Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery; New Yorker State of Mind on the New Yorker’s 1929 Anniversary Issue

Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery continues its E. Simms Campbell fest with a lot more drawings. Go see!


New Yorker State of Mind on the New Yorker’s 1929 Anniversary Issue

Another Ink Spill favorite blog, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker looks at the magazine’s fourth anniversary issue. Much fun!



Spiegelman on Maus & Post-Maus; Cartoonists & Cookbooks

From Kentwired.com, March 7, 2018, “Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Art Spiegelman Discusses Politics and Identity”Maus and more from the celebrated cartoonist who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992.


Cartoonists & Cookbooks

The Cartoonist Cookbook popped up on an online search yesterday.  Published in 1966 by Hobbs, Dorman & Co., it includes 45 favorite recipes by strip cartoonists. I was only able to find a partial list of contributors.*  Here’s a short post about the book.


I’m certain that that’s a Virgil Partch drawing in the first column, five squares down on the front cover. Here’s his Spill A-Z entry:

Virgil Partch ( VIP) (pictured above) Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. NYer work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

Also showing up online was this Charles Addams cookbook that I somehow missed over the past few years (Simon & Schuster, 2005):

The only thing close to either of these in the Spill‘s library is the below desserts cookbook featuring a Peter Arno cover (but, alas, no recipes by Arno, who liked to cook).


*Thanks to the cartoonist, Eli Stein, we now have the entire list of contributors to the Cartoonist Cook Book.  My thanks to Mr. Stein for forwarding. 


Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 32: George Price

It’s more than fair to say no one drew like George Price. His work looks like a cartoon schematic.  And then there are those somewhat mysterious split lines. Looking at one of his original drawings up real close you can see that the splits were created by his drawing over and over (and over) his original pen stroke. He’d build up the line, and sometimes be off enough to create a parallel line. A fascinating style.

 Surprising (to me anyway) that it’s taken til Part 32 of this series to get to Mr. Price as he is a New Yorker cartoon god. He contributed to the magazine for 62 years, becoming one of only 23 members of the K Club (his work was published over a thousand times in The New Yorker). The database shows the exact number to be 1, 279 (including his one cover, above right).   

Here are just some of many ads by Mr. Price, all courtesy (as usual in this series) of SPX’s Warren Bernard.  All Mr. Bernard’s work — the researching, scanning, organizing, sharing — is greatly appreciated.

Below: two Durkee’s ads: on the left from 1955, and the other 1957. Scotch Tape, 1947; Peterman Ant Killer, 1946; American Express, 1954; Del Monte, 1969


Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Price Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991.  To see Mr. Price’s cartoon collections visit the Spill‘s Cartoonists Library.





The Herblock Award Goes to Ward Sutton; Podcast of Interest: Joe Dator on “The Shining”; Liza Donnelly’s Live-Drawings From The Oscars

Ward Sutton Awarded the Herblock Prize

Ward Sutton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007, has been awarded the Herblock Prize.  According to a press release:

The Herblock Prize is awarded annually by The Herb Block Foundation for “distinguished examples of editorial cartooning that exemplify the courageous independent standard set by Herblock.”

For more on Herblock, link here.

To read more about the Herblock Foundation, go here.

To visit Ward Sutton’s website go here.

(above far right: an example of Herblock’s classic take on Richard Nixon)


Joe Dator on The Shining

From The Shining 2:37 Podcast, March 5, 2018, “Episode 20: Hullo Danny with The New Yorker Cartoonist Joe Dator”

Mr. Dator, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006, discusses the twins (shown above) among other things, Shining-ish.

Link here to Mr. Dator’s website.


Liza Donnelly’s 2018 Oscar Drawings

Liza Donnelly, seen in the screen grab above live-drawing from the Red Carpet, has gathered her work from Oscar week on Medium.  This is Ms. Donnelly’s third year live-drawing from the Academy Awards.  See it all here.

Visit Ms. Donnelly’s website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of March 12, 2018

Despite the snow scene outside my window and the forecast for another wallopin’ of snow here in a few days, I know Spring is just around the corner. The latest New Yorker cover — the second by Jenny Kroik — is in the same realm of wishful thinking. Her cover is a welcome respite from politics, which are always just around the corner too. 

Paging through the issue, I noticed a photo under the “Videos” heading at the bottom of the “Contributors” page.  A new online feature: “The New Yorker Interview” — a swell idea.  I’m hoping future interviews will include the magazine’s artists.

Moving quickly now through pet peeves: the use of a near full page photo leading off Goings On About Town; the absence of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk of The Town masthead. 

And now the cartoons: the first of the issue, a Frank Cotham drawing that on my tablet appeared to show a fellow running along a beach (I thought he was running near dune grass).  On the laptop it’s quite clear he’s running in a field.  The runner’s toned legs — a funny touch –are unexpected (in a Cotham drawing) but certainly do indicate this fellow’s been in training. 

Seven pages later, a Carolita Johnson bar drawing. I think this just might be my favorite drawing of hers. The caption is textbook (New Yorker textbook, that is), from the use of the name “Jer” to the mid-caption set-up use of the word “empty” to last word, “peanut.”

Six pages later, another new favorite by a veteran cartoonist.  Drew Dernavich‘s Batman drawing delivers: caption, the drawing itself. Wonderful (I would’ve loved to see the drawing occupy a larger space). Three pages later, Avi Steinberg gives us a turn-about on a favorite pastime for many: people watching. Mr. Steinberg has removed the generally accepted casualness of people-watching and turned it into people-staring.  Awkward.

Three pages later, a moment with an aging couple via Emily Flake. A few pages following Ms. Flake’s drawing, a Roz Chast drawing which made me happily recall cartoonists’ lunches of yore (and even more recently than yore). 

Four pages later, an Olivia de Recat drawing.  As with her two previous drawings, this is text-driven (a Tina Brownism, I think) but not as text-driven as her previous efforts. If Ms. de Recat’s “Big City Sound Machine” was actually being produced I might spring for one if only for the “Dump Truck in Rain” sound — what poetry.

Three pages later a drawing by veteran cartoonist, Mike Twohy.  I associate sack races with town picnics in summertime, but I suppose they’re not exclusive to a season (I played around with a sack race and a seasonal reference many years ago, It appeared in the New Yorker  June 21, 1982, to be exact. See below). I’m also reminded of Robert Day’s 1945 collection, All Out For The Sack Race! I know there’ve been a few other sack race drawings in the magazine but not yet enough to fill up a New Yorker Book of Sack Race Cartoons.

Three pages later a Bob Eckstein game show drawing. Without diving into the piece (that’s what they do over on Cartoon Companion) I really enjoyed the well-situated and funny Tom & Mom contestants.  We used to see game show drawings every so often; it would be great if we got to see more. They are silliness vehicles.

Directly opposite Mr. Eckstein’s drawing (and why it’s directly across is a puzzle — why not in the upper right hand corner?) is a beauty by Edward Koren. A lot to look at in this drawing, as is usually the case with Mr. Koren’s work.

The final drawing in the issue (not counting the Caption Contest drawings) is by Darrin Bell. Criminals on their way to a caper (there’s a word that’s been retired for at least 50 years). Two of the would-be robbers are masked. The driver — who’s quite a large fellow – is unmasked.  This reminded me for some reason of that great scene in The Town, when the guys don rubber nun masks — even the driver. I guess in these situations it’s up to the individual would-be perpetrator to make the masked or unmasked call.













At the Oscars! Liza Donnelly Live-Draws From the Red Carpet; “That Special Kind of Madness”: The Seventh New Yorker Album

At The Oscars! Liza Donnelly Live-Draws From the Red Carpet

 Back for her third trip to the Academy Awards, Liza Donnelly, is live-drawing for CBS News (she’s their Resident Cartoonist). You can follow her work tonight from the Red Carpet on Instagram (lizadonnelly), Twitter (@lizadonnelly), etc., etc.


“That Special Kind of Madness”: The Seventh New Yorker Album

The Seventh New Yorker Album, published in 1935 by Random House, features Peter Arno’s March 23, 1935 New Yorker cover as its cover (the third solo album cover for Arno, with two more to follow).  As I wrote in my Arno biography, this cover was “a quiet link between the old Arno style and what would become the new.”

The front jacket flap copy informs us that this album is a two-fer since there was not a 1934 album, and goes on to say, “Consequently, this edition not only contains more pictures by more artists, but the publishers believe that it marks a new high standard in quality for the series.”

A remarkable album in the series for one reason: it has dueling forewords: The Undertakers Garland (described as “A Dissenting Foreword By Lewis Mumford ” and Fresh Flowers (described as “A Partial Defence By One Of The Editors” ) .

Lewis Mumford, at the time the magazine’s Art Critic, didn’t sugar-coat his take on The New Yorker‘s current cartoons, writing, in part:

“…the jokes seem more interesting than the drawings; or rather, even when the drawings are most adequate, they remain a mere instrument of the idea….The comedy has that special kind of madness that springs out of  a rough day at the office and three rapid Martinis. It is titillating, but a little frothy; it tickles me but remains peripheral; it has flavor but lacks salt.”

Wolcott Gibbs, who wrote the “partial defence” was in his fifth year of acting, in his words, “as a sort of liaison officer between the editorial staff of The New Yorker and the artists who draw its pictures,”  addressed Mr. Mumford’s issues one-by-one and concluded with this “defence” of Mr. Mumford’s “three rapid Martinis” charge:

“This apparently refers to the work of a few artists whose characters belong to no particular land or time and are held to the world only lightly, by the pull of tempered gravity. They are the wilder shadows in the same wonderland that Lewis Carroll first explored, and they are valuable to this collection as lesser examples of the same universal and timeless comedy. It is, of course, important that this sort of humor, operating in its own particular vacuum, be used judiciously…”

And so, here we have, just ten years into the New Yorker‘s existence, a very public debate over what a New Yorker cartoon should be, and should not be.  If there’s a constant in this funny world of the magazine’s cartoons — now closing in on their 100th birthday —  it is that the debate has never ceased.

Here’s the list of the contributing artists in the album. 

Most of the names will be familiar to long-time New Yorker readers, with the possible exception of Eric Monroe Ward,  who is a certified member of Ink Spill’s One Club. The One Club is limited to cartoonists who have been published once and only once in the New Yorker.  This icon   identifies them on the A-Z. 

  Mr. Ward’s only appearance was in the issue of July 14, 1934. As his work likely has little opportunity to shine, I’m showing his one drawing below:

*Note: this very same issue with Mr. Ward’s drawing also contains James Thurber’s classic, “What have you done with Dr. Millmoss?”  — for me personally, a most important cartoon — actually, the most important cartoon.  Nice to run across it again in its natural habitat. 


For more on Lewis Mumford, check out Findings and Keepings: analects for an autobiography (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1975).

And for more on Wolcott Gibbs, there is Thomas Vinciguerra’s wonderful Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber and the Golden Age of The New Yorker (Norton, 2016).