Spiegelman on Maus & Post-Maus; Cartoonists & Cookbooks

From Kentwired.com, March 7, 2018, “Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Art Spiegelman Discusses Politics and Identity”Maus and more from the celebrated cartoonist who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992.

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Cartoonists & Cookbooks

The Cartoonist Cookbook popped up on an online search yesterday.  Published in 1966 by Hobbs, Dorman & Co., it includes 45 favorite recipes by strip cartoonists. I was only able to find a partial list of contributors.*  Here’s a short post about the book.

 

I’m certain that that’s a Virgil Partch drawing in the first column, five squares down on the front cover. Here’s his Spill A-Z entry:

Virgil Partch ( VIP) (pictured above) Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. NYer work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

Also showing up online was this Charles Addams cookbook that I somehow missed over the past few years (Simon & Schuster, 2005):

The only thing close to either of these in the Spill‘s library is the below desserts cookbook featuring a Peter Arno cover (but, alas, no recipes by Arno, who liked to cook).

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*Thanks to the cartoonist, Eli Stein, we now have the entire list of contributors to the Cartoonist Cook Book.  My thanks to Mr. Stein for forwarding. 

 

Tom Toro on Pencils…and More Spills

tumblr_inline_nwjlrpTXsG1sj0qh6_500A Case For Pencils is visited by Tom Toro this week.  Check it out!

Link here to Mr. Toro’s website.

 

 

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More Spills Icon Edited

 

 

 

 

 

 

…Mike Lynch celebrates the 99th birthday of Virgil Partch aka VIP

 

…Two pieces on The New York Review of Books new New York Review Comics, including titles by Abner Dean and Glen Baxter: TCJ’s coverage here…
and Heidi MacDonald’s coverage on The Beat…

 

…read a new interview with Liana Finck here…

 

 

 

It’s A Gift!

ColliersHere’s a little gem of a cartoon collection I found not long ago.  Colliers had the very good habit of collecting cartoons that appeared in its pages.  It’s A Gift!, published in 1947, includes work by New Yorker contributors John Ruge, Gardner Rea, Virgil Partch aka VIP,  Hank Ketcham, Larry Reynolds, Garrett Price, and Barney Tobey.  The editor, Gurney Williams, tells us in the book’s “Prelude” that each contributing cartoonist has written a little piece informing us what “he’d much rather do than draw funny pictures…”

Link here to Chris Wheeler’s wonderful site to see more Colliers cartoon collections.

 

P.S. Mueller: Snatching Steinberg…and Thurber, Steig, Day, Soglow…

Continuing Ink Spill‘s series of New Yorker cartoonists talking about important cartoon connections in their lives is P.S. Mueller on discovering Steinberg’s work.  Mr. Mueller has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.   “1958 Zorro Meets Steinberg” and photograph courtesy of Mr. Mueller.

 

1958 Zorro Meets Steinberg
In my adult mind I think of Saul Steinberg as an artist who forged his own passport out of hell and playfully went on from there. But his complicated life and tricky dance with identity meant nothing to the six or seven year-old Zorro impersonator who long ago became fascinated with his insanely simple and perfect line drawings.
I became a Steinberg thief immediately upon encountering his drawings in my father’s mile high stack of New Yorkers and proudly remain one to this day. When no one arrested me, I kept at it, snatching a bit of Thurber, a dash of Soglow, a pixilated grin from Steig, a blank look from Chon Day, and so on, until the lot of them came to inhabit me the way swallows inhabit a barn. The ghosts of Virgil Partch and Roger Price haunt this fluttery loft as well, but I digress.
How can it be that a few line drawings glimpsed at such an early age more or less charted an entire career path for a kid in Ohio? Was it something to do with the moment of discovery rather than the discovery itself? Or kismet? Nah, I don’t buy any part of the whole kismet thing. It had to be that Rumanian cipher with the paper bag over his head who tempted me to forge my own papers with stolen ink.
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See some of Steinberg’s work for The New Yorker here.
See P.S. Mueller’s New Yorker work here.
(Left:  P.S. Mueller around the time he first encountered the work of Saul Steinberg)

Looking Ahead to 2013: New Books by Gahan Wilson, Pat Byrnes, VIP, Shannon Wheeler, and more

Too early to look ahead to cartoon books coming out in 2013? Nah!

Looking through Amazon’s listings for next year, the first title I came upon that caught my eye: VIP: The Mad World of Virgil Partch by Jon Baril (July 20, 2013, Fantagraphics).

 

From the publisher:

VIP: The Mad World of Virgil Partch is the first time Partch’s life and career has been treated in full, collecting amazing artwork from the entire range of his inspired career and featuring his own writings. Reprinted from original art, primary-source publications, and collectors’ and family archives, VIP’s place in the world of cartooning and humor can finally be fully appreciated in this beautiful coffee-table volume. 120 pages of full color illustrations and 120 pages of black and white illustrations.

 

In June there’s Captain Dad: The Manly Art of Stay-At-Home Parenting by Pat Byrnes (June 4, 2013, Homegrown).

From the publisher:

Pat Byrnes worked at home and made his own hours. His wife’s job (Illinois Attorney General) was not so flexible. So when the first baby came, he naively volunteered to go where few men have gone before and stay home with the kids. On one condition. He wouldn’t be called Mr. Mom, but . . . Captain Dad.

 

In April, Cartoons of World War II, edited by Tony Husband (April 30, 2013,  Arcturus Publishing Limited)

From the publisher:

This book is a brilliant collection of cartoons from Britain, the United States, Germany, and Russia. It contains the work of all of World War IIs greatest cartoonists, including Bill Mauldin, Fougasse, Emett, David Langdon, and Graham Laidler.

 

On March 5, 2013, from Boom! Studios: I Thought You would Be Funnier Vol.3 by Shannon Wheeler:

From the publisher;

The third cartoon collection from the mind of Eisner Award-winning, Harvey Award-nominated and current New Yorker magazine cartoonist, Shannon Wheeler! It’s the best-of-the-best of what’s left on the cutting room floor from Wheeler’s cartoon submissions to The New Yorker magazine

 

And finally: On February 20th, 2013, from Fantagraphics: Gahan Wilson Sunday Comics

From the publisher:

Gahan Wilson Sunday Comics is Wilson’s assault from within: His little-known syndicated strip that appeared in America’s newspapers between 1974 an 1976. Readers must have been startled to find Wilson’s freaks, geeks, and weirdos nestled among family, funny-animal, and soap opera offerings. (The term “zombie strip” — a strip that has long outlived its original creator — takes on a whole new meaning in Wilson’s hands.) While each strip, at first glance, appears to be a standard, color Sunday strip (albeit without panel borders), each Sunday Comic is a collection of one-panel gag cartoons, delineated in Wilson’s brilliantly controlled wiggly-but-sophisticated pen line.