The Washington Post’s Dana Fradon Obit; Article Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist & Cartoonist Robert Kraus; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; The Asian Babies Exhibition Catalog

From The Washington Post,  “Dana Fradon, prolific New Yorker cartoonist with a satirical edge, dies at 97” by Harrison Smith. The piece includes a terrific photo of Mr. Fradon by Anne Hall Elser who was assistant to Lee Lorenz during his sterling run (1973- 1997) as the magazine’s art editor.

Above: a drawing by Mr. Fradon that appeared in The New Yorker March 22, 1969

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Article Of Interest: Robert Kraus

From The Ridgefield Press, October 19, 2019, “Ridgefield Notables: Robert Kraus, New Yorker Cartoonist”

— above: Mr. Kraus and two of his twenty-one New Yorker covers.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The rich around the campfire by Maddie Dai, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

 

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The Asian Babies Exhibition Catalog

The catalog for Pearl River Mart’s exhibit,  “Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists” is available online as a free download here.

Below, two artist pages out of the ten artists showing their work.

 

Amy Hwang On “Asian Babies: Work From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”

Here’s The New Yorker cartoonist Amy Hwang writing about the current Pearl River Mart Gallery exhibit: “Asian Babies: Work From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists”

When I started drawing cartoons for The New Yorker in 2010, I did not think much of the fact that I was possibly the only cartoonist of Asian* descent contributing at the time. It was hard enough to get into the magazine, so I was mainly focused on staying in it by consistently sending in cartoon batches hoping that more would sell. Eventually, I realized I was an anomaly. Being the only Asian New Yorker cartoonist contributing at that time, I felt pressure to keep producing cartoons as if I was an endangered species.

My cartoons are not explicitly “Asian” in topic or style, and without seeing my surname at the bottom corner of my drawings, most people probably wouldn’t think that I am Asian-American at all. I decided from the beginning to sign my cartoons legibly with my full name so that anyone seeing them would surmise that I was both female and Asian, both of which are underrepresented groups among cartoonists. I did this in hopes that there might be some recognition of that fact even if it was subconscious. I also did this so my friends wouldn’t ask me which cartoons were mine. But they still did.

Asian Babies
Jeremy Nguyen, Christine Mi, Amy Hwang, Suerynn Lee, and Joanne Kwong (President of Pearl River Mart) are shown L to R.

Nearly ten years later, there are now several New Yorker cartoonists of Asian descent currently contributing to the magazine. Many, like myself, are based in the United States: Colin Tom, Jeremy Nguyen, Christine Mi, Suerynn Lee, and Evan Lian. Alice Cheng and Hartley Lin are in Canada, and Maddie Dai is a Kiwi living in England. All of them seem young to me. Or rather, I feel old next to them. But I am still caught off guard when any of them will mention my work as if it has been around forever. The passage of time is funny that way. I was well into adulthood when my first cartoon was printed in the magazine, but many of them were practically kids.

Jeremy Nguyen approached me a little over a year ago to curate Asian Babies with him. He had the idea to have a group show featuring New Yorker cartoonists of Asian descent, and the Pearl River Mart Gallery was the perfect venue for our small group. The exhibition developed organically. When we started planning, we had about five cartoonists. In late 2018 and into 2019, four more had their first cartoons printed in The New Yorker, so we added them. There is no way of knowing if we included every cartoonist of Asian descent in the show, but we tried our best by looking at everyone’s surnames which certainly isn’t 100 percent foolproof.

Jeremy Nguyen, Nicolette Leung Renz (granddaughter of Monroe Leung – with her baby), Amy Hwang are shown L to R.

One month before the show was slated to open, Jeremy came across the name Monroe Leung. He was listed with other cartoonists who had had only one cartoon published in The New Yorker. His cartoon was published in 1949. Jeremy was able to contact Monroe’s daughter Corinne Leung Katow with the help of cartoonist Michael Maslin, and we secured permission to include Monroe’s New Yorker cartoon and other works of his in our show. I think people will be as surprised as we were when they discover his works among the others. In my view, he was years ahead of his time.

©Monroe Leung, The Sun

Monroe passed away in 2004, several years before my first cartoon was printed in The New Yorker. And while he may have been the only New Yorker cartoonist of Asian descent in his lifetime, I take comfort in knowing he is no longer alone today.

*Asian in this article refers to East Asian and Southeast Asian

— By Amy Hwang

Asian Babies: Works from Asian New Yorker Artists
Pearl River Mart Gallery
395 Broadway, NYC
Open every day, 10 a.m. to 7:20 p.m. Free and open to the public.

Note: this piece originally appeared on a commercial site. It appears here through the kind permission of Ms. Hwang.

 

More Stevenson Lost And Found Info; Future Addams Family; New Yorker Cartoonists Children’s Books Of Note: Paul Noth, Mike Twohy; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

More Stevenson Lost And Found Info

Here’s further information on the upcoming documentary, Stevenson Lost And Found. “Stevenson” is James Stevenson, one of The New Yorker‘s most prolific cartoonists.

From the Producers of Stevenson Lost And Found:

We are excited to announce the world premiere of Stevenson Lost And Found as part of the DOC NYC Film Festival 2019.

Tickets can be purchased here.

Screening Times:

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 5:25 PM / Cinepolis Chelsea

Mon Nov 11, 2019, 10:40 AM / IFC Center

Link here to the Stevenson Lost And Found website.

Link here to Stevenson Lost And Found on Instagram.

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Future Addams Family

The brand new Addams Family film is doing very very well at the box office …..which means there will be another.

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New Yorker Cartoonists Children’s Books of Note: Paul Noth, Mike Twohy

Out now is Paul Noth’s latest, How To Win The Science Fair When You’re Dead (Bloomsbury Children’s Books). Mr. Noth has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2004.

From the publisher: New Yorker cartoonist Paul Noth continues his laugh-out-loud, illustrated middle grade series about a boy, his wacky family, and an out-of-this-world adventure.

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Coming out in May of 2020 from Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books is Mike Twohy’s Spacebot. Mr. Twohy has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1980.

Here’s some text from Simon & Schuster:

Mike Twohy is a Geisel Honor Award–winning author and illustrator of several books for children, including Poindexter Makes a FriendOutfoxed about which The Horn Book said, “story time audiences will howl with laughter,” Wake Up, Rupert!, and Mouse and Hippo, which the School Library Journal called “a story time hit.”  He has been a longtime contributor of cartoons to The New Yorker. He lives with his wife, cats, and yellow Lab in Berkeley, California.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The “perfect” Dear Santa letter…by Joe Dator, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2006.  Visit his website here.

 

 

 

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Trailer Of Interest: Stevenson Lost And Found; Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell & Peanuts; More Dana Fradon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Trailer Of Interest…Stevenson: Lost And Found

Here’s the official trailer for the highly anticipated documentary film on the late great New Yorker artist & writer, James Stevenson: Sally Williams Stevenson: Lost and Found.  Link here to the official trailer.

From the film’s Facebook page:

Writer and artist, James Stevenson was one of The New Yorker Magazine’s most prolific cartoonists. Revered for its weighty commentary on world affairs, The New Yorker found its sweet side in the wit, whimsy and sheer joie de vivre of Jim’s illustrations and articles. Opening as the artist celebrates his 85th birthday, STEVENSON LOST & FOUND is a bitter-sweet romp through the stellar, 67-year career of a remarkable artist. An odyssey of discovery and loss the film unearths a truly dazzling volume of work, while facing, head-on, the dark and tragic struggles of the artist and those who loved him.
And here’s The Spill‘s A-Z entry for Mr. Stevenson:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 –. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell & Peanuts

Here’s an excerpt on Longreads  from The Peanuts Papers (out October 22nd from Viking) featuring Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell’s contribution. Ms. Campbell has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Link here to her website.

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More Dana Fradon

From David Pomerantz’s Facebook post, October 14th (re-posted here with Mr. Pomerantz’s permission):

R.I.P. Arthur Dana Fradon.
This one especially hurts as I got to know Arthur a bit, spoke at length with him on the phone (he was sharp, funny and had some terrific stories), had many online exchanges with him (it was a big day if I could make him laugh with one of my little jests), and I hoped that I could make the trip to visit him in Woodstock or Connecticut with a few cartoonist friends. He was the very last contract artist that Harold Ross signed to The New Yorker, a few years after Arthur sold his first cartoon to the magazine in 1948. He was one of the most prolific of artists, selling about 1400 drawings over six decades until he finally retired to work on a novel. (He had some, uh, opinions about new Editor Tina Brown.) He was also a terrific satirical writer, the caption perfectly complementing his drawing. This was in a time (late 40s-mid-60s) when many of the contract cartoonists like Arno, Addams and Darrow, Jr. still worked with other writers’ captions, which eventually faded out when Lee Lorenz succeeded Jim Geraghty as Art Editor in 1973.

Arthur played baseball into his eighties and told Peter Arno biographer Michael Maslin, “I’m not really a cartoonist. I’m a misplaced baseball player or something like that.” I loved his work from when I first saw it in one of The New Yorker collections (he was quite proud of the fact that he had the most cartoons in one of the magazine’s retrospective books); when I mentioned to him how much I liked his “Good morning, beheaded” cartoon, he said that seemed to be the most popular of his cartoon prints sold by the magazine. Condolences to Ramona Fradon and their daughter Amy.

— Cartoon above by Dana Fradon, from The New Yorker issue of June 3, 1991

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Here a subpoena, there a subpoena, everywhere a subpoena —  by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

New York Times Dana Fradon Obit; New Books!; New Yorker Cover Artist Roxie Munro Remembers Dana Fradon; Edward Koren On Dana Fradon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts…By Jenny Kroik

The New York Times Dana Fradon Obit

Here’s Richard Sandomir’s New York Times obit for Dana Fradon, who passed away last week at the age of 97.

Shown above, left to right: New Yorker artist Charles Saxon, New Yorker art editor (from 1939 – 1973) James Geraghty, New Yorker artist Dana Fradon, and New Yorker artist,Whitney Darrow, Jr.

–photo: Sarah Geraghty Herndon

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Here are three books of note out soon (one’s out today).

 

 

Emily Flake’s That Was Awkward: The Art and Etiquette of the Awkward Hug (Viking) is out this very day. Ms. Flake has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2008.  Link here to her website.

 

 

Next week (Tuesday, October 25th)  Everyone’s A Critic  (Princeton Architectural Press) a cartoon anthology that includes contributions by 35 New Yorker cartoonists.  The book is the second in a series edited by Bob Eckstein who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007.

 

 

On November 5th , Peter Kuper’s Heart Of Darkness is out from W.W. Norton & Co.. Link here to Mr. Kuper’s website. He has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2011.

 

 

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New Yorker Cover Artist Roxie Munro Remembers Dana Fradon

Roxie Munro, who began contributing covers to The New Yorker with the issue of November 9, 1981  has posted the following piece on Facebook about her late colleague and friend, The New Yorker artist Dana Fradon.

My comments on dear friend Dana Fradon’s passing:

Very very sad about Dana. He was a great friend. A wonderfully talented artist and cartoonist. Satirical, ironic, and very quick – at Tuesday lunches after New Yorker submissions, anything in the service of a witty line, even if it meant sharp jabs at friends. All of which were forgiven in awe of the smart retort. Probably the first very very politically liberal person I met. Super original cartoons on many subjects, including political Washington. We shared house rentals a couple times w/fellow New Yorker artists on Cape Cod; spent weeks traveling in the UK, Paris, and the Dordogne (with some great adventures); hung out on weekends in his classic farmhouse in Newtown, CT (he made a great stew with all sorts of meats, and a really good scallop fettuccine); and part of a summer in Lake Como, Italy, at an artist’s workshop. He did two VERY cool children’s books on medieval knights with my publisher. Dana was an original. He was from a rough and tumble area of Chicago, and served in WW II. His like will not be seen again.

Lots of the guys had quirky “issues” with each other. But they all were brothers, in the difficult business of selling cartoons. And, interestingly, they were NOT male chauvinist pigs, at least not to me. They were respectful of women artists, and supportive, and treated us as equals, though we weren’t; that generation of cartoonists were unique artists and very well-read, smart (mostly) men – Ed Fisher, Donald Reilly, Lee Lorenz, Booth, Addams, Hamilton, Chuck Saxon, Modell, Weber, Richter, Meyer, Ross, Tobey, Henry Martin, Dedini, Drucker, Miller, Farris, Mirachi, Frascino (and later, Levin, Gross, Ziegler, Stevens, Cline, Steiner, Koren, and others). What a group of wonderful talented characters!

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Edward Koren On Dana Fradon

From newyorker.com, The Timeless Cartoons Of Dana Fradon, by long-time contributor, Edward Koren.

 

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Kuper does the honors. (See above for more on Mr. Kuper).

 

Today’s Daily Shouts

“The N.Y.C. Bridal Struggle” but cover artist, Jenny Kroik.