Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 18: (More) Whitney Darrow, Jr.; Chast in Chicago

Here are more ads by the great Whitney Darrow, Jr.  These ads, and all in this series, excepting the Absolut Vodka campaign ads, are courtesy of SPX’s Executive Director, Warren Bernard.

A reminder: the 2017 SPX begins in three days! Check out their website here.

One of Mr. Darrow’s graphic trademarks is action — his drawings almost always look like they’re in motion.  A lot of energy there no matter the situation (or product).  Dates of ads: Post Toasties, 1955; Chase & Sanborn, 1956; Windex, 1956; Murine, 1960s; Minute Tapioca, 1951.

Mr. Darrow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. (photo above) Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, New Jersey. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

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Chast in Chicago

Ms. Chast will most certainly do a number of appearances promoting her upcoming   book, Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York.  Here’s one coming up…in Chicago.

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 13: The Rambler Campaign

Continuing on with the Spill’s series of advertising work by New Yorker Cartoonists (research and scans courtesy of Warren Bernard of SPX) is this great campaign by Rambler from the late 1950s.  Some of the best of the best in the New Yorker’s stable were involved: William Steig, George Price, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Barney Tobey, Chon Day, and Otto Soglow (The Tobey & Price ads are from 1959, the others from 1958).

Here are the Spill’s A-Z entries for the above artists:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey.  New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Key collection: The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective. New York: Beaufort, 1988.

Chon Day (self portrait above from Collier’s Collects Its Wits) Born April 6, 1907, Chatham , NJ. Died January 1, 2000, Rhode Island. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1998. Key Collection: I Could Be Dreaming (Robert M. McBride & Co., 1945)

Whitney Darrow, Jr. (photo above) Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943). All of Mr. Darrow’s cartoon collections are excellent. Here’s a favorite: “Stop, Miss!” New York: Random House, 1957.

Barney Tobey (photo above from Think Small, a book of humor produced by Volkswagon) Born in New York City, July, 18, 1906, died March 27, 1989, New York. NYer work: 1929 -1986. Key collection: B. Tobey of The New Yorker (Dodd Mead & Co., 1983)

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. NYer work: 1925 -1974.Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

 

 

 

Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein; Christopher Weyant Now Weekly in The Boston Globe; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 6: Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

 

 

 

 

A fun travel-related interview with  New Yorker cartoonist, and World’s Leading Snowman Expert, Bob Eckstein.  His latest book is the NYTs Bestseller, Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores

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Christopher Weyant Now Weekly in The Boston Globe

Congratulations to Chistopher Weyant who now has a weekly editorial cartoon in The Boston Globe.

See his first one here.

 

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 6: Whitney Darrow, Jr. 

Judging by Warren Bernard’s collection of advertising work by New Yorker artists, Whitney Darrow was enormously  popular on Madison Avenue.  Mr. Darrow was one of the magazine’s anchor cartoonists, his work appearing over 1400 times in forty-nine years. I’ve always loved Mr. Darrow’s energetic style — his lines often seem to be in motion.

The dates for the ads: Simoniz, 1959; Consolidated Enamel Printing Papers, 1957; Chase & Sanborn, 1956; Ford, 1953

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Mr. Darrow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. (photo above) Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Bob Eckstein’s “Why Bookstores Matter” in Publishers Weekly; A 1970 Whitney Darrow, Jr. Interview

bob-eckstein-pwFrom Publisher’s Weekly, September 23, 2016, “Why Bookstores Matter”Bob Eckstein talks about some of the stores left out of his forthcoming book.

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whitney-darrow-cartoonist-profilesMike Lynch has posted Jud Hurd’s 1970 Cartoonists Profiles interview with the great Whitney Darrow, Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His Ink Spill New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z entry:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. (photo above)  Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. NYer work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories Ink Spill Podcast

gil-roth-in-our-kitchen-sept-2016From the Department of Self-Promotion:

Gil Roth (shown standing in our kitchen last week) has an awful lot of cartoonists on his podcast,Virtual Memories. He visited recently to tape two more (with Liza Donnelly and myself).  The interview with Ms. Donnelly will show up a few Tuesdays from now, but in the meantime you can hear Gil grill me here.