The Wednesday Spill: Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Takes You On A Tour Of Her Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Catching up on the week’s Daily Cartoons…

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Keith Knight on not watching the Mets. Mr. Knight began contributing to The New Yorker in December of last year. Visit his website here.

…Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Teresa Burns Parkhurst, on Disney’s re-opening. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in October 2017. See her New Yorker work here.

…Monday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Liz Montague on humans and an alien.  Ms. Montague began contributing in March of 2019. Visit her website here.

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Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Takes You On A Tour of Her Norman Rockwell Museum Exhibit

Here’s a 48 minute video of Liza Donnelly taking you through the just opened exhibit of her work at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

Above: a screen grab of Ms. Donnelly standing before her first New Yorker drawing.

Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited: Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic. She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

 

 

Henry Martin’s First New Yorker Spot Drawing

Some mornings, when I set out to do the day’s Spill, I’ve no idea what I’ll be posting (other than possibly mentioning the Daily cartoonist & cartoon). Today began with seeing a link to a 17 year old piece on Henry Martin, the great New Yorker cartoonist who passed away the last day of June. In the piece (there’s a link for it below), it mentions Henry’s first Spot drawing (shown here) — it was his first sale to the magazine — to be followed by fourteen years of trying to sell cartoons to them.

In the weeks following Henry’s passing I wondered what and where that first Spot was, but since Spots aren’t cataloged on The New Yorker‘s database, it would take searching issue-to-issue (a more involved approach would’ve taken me to the magazine’s library to sit with Henry’s black binder). The 17 year old article saved me a bit of work, narrowing down the search to the sale in April of 1950, and that his first Spot was a circus wagon.

  I began searching the digital library online, beginning with April 8, 1950 (figuring that if he sold the Spot in April, it would’ve been too late to get it into the April 1, 1950 issue). Bingo(!) on page four in the Goings On About Town Section. Lucky that — as the Spot may not have appeared for weeks, or months. This was probably my easiest archival dig ever.

What we know about Henry’s work method for Spots is that he drew them the size he thought they’d run in the magazine. So what you see above is probably just slightly larger than the original. The detail Henry got into that small piece is kind of, if not, amazing. I’ve included  a terrible screen shot of the April 8, 1950 Goings On About Town page, and a somewhat better grab below of half the page.

And here’s the article that led me to the Spot…

From PAW (Princeton Alumni Weekly)  July 3, 2003, “Laughing, Gently, For Half A Century” — this piece (with cartoons) on Henry Martin, who contributed to the publication.

And…here’s Henry Martin’s Spill A-Z entry:

 

 

Henry Martin ( Born 1925, Louisville, Kentucky. Died, June 30, 2020, Newtown, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: 1964 – 1999 . Collections: Good News / Bad News ( Scribners, 1977), Yak! Yak! Yak! Blah! Blah! Blah! (Scribners, 1977). Martin has illustrated a number of books, as well as writing and illustrating children’s books. Ink Spill’s Henry Martin Appreciation

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 20, 2020

 

Looking at the new issue I felt a bit like “Vacuum Man” from the Beatles animated film Yellow Submarine — you know, the creature who sucks up everything around it, including itself.  After what seemed like eternity during the double issue two week span, I was eager to in-take and take-in the cartoons.

Left: Vacuum Man is the guy pictured resting on the bookshelf (yes, I have a toy Vacuum Man — why not?).

The Cover: A serene cover from Richard McGuire.  I was thinking it works well now during this weird time we’re in, but it could also work anytime…so an evergreen. The horizontal pink ever so slightly recalls and reminds of the pink in the clouds on Rea Irvin’s classic first New Yorker cover, or maybe I’m just sensing things. Read Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with the artist here.

The Cartoonists:

A Henry Martin cartoon leads off the issue in recognition of Mr. Martin’s death the week before last. Read more about him here, here, and here.

Paperwork first: a newbie. Lucas Adams, is the eleventh new cartoonist added to the magazine’s stable this year and the sixty-fourth added since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

A number of this week’s cartoons caught my attention. I’ll begin with Bruce Eric Kaplan’s one influencer drawing (found on page 32). I begin with it because it elicited, from me, a rare out loud laugh. This isn’t to say I don’t usually laugh at good cartoons, I do — but generally it’s a perfectly acceptable inside laugh. Anyway, good stuff from Mr. Kaplan, one of our modern greats. …Barbara Smaller’s caption (on her drawing, page 20) is right up there as well. It reminds me, in general, of great captions by the likes of Lee Lorenz, Robert Weber, and Frank Modell.  Love it… Lars Kenseth’s eruption drawing (page 38)  is a hoot or a howl, or a hahaha– (you know what I mean)… Victoria Robert’s wash that man right out of my hair drawing (page 42) is terrific… really enjoyed Liana Finck’s shining armor drawing, as well as Ed Steed’s attacking hot dogs. Such good stuff… Further applause for P.C. Vey’s people on a desert island (the way he’s drawn the people: hysterical)… and Jeremy Nguyen’s panda drawing: my favorite Nguyen drawing ever (so far).

Lastly, really enjoyed Paul Noth’s bedtime story drawing. If anyone ever does a New Yorker Book Of Mob Cartoons, this is a natural for inclusion.

Here’s the magazine’s slideshow of the issue’s cartoons (seeing them in the magazine is really the better way to go, but if you’re in a hurry, this’ll do).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

The above was replaced by a redraw(!) in 2017… Read about Rea Irvin’s classic Talk heading here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: New Addition To The Spill Library; The Tilley Watch Online; Videos (And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

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New Addition To The Spill Library

Part of the Spill‘s (self charged) charge is to keep in mind all those cartoonists who have been and are part of The New Yorker, not just the names up in lights. Larry Reynolds, having contributed to several of the biggest magazines of his day (including Collier’s, and The Saturday Evening Post) also had three drawings in The New Yorker.  In the July 1st Spill post I showed you a collection of his ongoing character, Butch, who appeared in Collier’s.  Above is the only other example (to my knowledge) of Reynolds’ work in book form. Lines Of Least Resistance, published in 1941 by E.P. Dutton & company, Inc., contains work from all three of the magazines just mentioned as well as drawings from Elks Magazine.  If my count is correct, there are 24 of his drawings in the book, plus the cover and back cover (3 drawings found in the book).

In the drawing shown above you clearly see a Gluyas Williams influence in his work — old man Kelly and two of the other characters — the men — on the right side of the drawing could’ve been in a Gluyas Williams drawing. The fellow in the forefront right, smoking a pipe, and the man running just below the Pelham sign look similar to George Price’s style (especially the way Reynolds drew the running fellow’s legs).  Other drawings seem to carry a heavy influence of a number of other cartoonists. Look at the one below: shades of Syd Hoff and the early work of William Steig (even, a hint of a Helen Hokinson luncheon lady in the frame). I’m led to wonder if Reynolds ever quite settled on a look of his very own.

Larry Reynolds entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Larry Reynolds (Photo from I Feel Like A Cad, 1944; self portrait above right from Colliers Collects Its Wits, Harcourt Brace & Co., 1941) Born, Mt. Vernon, NY, c. 1912.  Died, March 4, 2002, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. New Yorker work: 3 drawings: Jan 7, 1939 / Feb 24, 1940 / April 6, 1940. Collection of Note: I Feel Like A Cad (drawings from Collier’s Weekly).  Link to Allan Holtz’s Reynold’s Stripper’s Guide Profile here.

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An end of week listing of New Yorker artists* who have contributed to newyorker.com features

July 6 -July 10, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Yasin Osman, Will Santino, Amy Kurzweil, John Cuneo, Patrick McKelvie, J.A.K.

Video: How To Draw A Child by Emma Allen** & Emily Flake

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

*For clarity, the names of artists who have not yet appeared in the print magazine are not bolded.

**Emma Allen is The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor

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Videos ( And An App) Of Interest: Liza Donnelly Exhibit At The Norman Rockwell Museum

Here are links to two videos that are part of the Liza Donnelly exhibit at The Norman Rockwell Museum (it opens to the public tomorrow).

This link takes you to a video of Donnelly talking about her live drawing.

And this link takes you to an in depth look at her career.

Also: there’s an app that features Donnelly speaking about individual pieces in the exhibit. See the video about it here.

Personal History: Attended Donnelly’s “virtual art opening” last night, except it wasn’t virtual for me — I was there. Watched as Donnelly (who besides being a colleague, is also my wife) gave a tour, being followed by a cameraman wielding a “live” camera and a photographer documenting the moment (the above photo was not taken by the photographer — it was taken by me with my flip-phone camera as the cartoonist spoke about her sketchbooks in the display case).

For me, the most touching piece on display is also, I believe, the most modest in scale — it may be the smallest piece in the exhibit. It’s the drawing that leaped Ms. Donnelly into The New Yorker;   the first drawing of hers bought, but not the first run. Though OKed (bought) in 1979, it did not run until the issue of November 22, 1982. I believe she speaks about it in the longer video I’ve linked to above.

Go see the exhibit, non-virtually, if you’re up that way. It’s a real treat.

 

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly’s Norman Rockwell Museum Virtual Opening Tonight!

                  “A Master Class In Using Humor”

                                                              — The Boston Globe, July 9, 2020

Here’s the notice from the Globe:

LIZA DONNELLY: COMIC RELIEF (NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM): Donnelly, a cartoonist and children’s book author, has been making wry, powerful cartoons for the New Yorker for more than 30 years. Don’t let the show’s name fool you: Charged with political awareness from feminism to Black Lives Matter, Donnelly’s career is a master class in using humor to heighten and amplify a dead-serious point of view.

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Here’re a few photos from Ms. Donnelly’s exhibit opening this Sunday. There’ll be a live virtual tour at 5:30 by the artist this evening on the Norman Rockwell Museum YouTube channel.