Henry Martin’s New York Times Obit; Personal History: Cartoonist Correspondence; Article Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Gayle Kabaker; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Henry Martin’s New York Times Obit

From The New York Times, July 7, 2020, “Henry Martin, Wry New Yorker Cartoonist, Dead at 94″

Here’s Richard Sandomir’s obit for the wonderful Henry Martin, who passed away a week ago today, just two weeks shy of his 95th birthday.

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Personal History: Cartoonist Correspondence

One of the many pleasures of being a New Yorker cartoonist has been, and continues to be communicating with so many other cartoonists, both new and veteran. I opened my binder of cartoonist correspondence this afternoon to remind myself of the content of the half-dozen letters I exchanged with Henry Martin. One, dated March 10, 2000, was in response to a letter I had written him asking about his Spot work for the magazine (you’ll see a link in The N.Y. Times obit for more on his Spots). Here’s how he replied:

“…almost no one is [interested in Spots] but I loved them and they helped me get my foot in the door at The New Yorker. Most of them were done on scratch board — not much in use anymore — and nearly all were done exact size.

I did that so that I knew just how they would look in the magazine and didn’t have to worry about how they would look enlarged or reduced. In many ways they were more fun to do than cartoons, but of course, they didn’t pay as well and had no reprint value except for The New Yorker…at some point around 1965 I quit doing spots, thinking I’d return to them later. When I did, sometime after Lee took over [Lee Lorenz, The New Yorker‘s art editor, who succeeded James Geraghty in 1973] I found my eyes could no longer adjust to the small size, and I was having trouble finding good scratch board. The best I found was made in Austria and the manufacturer went out of business!…There were many great artists doing Spots…I thought they added so much to the magazine.” 

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Article Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist, Gayle Kabaker

From The Washington Post, July 6, 2020, “Sketching My Way Through Crisis”

–this second piece in a series by Ms. Kabaker.

Visit her website here.

Left: Ms. Kabaker’s January 30, 2017 New Yorker cover

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Amy Kurzweil on no more funding for the arts.

Ms. Kurzweil began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

Visit her website here.

A Bonus Daily From John Cuneo; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

A Bonus Daily Cartoon From John Cuneo.

A second wave drawing from one of the magazine’s best cover artists. See it here.

Mr. Cuneo’s first New Yorker drawing was published in May of 2019, but he’s been contributing covers for close to a decade.

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: Patrick McKelvie on forever dishes. 

Mr. McKelvie’s first New Yorker drawing appears in this week’s issue.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: J.A.K. on fireworks. Mr. K began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

The Monday Spill: The New Yorker Cartoonists Glossary (Updated)

No Monday Tilley Watch today as we’re in the second half of a double issue stretch (the latest issue is dated July 6 & 13, 2020). The next new issue, dated July 20, 2020 will be out next Monday).

Just for fun, I thought I’d dust-off and update the Glossary I compiled some years back for a newyorker.com feature. The original version appears there, but here’s a slightly expanded version reflecting changes at the magazine’s Cartoon Department. Even though the magazine’s employees are working from home during this time, it’s temporary, and so I’ve left in the areas referring to the cartoonists going into the magazine. They will return!

The Glossary 

If the average person happened to sit down with a group of New Yorker cartoonists, they would likely hear some common words and expressions used in unfamiliar and possibly confusing ways. Here is a glossary of commonly used words and expressions by the magazine’s cartoonists:

Batch: As in “I faxed my batch early.” Or “My batch is thin this week.” A batch is the collective term for the drawings a cartoonist submits weekly to the magazine [see Magazine, the].

Cartoon: Drawing

Colin: Colin Stokes, the assistant cartoon editor. Usage: “I’m not sure if there’s a meeting this week—I’d better give Colin a call.”

Daily: Refers to a drawing used online as a Daily cartoon, or to the online feature itself, as in “Did you see today’s Daily?” or, “Who did today’s Daily?” A Daily cartoon does not appear in the print magazine; print magazine cartoons do not appear as Daily cartoons. Go here for a fuller explanation.

David: David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker. His is the final word on whether art is bought. [see O.K. and/or Meeting, the]

Drawing: Cartoon.

Emma: As in “I spoke to Emma about it.” Or “I’ll run it by Emma” or “Emma held [see Held] twelve this week.” Emma is Emma Allen, The New Yorker’s cartoon editor.

Finish: As in “I’ll get that finish to you by the next week.” Finish is short for “finished drawing.” It refers to an O.K.ed drawing that has been readied by the cartoonist for publication.

Held: The drawings Emma holds on to from your batch. A held drawing has the potential of being O.K.ed, although it could still be rejected.

I’m going in : As in “I’m going in next week.” If you’re going in, you’re going in to the magazine to see Emma and show her your batch.

I’m in: As in “I’m in this week.” Or “I’m not in this week.” Refers specifically to one of your drawings being published in the current issue of the magazine.

I went in: As in “I went in last week.” “Went in” refers to going to The New Yorker’s offices, specifically to the art department.

Magazine, the: The New Yorker. As in “I haven’t seen this week’s issue of the magazine—am I in it?”

Meeting, the: The weekly art meeting, at which David Remnick and Emma look over, discuss, and decide which drawings will be bought. David, as the magazine’s editor-in-chief, has the final say on whether a drawing is O.K.ed or rejected.

O.K.: As in “you got an O.K. this week” or “I got an O.K. this week” or “I haven’t had an O.K. in seven months.” This is the two-letter word that every cartoonist lives for—it means that The New Yorker has bought a drawing [see Drawing] from you ( i.e., O.K.ed a sale).

Pitch/Pitching: see Submit/Submitting: “pitch” or “pitching” has begun to take the place of “submit” or “submitting”; I prefer (and argue for retaining) submit to pitch, as pitch seems like a Hollywoodism. It conjures up the artist sitting before a few people and verbally trying to sell an idea. Cartoonists traditionally let the work speak for itself.

Resub: As in “I sent in mostly resubs this week.” Resub is short for “resubmitted.” Cartoonists sometimes send rejected drawings back to Emma for another shot.

Submit/Submitting: What you do when you send in your batch, or bring it in for Emma to see. As in “Yeah, I submitted this week — did you?”

The Weekend Spill: A 1934 July 4th Moment By Steig; Bliss’s American Bystander Cover; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th-July 3rd, 2020; More Spills: Eckstein’s Beast Piece, A Hoff Mural, and More Henry Martin

William Steig’s 1934 New Yorker cover celebrating the 4th of July  seems to capture the mood of this particular 4th when we have been urged to stay at home, away from gatherings. It was, of course, published during another deeply troubled time in our history.

Here’s William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

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American Bystander‘s Michael Gerber has released the cover of his next issue (#15 for those keeping track). Cover by Harry Bliss. You can order your copy here. If this issue is anything like the previous 14 it’ll be worth the five bucks (Cheap!).

 Harry Bliss began contributing cartoons and covers to The New Yorker  in January of 1998.  A Wealth Of Pigeon: A Cartoon Collection (a collaboration with Steve Martin) will be out this November.

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of June 29th – July 3rd, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Madeline Horwath, Peter Kuper, Julia Suits, Sara Lautman, Akeem Roberts.

Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above, and so much more, go here.

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Bob Eckstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007, has begun writing for The Daily Beast. See his first post here.

…Prompted by a post in the Facebook Vintage Panel And Gag Cartoon Group about a Syd Hoff mural, I checked out this piece from The Orange County Register from July 6, 2007.

…More Henry Martin: it’s so great that Henry Martin is listed on this plaque at the old (but not the oldest!) New Yorker offices at 25 West 43rd Street.

 

Must See! An Exhibit Of Liza Donnelly’s Work At The Norman Rockwell Museum

 

Above: the original drawing of a Donnelly cartoon in the The New Yorker issue of April 20, 2020

Liza Donnelly, whose first New Yorker cartoon appeared in the magazine in 1982, will have her first-ever solo exhibit this month at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. There’ll be a virtual opening, via the museum’s Youtube channel on Friday the 10th at 5:30 when Ms. Donnelly will give viewers a live tour of her work and answer questions. The museum will open to the public on Sunday, July 12th. Visit the museum’s website here for more information and an overview of the Donnelly exhibit.

Here’s Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Liza Donnelly (pictured above) Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: June 21, 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited: Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Co-authored with Michael Maslin: Husbands & Wives ( Ballantine 1995), Call Me When You Reach Nirvana ( Andrew & McMeel, 1995), Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com