Bob Eckstein’s “Why Bookstores Matter” in Publishers Weekly; A 1970 Whitney Darrow, Jr. Interview

bob-eckstein-pwFrom Publisher’s Weekly, September 23, 2016, “Why Bookstores Matter”Bob Eckstein talks about some of the stores left out of his forthcoming book.

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whitney-darrow-cartoonist-profilesMike Lynch has posted Jud Hurd’s 1970 Cartoonists Profiles interview with the great Whitney Darrow, Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His Ink Spill New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z entry:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. (photo above)  Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. NYer work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories Ink Spill Podcast

gil-roth-in-our-kitchen-sept-2016From the Department of Self-Promotion:

Gil Roth (shown standing in our kitchen last week) has an awful lot of cartoonists on his podcast,Virtual Memories. He visited recently to tape two more (with Liza Donnelly and myself).  The interview with Ms. Donnelly will show up a few Tuesdays from now, but in the meantime you can hear Gil grill me here.

NYC Subway Car of Interest: Mark Alan Stamaty’s Illustrated Shuttle; More Spills… Harry Bliss in a Salinger Home… the new Swann Catalog with Original Art by 18 New Yorker Artists

timessquare-grandcentralshuttlemarkstamatyRead all about Mark Alan Stamaty’s NYC illustrated subway car on Mike Lynch‘s blog here.

 

Mr. Stamaty’s New Yorker debut was with this cover in November of 1992. Here’s a link to his website.

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Bliss

From newyorker.com, September 8, 2016,  “Salinger’s House, Artists Retreat” — the New Yorker‘s Sarah Larson visits Harry Bliss in a Salinger home, now owned by the cartoonist.

 

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swann-cat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new Swann catalog is now available online.  Anyone interested in original New Yorker art will absolutely love looking through.  New Yorker artists represented (both cartoonists and cover artists) are Charles Addams, Frank Modell, Ed Fisher, Tom Toro, William Steig, James Stevenson, Mischa Richter, Barbara Shermund,  Ilonka Karasz,   Laura Jean Allen, Beatrice Szanton, John Jonik, Peter Arno, Ludwig Bemelmans, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Richard Decker, Arthur Getz, and Leonard Weisgard.

A Reminder: There’s A Mary Petty Exhibit Happening in Pensacola

MPI was reminded today while reading an article that there is right this very moment an exhibit of Mary Petty’s work at the Pensacola Museum of Art. Here’s a link.

Shown here is my favorite cover of hers (I’ve no idea if it’s in the exhibit), and one of my favorite New Yorker covers of all-time (let’s say it’s in the top 100).

In that issue of August 4, 1945 are two cartoons by Ms. Petty’s husband, Alan Dunn as well as two by the great Helen Hokinson. Also in the issue are drawings by: Steinberg, Robert Day (a full page!), Whitney Darrow, Jr., Otto Soglow, Julian de Misky (a sequential drawing running over the gutter and onto the following page), Eric Ericson, Sam Cobean, Charles Addams, Garrett Price, Perry Barlow, and Chon Day. For anyone interested in why this era was called the golden age of New Yorker cartooning, seek out and enjoy the artistry of these contributors. (it’s available to New Yorker subscribers online; it’s also available on  the Complete New Yorker, and any library still holding bound New Yorkers).   

 

New Jersey’s New Yorkers…an Ink Spill Map

Here’s a look at Garden State born New Yorker contributors (including its current editor) as well as New Yorker contributors (all cartoonists) not Jersey born, but currently living there. Also included: New Yorker contributors who, though not native-born,  grew up there and/or lived there for a good while. If anyone out there has others I’ve missed (and I’m sure I have) please contact me. (click on the map to enlarge).

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