The Monday Tilley Watch

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

 

 

Expecting something political on the July 31st cover it was a surprise when Javier Mariscal‘s water’s edge pastoral popped up on my screen (I’m looking at the digital version of the magazine; I’ll look at the print version when it arrives. Two different experiences). My first thought: if James Stevenson had worked in stained glass, this might be the result. Here’s an example of what I was thinking (a Stevenson cover from October 1975, and Mr. Mariscal’s on the new issue):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A note before heading into the issue: I have a habit of not looking at the cartoonists listed on the Table of Contents — I look at everything else on the TOC, but want to be completely surprised by the cartoons as I page through. I see on the TOC that Bruce McCall has a Shouts & Murmurs piece — things are already interesting.  On my way to “The Talk of The Town”  I stopped to examine the illustration on page 8 by Henning Wagenbreth. Glad I stopped — enjoyable illustration, and, bonus: the name Henning Wagenbreth is now a new favorite name.

Moving on: a quick look at the Talk masthead —  it’s still the revamped version brought in a few months back. I ask the power(s) that be to reconsider and bring back Coke Classic (i.e., Rea Irvin’s masterpiece masthead  — shown directly below — that led off Talk from January 30, 1926 through May 15, 2017). 

It should be noted (and maybe I did note it once on this site): Tom Bachtell is the contemporary artist behind the drawing appearing on the opening Talk page and many of the others sprinkled through the rest of Talk, but the small spots that look like this:

are by the late great Otto Soglow (fondly remembered by many for his creation,  “The Little King”). Mr. Soglow supplied the Talk spot drawings in earlier times (pre-Lee Lorenz years as Art Editor).   We are lucky his work is still appearing here some forty-two years after his death.

And now, finally to the cartoons: the first is by Sara Lautman, whose first New Yorker drawing appeared in March of last year. If the search function on the digital edition is correct, this is her 6th New Yorker appearance. A few pages later is a David Sipress drawing.  Mr. Sipress’s active line is immediately recognizable, as is the New York City subway setting (the subway has been in the news quite a lot, with the Mayor of NYC taking a well -publicized ride just yesterday). Next is a drawing by Paul Karasik (whose new book, How to Read Nancy was mentioned here last time, so I’m mentioning it again). In Mr. Karasik’s drawing, Grant Wood’s American Gothic farmer returns to the New Yorker.  During Charles Addams’ long run at The New Yorker he had a lot of fun with Mr. Wood’s pitchfork-wielding farmer, as well as at least one of the other folks at the bar in Mr. Karasik’s drawing.

Here’s Addams working with the American Gothic duo– this from The Charles Addams’ Mother Goose.

And here’s a link to another.

And here’s Addams with a roomful of recognizable subjects, including Mona Lisa

But I, uh, digress…so back to the issue at hand. Opposite Mr. Karasik’s barflies is a timely drawing by Liza Donnelly featuring colluding ice cubes. As with Roz Chast’s drawing from the last issue, I like the way this drawing has been placed on the page.  Today’s New York Times carries the headline “‘I Did Not Collude,’ Kushner Plans to Tell Senate Investigators” — hmmm

Several pages later we come to another well-placed/sized drawing — this one’s by Harry Bliss. As noted on yesterday’s Spill, it’s “Shark Week” on The Discovery Channel. It’s also summertime. Mr. Bliss manages to celebrate both, as well as tipping his hat to lifeguards (a New Yorker colleague, John O’Brien, was a longtime lifeguard in Wildwood, New Jersey. I believe he’s the only New Yorker artist with those intersecting credentials). Next is a kangaroo cartoon (also well placed & sized) by Liana Finck (who was mentioned on the Spill yesterday for several reasons…both good). Here we have a drawing that, stylistically (and maybe even thematically) brings to mind a cross between Ed Arno and Arnie Levin, with even a dash of Bill Woodman tossed in to the mix.  In the end, of course, it’s pure Finck.

A Seth Fleishman Newton’s Cradle cocktail drawing follows Ms. Finck’s. Mr. Fleishman, like the aforementioned Ms. Lautman, started at The New Yorker in the early months of last year —  his generous use of black against white made (and make) his work easy to pick out in the crowd. A Roz Chast six-parter follows (Ms. Chast’s first New Yorker appearance was in 1978). I failed to mention last week that Ms. Chast has a new book coming out this Fall: Going Into Town: A Love Letter To New York.

A Paul Noth prison drawing is next (Mr. Noth’s first New Yorker appearance was in 2004)  — Mr. Noth has a book coming out as well — it’s not due until next year, but I’ll mention it here anyway.  Someone should do a collection of New Yorker prison cartoons. Three pages following Mr. Noth’s drawing is the very recognizable work of Drew Dernavich.  If you want to know a little more about how he works, visit Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils post here.  Three more pages brings you to one of the newest kids on the block (first New Yorker appearance: November 14, 2016): Lars Kenseth. In this drawing, Mr. Kenseth meets King Arthur, sort of. For some reason I wanted the caption to have the word “sticky” in it, but “licked” comes close enough.

Two pages on we find a drawing by cat and elephant-lover, Danny Shanahan, who’s been contributing to The New Yorker for 30 years.  No one draws  elephants like Mr. Shanahan (he’s even had a New Yorker elephant cover).   

Another new kid, Ellis Rosen is up next (first New Yorker appearance: December 12, 2016). I like birds-in-flight cartoons. Carl Rose, Lee Lorenz, and a number of other colleagues have offered them up to us over the years.

On the opposite page from Mr. Ellis’s drawing is a drawing executed in the instantly recognizable  style of William Haefeli (first New Yorker appearance: 1998). The Spill’s archive is lucky enough to have one of Mr. Haefeli’s original New Yorker drawings.  Visitors who are shown the piece are usually surprised by its size (it’s quite small) and its complexity (his originals look even more complex in person than on the printed page or screen).

A few pages later, we have what looks like a Smith Bros. cough drop board meeting —  a bunch of bearded men courtesy of Carolita Johnson (first New Yorker appearance: 2003), followed by a cat and dog living room situation by Christopher Weyant (first New Yorker appearance: 1998; Mr. Weyant is the  illustrator of a recent childrens book, I Am (Not) Scared by Anna Kang).  I love the way Mr. Weyant draws cats (he joins the Well-drawn Cat Club; I won’t list all the members for fear of possibly leaving someone out).  Tom Toro’s next (first New Yorker appearance: 2010) with a rarity: a lethal-signage cartoon. Kudos to the author of Tiny Hands. 

Mr. Toro’s drawing is followed by a Liam Walsh cartoon featuring a smallish fish with a big appetite (Mr. Walsh’s first New Yorker appearance: 2011). I already mentioned Bill Woodman above, but I’ll mention him again. I see fishing cartoons and I think Woodman. For some examples check out his book, Fish and Moose News (published in 1980). 

 

Lastly, the newest of the newbies, Maggie Larson, whose first New Yorker drawing appeared in last week’s issue.  I can’t recall how many massage-related cartoons have been in The New Yorker. At least one, now (someone with a better database than mine please let me know of others).

 

And that’s that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuneo’s Klam Drawings; Sikoryak Illustrates Trumpisms; Finck Covers Closet and a Novel

Cuneo’s Klam Drawings

What fun! New Yorker cover artist and illustrator, John Cuneo, has supplied illustrations for Matthew Klam’s latest book, Who Is Rich?: A Novel ;  what’s fun, besides Mr. Cuneo’s work — called “…darkly humorous…” in The Washington Post’s  review of the book — is that the novel’s main character is a…cartoonist.

 

 

 

 

Here’s how the novel is described, in part, by the publisher: 

Every summer, a once-sort-of-famous cartoonist named Rich Fischer leaves his wife and two kids behind to teach a class at a week-long arts conference in a charming New England beachside town. It’s a place where, every year, students—nature poets and driftwood sculptors, widowed seniors, teenagers away from home for the first time—show up to study with an esteemed faculty made up of prizewinning playwrights, actors, and historians; drunkards and perverts; members of the cultural elite; unknown nobodies, midlist somebodies, and legitimate stars—a place where drum circles happen on the beach at midnight, clothing optional.

Above: drawings by John Cuneo from Who Is Rich?    Link here to Mr. Cuneo’s website.

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  • Sikoryak Illustrates Trumpisms

Robert Sikoryak’s The Unquotable Trump  (Drawn& Quarterly) was unveiled at Comic Con Diego.  This is the third Trump-related title from a New Yorker contributor (Tom Toro’s Tiny Hands and Shannon Wheeler’s Sh*t My President Says are the other two).

Read about the CBR’s article on Mr. Sikoryak here.

 

 

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Finck Covers Closet

This interesting piece by Ms. Finck in The New York Review of Books

…and more Finck: this interview from Bedford +Bowery

left: one of Ms. Finck’s drawings from the NYR

 

…lastly, leaving off where this day’s post began, it has been brought to the Spill‘s attention that Ms. Finck is the cover artist behind Matthew Klam’s aforementioned novel.

 

 

 

 

Happy 92nd, Henry Martin!; Tom Toro Talks Trump

Ink Spill wishes the wonderful Henry Martin a very Happy Birthday! He celebrated his 92nd a few days ago.

Mr. Martin’s first New Yorker drawing was published August 15, 1964 —  he went on to contribute nearly 700 more. In his honor here’s a 2014 interview brought to this site’s attention by David Pomerantz. It was conducted by Mr. Martin’s daughter Ann, the author of the enormously popular Baby-Sitter’s Club series.  You can read it here.

Below: a Martin New Yorker drawing from 1989, and his collection from 1977.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Toro Talks Trump

From the Huffington Post, July 18, 2017, “New Yorker Cartoonist Breaks down the Details of His Scathing Trump Takedowns” –Tom Toro, who was the subject of an interview here not long ago, talks Trump to HuffPo. Read it here.

Tom Toro: The Ink Spill Interview

New Yorker cartoonist, Tom Toro and I’ve been emailing now and then over the seven years he’s been contributing cartoons to the magazine, but it wasn’t until a month ago, when he came east from Kansas for Jack Ziegler’s memorial, that we finally met in person and were able to chat for awhile. The idea for an interview had been batted around by us earlier in the year; I like to think it began in earnest right there and then in a restaurant on Manhattan’s upper east side. With Dock Street Press’s release of Tom’s first book, Tiny Hands, a collection of the political work he did for The New Yorker’s Daily Cartoon slot, it seemed like the perfect time to turn our conversation into something more organized. Following the interview I asked Tom to select and comment on five favorites of his own work — you’ll see those at the end of this post.
Read more

An Ink Spill Exclusive: Tom Toro’s 4 Page Playboy Spread; Attempted Bloggery, Past & Present; New Case For Pencils w/ Joana Avillez

An Ink Spill Exclusive: Tom Toro’s 4 Page Playboy Spread

Playboy‘s recently revived cartoon presence features Tom Toro in a big way, namely a four page spread in the July/August issue. Courtesy of Mr. Toro and Playboy, Ink Spill is pleased to show you the feature, “Travels With Toro” in its entirety (click on the work to enlarge): 

 

 

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Attempted Bloggery, Past & Present

Through the magic of Facebook or Twitter (can’t recall, and it’s not that important) I ran across mention of a three year old Attempted Bloggery post on the great artist Alajalov.  So, belatedly, here it is, from June 14, 2014: “Summing Up Constantin Alajalov”

(pictured left: Mr. Alajalov)

…and posted more  recently  this interesting Attempted Bloggery piece about Ray Rohn, a  New Yorker cover artist with one cover to his credit. “Ray Rohn: A Portrait of a Serviceman”

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A New Case For Pencils with Daily Shouts artist, Joana Avillez

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils is up, with this look at Joana Avillez‘s tools of the trade.  Ms. Avillez’s work has been seen on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts as well as in print on Shouts & Murmurs.

See it here!

Resist! #2 Arrives July 4th With An Abundance of New Yorker Contributors

 

The second issue of Resist!, a free “political comics zine of mostly female artists” (a “Man Cave” section is included) edited by Nadja Spiegelman and The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, will be distributed this coming July 4th in comic book stores and out on the streets by volunteers (approximately 60,000 copies of the first Resist! were distributed this past January).

Go here to find out where you can find a copy near you

According to a press release “the free distribution of Resist! is intended as an Independence Day celebration of the First Amendment, of our diverse country and of our resilience.”

The Editors write in the introductory pages of #2: “These pages contain many individual realities.  They reflect topics as diverse as their contributors: the environment, immigration, racism and the economy.”

Artists represented in this 96 page anthology are from all over the world, but as the Spill’s focus is  primarily New Yorker contributors, I’m  listing the artists whose work has been published there.  In order of appearance:  Roz Chast, Kendra Allenby, Carol Lay, Ana Juan, Anita Kunz, Emily Flake, Amy Kurzweil, Kim Warp, Abigail Gray Swartz, Andrea Arroyo, Liniers, John Cuneo, Tom Toro, Peter Kuper,  Frank Viva, Paul Karasik, Art Spiegelman, R. Sikoryak, Dean Rohrer, Shannon Wheeler, and Daniel Clowes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, link here to the Resist! website.

Credits:

Resist! #2 cover by Malika Fravre, a French artist living in London, England.

Across the Great Red States by Kendra Allenby, a cartoonist and storyboard artist living in Brooklyn, NY.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker

“We’re looking for something that says ‘Death to the Patriarchy’…” by Amy Kurzweil, author of Flying Couches: A Graphic Memoir.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker.

All art copyrighted by the respective artists.