Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 12: Gluyas Williams

According to Genius in Disguise , Thomas Kunkel’s must-read biography of The New Yorker’s founder and first editor, Harold Ross, Gluyas Williams “was the artistic equivalent of E.B. White, in that to Ross (and to thousands of fans) he simply could do no wrong.”

In that same book (pp. 333-335) there’s a fun section about Ross’s “secret” project: running Mr. William’s Wedding series (16 drawings) all at once in the magazine. It appeared in the issue of June 5, 1948.

Note: All of the scans (except for the Absolut Vodka campaign)  in this on-going series of ads by New Yorker cartoonists are courtesy of SPX’s Executive Director, Warren Bernard.  

 

 

 

 

 

Dates of ads: Log Cabin Syrup, 1934; GE, 1941; Texaco, 1942; McCreery & Co., 1926; Bristol Brass, 1945. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Williams’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Gluyas Williams (photo above) Born, San Francisco, 1888. Died, Boston, Mass., 1982. One of the pillars of Harold Ross’s stable of artists, and one of Ross’s favorite cartoonists. His beautiful full page drawings were a regular feature in the magazine. Mr. Williams illustrated a number of Robert Benchley’s collections, providing the cover art as well as illustrations. NYer work: March 13, 1926 – Aug 25, 1951. Key collections: The Gluyas Williams Book ( Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1929), The Gluyas Williams Gallery (Harper, 1956). Website: http://www.gluyaswilliams.com/

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 10: Otto Soglow

Deep in the dog days of summer seems a good time to pick up the Spill’s series of advertising work by New Yorker cartoonists. Credit and thanks goes out to the Executive Director of SPX, Warren Bernard for allowing his efforts to be shown here.  In Part 10 we see a selection by Otto “The Little King” Soglow, who contributed to The New Yorker for 49 years (1925- 1974). 

His work is still seen in today’s New Yorker, with his “spot” drawings appearing in The Talk of The Town along with Tom Bachtell’s work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dates for ads: Pabst Blue Ribbon, 1941; USS, 1967; Nabisco, 1950s; Pepsi, 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Otto Soglow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974. Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

P. G. Garetto Added to the Spill’s One Club; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 9: Mary Gibson; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Talkin’ Bout Art Young

I have Joe Dator’s latest New Yorker cartoon to thank for my coming upon the cartoon shown by P. G. Garetto. Found in the issue of September 3, 1938, this was the first and last time (Ms. or Mr.) Garetto’s work appeared in the New Yorker, thus an immediate qualifier for the Spill’s One Club. The club is limited to cartoonists who have contributed just one drawing to the magazine in their career.  Every member is identified on the Spill’s A-Z by the red top-hatted  fellow you see below. 

But back to Mr. Dator.  After seeing his drawing I wanted to know how many other zebra drawings had appeared in The New Yorker (less than two dozen). I was looking through the magazine’s database when P.G. Garetto’s name showed up.  I knew I’d never seen it before. A further New Yorker database search turned up no other contributions from this artist.  So welcome to the One Club, P.G. Garetto!

I’ve shown some of the text surrounding the cartoon because of the unusual placement of the two dots just above the drawing.  These two dots have been appearing below the magazine’s cartoons every now and then since the magazine began. I’ve never seen them appear above a cartoon,  until now.  Brendan Gill, in his book Here At The New Yorker, wrote about the dots:

“…unless I have been deliberately kept in ignorance of their true meaning throughout all these years, the dots (which can indeed be found under some of our drawings) are, like so many other things in the magazine, vestiges of notions of design that originated in the twenties and that have survived…”

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 9: Mary Gibson

Mary Gibson had a brief run in the New Yorker, with eight drawings published in  seven years.

In Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies, a history of women cartoonists in the New Yorker, she says of Ms. Gibson’s work: “She…began by drawing cartoons about women in the military, which included subjects ranging from the stocking shortage to WACs needing a hairdresser…after the war was over, Gibson’s cartoons looked more like Hokinson imitations and were concerned with insecure, middle-aged women.” 

Dates for these ads: 1950 for the upper row; 1951 for the bottom row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Gibson’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Mary Gibson (self portrait from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) New Yorker work: eight drawings, June 26, 1943 – April 29, 1950.

Note: My thanks to Warren Bernard, the Executive Director of SPX, for allowing Ink Spill access to his collection of advertisements by New Yorker artists.

 

 

 

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

Max and Simon, The Cartoon Companion’s anonymous duo, are back with a look at all the cartoons in the current double issue.  Among the drawings rated and inspected:  a case of leg-cast mistaken identity, concerned neighbors, mystery meat on sale, a musical jury, and an artist working, selectively, in 3-D. Read it all here.

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Talkin’ Bout Art Young

From the New Yorker’s Culture Desk, August 2, 2017,  “Art Young: Cartoonist For the Ages” — this piece by Francoise Mouly and Art Spiegelman in conjunction with the August 1st publication of  That We May Not Weep: The Life & Times of Art Young  (Fantagraphics) by Glenn Bray and Frank M. Young. (Mr. Spiegelman  contributes an essay to the book). 

Here’s Art Young’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Art Young (above) Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, New York City at The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. New Yorker work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery

 

 

 

Flake’s “Mama Tried” on IFC’s 2018 Slate of Projects; Books of Interest: Seth, Ben Katchor; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 7: Charles Saxon

Flake’s “Mama Tried” on IFC ‘s 2018 Slate of Projects

From Deadline Hollywood, July 29, 2017, “IFC Sets 2018 Slate…” — in a list of projects following this sentence:

IFC has given episodic script orders to the following projects:

is:

Mama Tried
A show about the seamy underbelly of new motherhood, Mama Triedfollows the struggles (and occasional triumphs) of Liz Callahan who’s finding that she could care less about being a “super-mom”- she just wants to survive. Mama Tried weaves Emily Flake’s darkly funny animation to help bring to life all of motherhood’s graphic, and sometimes gruesome, realness. Written by Emily Wilson (Cougar Town, Superior Donuts) and animated by and based on the graphic novel by Emily Flake, executive produced by Jax Media (Full Frontal, Broad City, Search Party).

Ms. Flake was a recent subject of the Spill’s “Checking In With…” series.  Read it here.

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Books of Interest: Seth, Ben Katchor

Never too early to think about upcoming books.  Both of these are University Press of Mississippi titles. Forging the Past: Seth and the Art of Memory –  (the paperback edition; the hardcover was published in 2016) — this edition comes out in December. Seth has been a New Yorker contributor since 2002. 

Ben Katchor: Conversations due in February of 2018. Mr. Katchor began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.

Link here to Seth’s Wikipedia entry.

Link here to Mr. Katchor’s website.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 7: Charles Saxon

A June 8, 1980 New York Times article, “The New Yorker’s Humor Merchants” lead off with this: Charles Saxon, a cartoonist for The New Yorker for the last 25 years, has a problem. So many companies have been buying his drawings for their ads that last year he was able to do only 15 cartoons for the magazine, half his usual total. “I was just swamped with ad assignments and my New Yorker work suffered,” he said.  “This year, I’m setting aside more time for the magazine which I consider my home home and where I can really express myself.”

It is true that, back then, ads using Saxon drawings seemed to be everywhere.  Here’s the very tip of the iceberg, courtesy of SPX’s Executive Director, Warren Bernard, who spent a  great deal of time and effort collecting ads featuring New Yorker cartoonists (and then allowed Ink Spill to reap the rewards).  Dates for ads: Polaroid, 1969; Chivas Regal,1981; Jacuzzi, 1979; IBM, 1963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Mr. Saxon’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Saxon (self portrait above left from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

Fave Photo of the Day: George Booth at His Desk; The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; BEK Talks about Summertime Television; Ellis Rosen, Emma Allen, and Colin Stokes On a Bench; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 5: Helen Hokinson

Fave Photo of the Day: George Booth

Sarah Booth recently took this photo of her father, the one-and-only George Booth.  My thanks to Sarah for permission to post here.

Below left: a “Booth Dog”

Here’s Mr. Booth’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z :

George Booth (photo above taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion

If you like your New Yorker cartoons rated, there’s only one place to go. The Cartoon Companion boys (their true identities are secret) take a look at this week’s offerings which include colluding ice cubes, a kangaroo with a handy pocket, an emergency room with live music, some tusky elephants, and a gluttonous fish.

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Bruce Eric Kaplan on the New Yorker Radio Hour

Here’s Bruce Eric Kaplan on the magazine’s Radio Hour talking about summertime tv.

 

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Video: Ellis Rosen with Emma Allen and Colin Stokes

One of the Cartoon Department’s newest stablemates, Ellis Rosen,  joins cartoon editor, Emma Allen, and associate cartoon editor, Colin Stokes, for a look at some NYC subway-related cartoons. See it here. Extra reading: an Ellis Rosen article of interest here.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 5: Helen Hokinson

In earlier days at The New Yorker, the cartoonists were rated: AAA, AA, A. Two cartoonists were, on paper, unrated, listed above all the others in their own upper stratosphere:  Peter Arno, and Helen Hokinson. Ms. Hokinson was the magazine’s earliest star.

The Spill is grateful to Warren Bernard for providing his entire collection of ads by New Yorker cartoonists, including the three by Ms. Hokinson shown here.

Dates of ads: Flit, 1935; Ry-Krisp, 1945; Maxwell Coffee, 1949.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)