The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Interview Of Interest: Liana Finck; Cuneo At The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Interview Of Interest: Liana Finck

From Publishers Weekly, February 25, 2020, “Liana Finck on Pop-up Magazine and Taking Her Cartoons To the Stage”

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

 

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John Cuneo At The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium

A crowded room last night at the New School for John Cuneo‘s fab fun informative talk as part of Ben Katchor‘s New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium. Spotted in the crowd, besides, of course, Mr. Katchor: New Yorker cover artist Marcellus Hall, illustrator Joe Ciardiello, illustrator Chris Buzelli, illustrator Katherine Streeter, illustrator Stephen Kroninger, Ad Director Soojin Buzelli, photographer Deborah Feingold, New Yorker cartoonists Bob Eckstein, Robert Leighton, Evan Forsch, Carol Isaacs (aka The Surreal McCoy)*, and Attempted Bloggery‘s Stephen Nadler (who kindly provided the photos above).

*Carol Isaacs’s film The Wolf of Baghdad will be screened tomorrow night in NYC.  Info here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Politics, by Jon Adams. Mr. Adams has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

 

All New Yorker Cartoons Are New Yorker Drawings But Not All New Yorker Drawings Are New Yorker Cartoons; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

In a fun February 22nd 2020 post on The Daily Cartoonist celebrating the first appearance of James Thurber’s drawings in The New Yorker (shown above), the post’s author D.D. Degg wrote this:

There seems to be some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons. A New Yorker State of Mind, where the above screenshot comes from, calls them cartoons; whereas others disagree, calling them spot art. Cartoonist and New Yorker cartoon historian Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue (below).

To use language we’ve been hearing a lot of in Democratic debates: my name was invoked, so I would like to respond.

There really shouldn’t be “some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons.”  Using the New Yorker‘s language for referring to cartoons, in usage for 95 years, there are two ways one can go when referring to the magazine’s cartoons: you can call them cartoons, or you can call them drawings (and well yes, there’s a third descriptive:  some call them “art”). The magazine “officially” refers to them as drawings (you can see the designation on every Table Of Contents). There are three kinds of New Yorker cartoon formats: with a title (and that could mean a series of cartoons linked by a theme — all appearing in a spread. Booth, Ziegler, Levin, and Saxon, to name a few, were responsible for some terrific spreads over the years); with a caption; without a caption. I’ll show you three of mine as examples:

With a caption:

Without a caption:

With a title:

All of the above are cartoons, and they are also drawings. They all appeared in the magazine, surrounded in some part by text, but not linked to the text in any way other than graphic proximity. In Thurber’s Pet Department piece at the top of this post, the drawings are accompanying the text — the piece as a whole set off by a horizontal and vertical line. The seal, and the dog exist in Thurber’s piece to illustrate the text surrounding them. New Yorker cartoons, historically, do not reflect, or refer to, or illustrate the text surrounding them.  In Thurber’s Pet Department drawings there is no “one-two punch” with either drawing (according to Peter Arno, that one-two punch is an essential element of a New Yorker cartoon). The wonderful Thurber dog and seal, if removed from the accompanying text, and left on their own, would still be fun drawings (hey, they’re Thurber drawings after all). They might make us laugh; we may find it amusing that a seal is in a room with a table and lamp (I know I do). But if the drawings had been submitted as cartoons, sans accompanying text, I doubt the editors would’ve bought and run them as a stand alone drawing/cartoons (Spots maybe). There’s not enough cartoon there.

Another sliver from Mr. Degg’s post, referring specifically to Thurber’s dog and seal:

“…whereas others disagree, calling them spot art.”

New Yorker spot drawings are free range graphic pieces, not illustrating the text surrounding them (in modern times they sometimes do refer to an issue’s theme, if the issue is thematic), thus Thurber’s dog and seal are not New Yorker spot drawings.

Finally, Mr. Degg’s says:

“…Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue…”

My information concerning Thurber’s first New Yorker cartoon comes from Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography, published by Ohio State University Press in 1968. In all the years (close to 40 now) I’ve used this as a reference, I’ve yet to find an error.  While I heavily rely on Mr. Bowden’s good work, I also comb through back issues of The New Yorker.  In all of my combing, I’ve never found an earlier Thurber New Yorker cartoon than the one Mr. Bowden designated as the first ( that cartoon appeared in the issue of January 31, 1931).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on getting directions.

Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily: Avi Steinberg on a warm February.

Mr. Steinberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 2, 2020

The Cover: As mentioned last Friday, Barry Blitt‘s Bloomberg exploding cigar cover (above) was rush-released. Here’s a short piece about the cover’s subject by magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.

The Cartoonists

The Cartoons

A likely too-deep-in-the-weeds observation: I believe (someone please correct me if I’m wrong!) this is the first issue of the magazine in contemporary times composed fully of stable mates whose entry into the stable dates back no further than the early 1990s (Frank Cotham, who began contributing in 1993 is this week’s elder, with 27 years at The New Yorker). On the flip side, you might recall that the last issue of the magazine (the 95th anniversary issue) contained a drawing by Edward Koren, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. A deep (cartoonist) bench remains at The New Yorker.

Here’s the rundown of this week’s cartoonists, in order of their freshman year:

Frank Cotham (1993); William Haefeli (1998); David Sipress (1998); Joe Dator (2006); Julia Suits (2006); Emily Flake (2008); Amy Hwang (2010); Liana Finck (2013); Lars Kenseth (2016); Maggie Larson (2017); Liz Montague (2019).

Two cartoons in the issue that caught my attention both feature non-humans. David Sipress‘s stand-up kitty, and Joe Dator‘s opposum/possum. Also noted: Ed Steed‘s (sort’ve Ben Shahn-esque) full page illustration for Adam Levin’s fiction piece.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Read about Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead,shown directly below.  Below it is the redrawn version plugged-in Spring of 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The Magazine’s 6th Anniversary Issue; From Swann Galleries: The Rise Of Illustration Art In The Public Eye

A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At the Magazine’s 6th Anniversary Issue

A fave Spill blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker takes us deep into the magazine’s 6th anniversary issue.  Lots to see, to read. Enjoy!

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Of Interest: The Rise Of Illustration Art In The Public Eye

From Swann Galleries, this short piece “The Rise Of Illustration Art In The Public Eye” which includes a few recently auctioned pieces, including Charles Addams‘s so-called “movie scream” (above), Ludwig Bemelmans and Ilonka Karasz.

Looking ahead: It’s always fun browsing through Swann’s Illustration Art auction catalog at the New Yorker cartoons and covers up for grabs — we’ll have to wit til Spring though.