Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini; The Monday Tilley Watch

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini

Out of the blue, the Monterey Herald posted this fine photo of the late Eldon Dedini under the headline, “Looking Back, Portrait of a Cartoonist”

Here’s Mr. Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. New Yorker work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

And a real treat, mentioned here a long time back: there’s a multi-panel documentary of Mr. Dedini available onYouTubePart 1 here

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The Monday Tilley Watch

The issue of May 14, 2018, The “Innovators Issue”…

Record keeping: here’re the cartoonists in the issue (Liana Finck’s name isn’t below but she is listed on the Table of Contents for a Sketchbook piece titled “Life and Work”).

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead (below) is still in storage.  As the president might say: Sad!

And sorry to bring this up again, but this business of switching from the Irvin typeface on bylines (see below: “By Tad Friend”) strikes me as tweaking something that does not need tweaking. In fact, some newly incorporated design elements need to be un-tweaked. Would you tweak the top of the Empire State Building because you could? I hope not.

 

Below is a heading plucked from the Dec. 3, 2012 issue.  Notice Calvin Trillin’s name set in Irvin type. Now look back up at the byline for Superior Intelligence.  No question which is the superior typeface. 

Ok, back to cartoons, briefly.  If you want a close look at each cartoon in the issue please visit the Cartoon Companion.  They usually post their rated takes for the latest issue at the end of the week. The CC and the Spill are not affiliated, and in fact often disagree on what’s a great cartoon and what’s a dud.  I’ll return to looking closely at cartoons in this space every so often. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personal History: Going To The Window

From 1976 through early 1980 (when I moved out of Manhattan) I made a weekly trip via subway  from my apartment on West 11th Street in Greenwich Village to the New Yorker‘s offices on 25 West 43rd Street.  After a week of working mostly alone at home it was my one big foray into the real world.

Stepping from the 42nd Street subway at Bryant Park, I’d jaywalk across 42nd Street to get to the W.R.Grace building. Its north/south block-wide lobby allowed access to 43rd Street, almost directly across the street from 25 West 43rd.

After pushing through the revolving doors at 25 West 43rd Street, and following an elevator ride to the 18th floor, I’d arrive at my destination: a window.  I’d slip a 10″ x 13″ grey envelope of new drawings through the slot at the base of what appeared to be very thick glass. Behind the glass sat a receptionist. She’d take the new envelope and pass me an envelope of my work submitted (and rejected) the week before. Then I’d get back on the elevator to the main lobby, and retrace my steps home. In all of those years I never spoke to the receptionist (nor she to me), nor did I run into anyone in the hallway (I did however share a down elevator ride with Charles Addams. We didn’t speak).

The window reception was one of many of the magazine’s oddities left behind when the magazine moved south across the street in 1991.  

Below: the window.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; More Mischa on Attempted Bloggery

The Daily Cartoons (not 100% Trumpian, but close!) were handled this past week by the following cartoonists: Darrin Bell, Ellis Rosen, Emily Flake, Drew Panckeri, and Brendan Loper. 

And over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Liana Finck, and a team effort by Jason Adam Katzenstein and Sophia Warren.

All of the above work and more can be found here.

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More Mischa on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler continues his Mischa Richter fest on Attempted Bloggery.  Mr. Richter is a member the Spill’s K Club  (the club’s 23 member have sold a thousand or more cartoons to The New Yorker). Mr. Richter’s New Yorker career spanned sixty-one years (I believe the cartoonist record-holder is William Steig at seventy-three years).

Cartoonist Mike Lynch on Dwindling Cartoon Markets; Mischa Richter on Attempted Bloggery; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

From Mike Lynch, May 2, 2018, “Another Market For Gag Cartoons is Going Going Gone”

Reader’s Digest is in the headlights here.

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 Attempted Bloggery on Mischa Richter

Following up his E. Simms Campbell fest, Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery moves on to Mischa Richter. Looking forward to what he has come up with. See today’s Richter post here.

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A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

A New Yorker State of Mind forges ahead with another in-depth look at an issue from ages ago.  Above: The issue, with an Arthur Kronengold cover — one of 22 of his published by the magazine. Here’s the post! 

 

 

Exhibit of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Arthur Getz; Review of Interest: Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s New Book; Follow-Up: John Cuneo’s Spring Cover

From The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon, “The Art of Arthur Getz: City and Country” an exhibit of work by the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists.  Opens May 5th.  

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for bringing this exhibit to my attention. Be sure to check out his site today for an interesting piece on Mischa Richter.

Mr. Getz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z: 

Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913; died, 1996. New Yorker work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published, and one cover). According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

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Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s New Book

From Publishers Weekly, April 30, 2018,  “The Wild Woman of Comix” — Leela Corman’s review of Ms. Kominsky-Crumb’s latest book, out today. 

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Follow-Up: John Cuneo’s Spring Cover

Visitors to this site may remember a recent piece, “Favorite Cover Submission of the Week” — featuring the work of New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo.  Happy & pleased to say the cover (slightly revised) has found a home, shown below right, on Chronogram, a splendid Hudson Valley (NY) publication.