Tom Toro’s Mystery Rea Irvin Drawing; More Spills with Pat Byrnes, Bob Mankoff, BEK, Gilded-Age Cartoonists & More

Every so often, someone runs into a cartoon mystery.  This time it’s New Yorker cartoonist, Tom Toro.  Here’s Tom to explain:

 

Calling all cartoon sleuths! There’s a mystery afoot.  I managed to get my sticky paws on an original Rea Irvin drawing but I can’t figure out where it was published or what the caption is.

 

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Does anybody out there know?  It didn’t appear in The New Yorker – if their Complete Cartoons archive is indeed complete.  The only other clues to go on are these stamps that appear on the back of the drawing:

 

Richard McCallister stamp

 

As a reward for the correct answer I’ll offer a signed finish of my own.  Thanks for your help, Ink Spillers!

 

If you can solve Tom’s mystery please use the contact button on this site. I’ll forward your message to Tom.

 

 

 

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More Spills Icon Edited

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Byrnes will be in conversation with Bob Mankoff in Chicago, November 7th. Details here….

BEK (Bruce Eric Kaplan) is interviewed on a New Jersey television station.  See it here

In Palm Beach, Florida, an exhibit of some cartoonist forefathers (no foremothers  as far as I can tell from the post).  Details here

Jane Mattimoe has a new Case For Pencils post up with a cartooning duo, Dan Abromowitz & Eli Dreyfus See it here.

 

 

 

 

 

One comment

  1. It may have been waiting for a caption. From http://www.tcj.com/lee-lorenz-cartoonist-editor-writer-jazzbo/2/

    “LORENZ: I recently acquired an early original of mine, a rough, that somebody was selling on eBay. It turned out that this guy’s father had bought a house in Connecticut that used to belong to Richard McAllister, the New Yorker‘s premier gag writer. He wrote ideas for cartoonists like Helen Hokinson and would occasionally do a drawing for the magazine. He sold more gags than anybody. And when they were phasing out gag writers, McAllister asked artists to send him old roughs. He would come up with new ideas, try to sell them, and you would split the profits. So he’d acquired drawings from everybody – boxes of them. And when the house was sold, the guy found all these roughs in the basement and started selling them on eBay! I bought one for $7.”

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