of August 11, 1945. Nearly a year later Mr. Dunn revisited the Honor Roll with this cover of July 27, 1946:

Mr. Dunn’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. NYer work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

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The Cover:

And on into June with another cover (we are told) reflecting this strange time. You might not know this cover was presented to us as timely without knowing the title (“Lockdown Sampler”). Without the title, in a different time, we would likely see this cover, as William Steig once defined (pre-Tina Brown) New Yorker covers, as a “special moment — fleetingly observed.”

Read a short Q&A with Roz Chast here about her cover.

 

The Cartoonists:

Two duo efforts in this issue, with one duo, Sophie Lucido Johnson (and, I’m taking a guess here on this link:) Sammi Skolmoski new to the cartoonist stable. The Spill custom is to count a duo as one new entry on the A-Z, which means the Johnson/Skolmoski duo are the 9th newbies so far this year, and the 62nd newbies brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship (begun in May of 2017).

The Cartoons: a number jump out for me — five to be exact. Curiously (or not) they appear in a row, beginning with Emily Flake’s clowns about to pie throw (perhaps my favorite Flake drawing ever), followed by Lars Kenseth’s airport baggage moment, then Danny Shanahan’s fab accessorized dinosaurs, Joe Dator’s E.T. bicycle rental scenario, and finally Farley Katz’s Sunset Boulevard-ish” Instagram drawing.

See the slideshow of this week’s drawings here (if you scroll down a bit).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Regular Spill visitors will recognize that every Monday Tilley Watch ends with the Irvin Talk Masthead Watch.  Mr. Irvin’s classic design is still missing (it went away in the Spring of 2017, replaced by a…gasp!…redraw…read about it here). Here’s Mr. Irvin’s mothballed classic design:

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, May 18-22, 2020; A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931; Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads; Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 18-22, 2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Jeremy Nguyen, David Sipress, Paul Noth, Ellis Rosen, Ali Solomon

Daily Shouts: Jason Chatfield (& Ethan Hall)

…and:

From the Culture Desk: Emily Flake’s “My Stupid Quarantine Body”

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Up and Inside”  & “Theatre Of The Absurd”

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931

One of the Spill‘s fave sites really goes to town with this particular installment. If you want to be carried away from 2020 for a bit, take a look.

Cover by Theodore Haupt, one of forty-four for the magazine.

As a sort of extra add-on to the NYSoM’s  “Tete-a-tete” section concerning Mr. Pulitzer’s fountain, here’s an Oct. 10, 2014 Spill entry

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Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads

Here’s a fun post from another Spill fave blog.  Attempted Bloggery looks at the Peter Arno Alemite campaign. See it all here.

[and wow! — just look at Arno’s composition in the ad shown above]

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Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

If you check out Amazon’s listing for the Bob Eckstein edited All’s Fair In Love & War (Princeton Architectural Press), you’ll be able to see 21 of the collected cartoons if you click on “Look Inside” and an additional 18 (with some duplications from “Look Inside”) if you click on the  array  of thumbnail cartoons shown below the cover.

Also shown on “Look Inside” is Mr. Eckstein’s introduction and the complete list of contributors. The book, the third in the Ultimate Cartoon Book series, comes out October 20th of this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoonist Event Of The Month: “Funny Ladies At The New Yorker” With Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, And Liana Finck In Conversation Via The Society Of Illustrators; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

From The Society of Illustrators, this news of a live online chat with Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, and Liana Finck, May 27th at 6:30.  All the info here.

Here are the Spill‘s entries for each of these fine cartoonists:

Roz Chast ( Photo: Bill Franzen) Born, Brooklyn, NY. New Yorker work: 1978 –. Key collection: Theories of Everything ( Bloomsbury, 2006). Her book, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir (Bloomsbury, 2014) was a National Book Awards finalist (nonfiction) in 2014.  Website

Liza Donnelly  Born, Washington, D.C.. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 –. Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005).  Donnelly is the innovator of a form of visual journalism, covering news and cultural events by digitally drawing them in real time and sharing them.  Website

 

Liana Finck ( Photo: John Madere) Born in 1986. New Yorker work: February 25, 2013 –. Studied at Cooper Union College, 2004 – 2008. Fulbright Fellowship to Brussels, 2009. Passing For Human was published in 2018 by Random House.  Website.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on escaping. Mr. Nguyen has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

Thurber Thursday: The Thurber Carnival Original Broadway Cast Soundtrack; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

When I first began collecting just about anything with Thurber’s name and/or drawings, coming across the above vinyl album was a big big deal. Not just because it’s a very fun “objet d’Thurber,” but the design delivers more than your typical soundtrack album: when you open the gatefold sleeve you find Thurber’s The Last Flower in its entirety.

The inner front and inner back covers are also well-designed.  If you’re a Thurber fan, you get your money’s worth.

The soundtrack, released in 1960, came out of the successful Broadway review, which came out of Thurber’s successful book, originally published in 1945.

The Last Flower  was published in 1939. According to Thurber’s second wife, Helen, it was her husband’s favorite of his own books (and E.B. White’s favorite Thurber book). Thurber famously claimed to have “finished” The Last Flower in an hour, following dinner at The Algonquin, adding “it took some three hours of course, to ink these drawings in.”*

 

Around here, in Spill headquarters, The Thurber Carnival (book) is referred to as “The Bible.” If I had to be marooned on a desert island, this is the book I’d want with me.

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

*According to Thurber’s second wife….and “It took some three hours…” From Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life And Times, p. 737.

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David Sipress on what one royal likes.

Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.