Unseen Kovarsky, Pt. 3! More Unpublished Work by the Great New Yorker Artist

Here at Ink Spill, we are celebrating the upcoming must-see exhibit, “Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons from The New Yorker” at The Society of Illustrators.

  This is the third in a series of unpublished artwork by the late great Mr. Kovarsky, who contributed to The New Yorker from 1947 through 1969. My sincerest thanks to the Kovarsky family for sharing these pieces with us. 

Note: all work shown here is copyright the Estate of Anatol Kovarsky

 Today’s post is book-ended by two pieces titled “Season’s Greetings” — the one above (dated 1969) and the black & white drawing appearing at the end of this post. In between, three drawings with subjects Mr. Kovarsky returned to over the years. If you happened to have read the piece on this site few years back about the Spill’s visit with Mr. Kovarsky you might remember that his wife, Lucille, told us that the large studio Kovarsky once used in lower Manhattan was divided in two: one part for doing drawings, the other for paintings. Lucille said, “He would switch from one to the other.”  I can’t help but believe the division blended from time-to-time resulting in the many many drawings he did of an artist at his easel such as the multi-panel piece below from the mid 1950s.  Kovarsky was one of the few New Yorker artists able to produce an abundance of un-captioned work. The Trojan Horse drawing (directly below the artist & model multi-panel) is an excellent example.

 

More Unseen Kovarsky: Unpublished Cartoons and Covers!

Here at the Spill we’re celebrating the upcoming Society of Illustrators exhibit, “Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From The New Yorker” by presenting unpublished cartoons and cover art by the late great artist. Enjoy!

— all work shown here courtesy of the Kovarsky family; all art copyright the Estate of Anatol Kovarsky. 

Below: The Kiss (c.1955-1962)

Below: Caroling on Fire Escape  (a sketch for a series of holiday cards, 1959)

 

Below: Holiday Shopping (cover idea sketch c.1960s)

Mr. Kovarsky’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Anatol Kovarsky (photo above, NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) New Yorker work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

 

Unseen Kovarsky: Unpublished Cartoons and Covers From the Late Great Artist

A special treat!  In celebration of the upcoming exhibit at The Society of Illustrators, Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker,  the Spill is presenting unpublished work by this wonderful artist who contributed cartoons and covers to The New Yorker from 1947 through 1969. Today and next Wednesday, and possibly even a few more Wednesdays after that, I will  post cover sketches and drawings generously provided by Mr. Kovarsky’s family.  My sincerest thanks to them for allowing us to see this beautiful work.

— Note: all the work shown is copyright the Estate of Anatol Kovarsky.

 

— And for those who may have missed it, here’s a link to the Spill piece on Mr. Kovarsky from the summer of 2013, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

 

 

A Rafter of Kovarsky Turkeys; A Favorite Thanksgiving Cartoon Revisited

A Rafter of Kovarsky Turkeys

Thanks to the generosity of Anatol Kovarsky’s family, here are a number of the artist’s unpublished sketches (mostly turkeys, plus a few chickens) as well as an unpublished sketch of his Thanksgiving New Yorker cover of November 24, 1962 ( the finished cover art appears as well). Mr. Kovarsky’s work will be celebrated this coming January in an exhibition at the Society of Illustrators.

 

For more on Mr. Kovarsky, who passed away in 2016, here’s a Spill piece from 2013, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”  (this piece also appeared on the New Yorker‘s website in a slightly edited form).

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A Favorite Thanksgiving Cartoon Revisited

The above drawing by Bob Eckstein appeared in The New Yorker, November 26, 2012. It remains one of my all-time favorite Thanksgiving cartoons.  When it appeared I asked Mr. Eckstein a few questions about it:

Michael Maslin: Bob, your drawing, The First 3-D Thanksgiving, is, I believe, the first 3-D cartoon in the magazine’s history (if anyone out there finds another, please bring it to my attention).  Is it actually 3-D?  If I was wearing 3-D glasses right now, and looking at your drawing, would it be appear three-dimensional?

Bob Eckstein: It works, but not as well as it could, but that is by design.  It is 3-D but we reeled it back.  Knowing the reader wouldn’t have glasses, I went for the most readable degree of 3-Ding the cartoon so it still looked like a cartoon and not this heavy ominous image on the page which would have distracted from the joke.

MM: We should probably give a shout-out to Norman Rockwell, whose famous 1942 Saturday Evening Post “Freedom From Want”  piece is obviously referenced in your drawing.  Did you have Rockwell’s work in front of you when you were working on your finished piece?

BE: I had it in front of me, and underneath me, as I did trace most of the guy in the back and then glanced over to draw the rest of the set-up.  My initial sketch had the whole family shocked at the dancing turkey but it looked too forced and too different from the Rockwell iconic piece.  I realized Rockwell had it right the first time except he forgot the glasses.

 

 

 

George Booth on CBS Sunday Morning; John Held’s 1927 Cover; More Spills: Lars Kenseth, Tom Toro

The one-and-only George Booth, whose life work, as regular visitors to the Spill know, is currently being celebrated at The Society of Illustrators, will be featured in a CBS “Sunday Morning” segment this weekend.  Info here.

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Attempted Bloggery continues to find fun stuff.  Today it’s a John Held, Jr cover for a 1927 Yale- Princeton Football game.

Below is a snippet.  To see it all, go here.

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Lars Kenseth has joined Darlycagle.com.

Tom Toro has announced that his work is now available on Artsugar.

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at the Society of Illustrators; Interview of Interest: Tom Toro; Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden; Brendan Loper’s Town Square; Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at The Society of Illustrators

As visitors to this site know, there’s an exhibit of work by George Booth at The Society of Illustrators. The show is a real treat.  Last night Mr. Booth was on stage in front of a packed house, telling stories and answering questions. Here are some photos, courtesy of Liza Donnelly.

Above, left – right: George Booth; Jeremy Nguyen (hat, green glasses), David Borchart (green sweater); Bob Eckstein (with pen & paper).

Below,  left – right: Seth Fleishman (back to camera), Drew Dernavich, Corey Pandolph; Sam Gross, Maria Scrivan.

Below: the scene at The Society.  On stage: Sarah Booth, George Booth, and J.J. Sedelmaier, who curated the exhibit.

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Interview of Interest: Tom Toro

From Fiction Writers Review, November 7, 2017, “Setting the Tone: An Interview with Tom Toro”

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Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden

___________________________________________________________________________________  Brendan Loper’s Town Square

From the Lititiz Record Express,  November 8, 2017,  “Drawing attention to Lititiz: New Yorker cartoon causes mixed reactions”— this piece on a recent New Yorker “Daily” cartoon by Brendan Loper

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Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Coming in June, 2018 from University Press of Mississippi, Conversations: Peter Kuper (Conversations With Comic Artists Series).

From the publisher:

Along with two dozen images, this volume features ten lively, informative interviews with Kuper. The book also includes a quartet of revealing interviews with underground comix legends R. Crumb and Vaughn Bodé, Mad magazine publisher William Gaines, and Jack Kirby, co-creator of mainstream superheroes from the Avengers to the Fantastic Four. These were conducted by Kuper and fellow artist Seth Tobocman in the early 1970s, when they were teenagers. 

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