Interview of Interest: Kim Warp; Cartoon Companion Reviews Latest New Yorker Cartoons; PR: Blitt Speaks with Studio 360; Applause Applause: Karasik & Newgarden’s NYTs How To Read Nancy Review; Opp Art Launch, Kuper’s World War 3 Illustrated Release Party, Arroyo’s Unnatural Election

Interview of Interest: Kim Warp

From The Q&A with APC,  November 28, 2017: “Episode 32 — Kim Warp”

Visit Ms. Warp’s website

___________________________________________________________________

The Cartoon Companion Reviews the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

This week’s cartoons, rated from 1 to 6 (6 being the tops, 1 being the opposite of the tops) courtesy of “Max” and “Simon” — see it all here.

__________________________________________________________________

From Slate, November 30, 2017, “New Yorker Cover illustrator Barry Blitt” Interviewed by Studio 360.

Hear the interview here.

__________________________________________________________________

The Sunday New York Times Book Review has very nice things to say about Paul Karasik & Mark Newgarden’s How To Read Nancy. Read it hereCongrats to Messrs. Karasik and Newgarden!

___________________________________________________________________

Release Party for World War 3 Illustrated…Opp Art Launch…Unnatural Election

World War 3 was founded in 1979 by Seth Tobocman and New Yorker cartoonist, Peter Kuper. All the below copy appears on Facebook’s Events page :

Tuesday December 5, 7pm at the SVA Amphitheater; 209 East 23rd Street, room: 311 —Join us in celebrating the release of comic book anthology World War 3 Illustrated Issue # 48 “Fight Fascism!”


—Also making its debut: the recent launch of the daily political art website: “Opp Art” -sponsored by The Nation magazine, Opp Art posts powerful artistic reactions from around the world five days a week. and Unnatural Election International artists from fine artists to illustrators respond to the 2016 election -curated by Andrea Arroyo
—Come see live comic book readings, art performances, and presentations by contributors to all these projects.

 

Tom Chitty Tells the Spill Why “7” and Not “6”; Upcoming Swann Auction Includes An Abundance of New Yorker Cartoon Art; Applause Applause: Ed Steed is a Grammy Nominee

Tom Chitty Tells the Spill Why “7” and Not “6”

In this past Monday Tilley Watch, I wrote the following about the Tom Chitty drawing above:

  Mr. Chitty went at this head-on which almost (almost) makes the fellows in the line-up look like they in a painting or photo on the wall. Maybe they are, but I don’t think so. I wondered why it was possibly a #7 missing from the line-up and not #6.

Mr, Chitty was kind enough to respond, and to send along a rough sketch of his drawing:

I thought you might be interested in an answer your question about my cartoon this week.  I’ve attached the original scribble of the idea — at that point there were only four crooks, but that felt too few, so I added one. The simple answer, as to why seven and not six is that it sounded funnier to me. Maybe it’s because seven is made of two syllables. I confess it was not a particularly long deliberation!

— To see more of Mr. Chitty’s work, visit his website here.

_________________________________________________________________

Upcoming Swann Auction Features An Abundance of New Yorker Cartoon Art

Swann’s December 14th auction includes a number of cartoon originals by the following New Yorker artists: Steinberg, Charles Addams, Abe Birnbaum, Peter Arno, Charles Barsotti, George Booth, Robert Day, R.O. Blechman, Arthur Getz, Theodore Haupt, Anatol Kovarsky, Marcellus Hall, Arnie Levin, Charles E. Martin (CEM), Joe Mirachi, Reginald Massie, Frank Modell, James Stevenson, Tom Toro, Richard Taylor, Harry Brown, Otto Soglow, Ronald Searle, Edward Koren, Jules Feiffer, and John Held, Jr.. Wow!

 — My thanks to Tom Toro for bringing the catalog to my attention.

View the entire catalog here.

______________________________________________________________________

Applause Applause: Ed Steed Is a Grammy Nominee

Ed Steeds Father John Misty cover art (above) has been nominated for a Grammy.  Read about it here.  Congrats to Mr. Steed!

A Canadian New Yorker?; The Not Yorker?; The Surreal McCoy’s Graphic Novel; Peter Kuper In Conversation at the New School; Liza Donnelly: A Funny Sea Change; New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor to Speak at Yale

A Canadian New Yorker?

From CBC News (Montreal), November 26, 2017, “Le Montrealer Imagines a Local Take on The New Yorker’s Covers” — this interesting piece on a Canadian exhibition of New Yorker inspired work. With a related piece on  similarly inspired exhibits.

   

____________________________________________

The Not Yorker?

From Artsy, November 28, 2017,  “The Website Giving Rejected New Yorker Covers a Second Chance” —   Read about it here.

_____________________________________________________________________

The Surreal McCoy’s Upcoming Graphic Novel

From Bleeding Cool, November 28, 2017, “A New Yorker Cartoonist Explores Her Iraqi/Jewish Roots in Comics — The Wolf of Baghdad”

_____________________________________________

Jose Munoz & Peter Kuper in Conversation

In a Special New York Comics and Picture-story Symposium,  Peter Kuper will be in conversation with Jose Munoz this Thursday at the New School. Details here.

____________________________________________

Liza Donnelly: A Funny Sea Change

From Medium, November 28, 2017, “A Funny Sea Change: One Step Forward in the Field of Humor” Liza Donnelly‘s take on this week’s historic issue of The New Yorker.

____________________________________________-

New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor to Speak at Yale

From Yale News, November 28, 2017, “Cartoon editor at the New Yorker to discuss ‘Laugh Lines'” …details here on Emma Allen’s talk this coming Thursday.

 

A Moose in The Hoose; Material Goods: The New Yorker Diary 2018 & Tilley Pins

A Moose In The Hoose

Here’s a fun looking book I ran into online yesterday.  Had never seen or heard of it before.  The author, Frank Sullivan, and illustrator, George Price, are familiar, of course. Mr. Price had quite a side career as an illustrator (the Spill library has a number of the books he illustrated, but not this one).

I believe that Mr. Price was the New Yorker‘s most prolific artist interpreter — that is to say, he never worked from his own ideas but relied entirely on writers.*  My source on this is Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s former art editor (and later cartoon editor), who was Mr. Price’s editor for nearly twenty years.

* The exception was Mr. Price’s one New Yorker cover (below), which, obviously, was caption-less. What a beauty!

 

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z including the cover of a Spill favorite collection of his, published in 1977:

Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. He contributed nearly 1300 cartoons to the New Yorker.

_________________________________________________________

Material Goods

Perhaps this should’ve been mentioned in yesterday’s Monday Tilley Watch… but it wasn’t. Several ads in this week’s New Yorker are worth noting.  The first is for the magazine’s wonderful yearly diary.  It’s usually loaded with cartoons. The ad copy says there’s “a cartoon on every page”…hmmm, I think the example shown in the ad, and the samples shown on the magazine’s store contradict that, but whatever. There are always plenty of cartoons,  meaning it might be the closest thing we’ve had as an annual collection these past many decades.

The other ad, headlined A Dash Of New Yorker Style , is for some of the stuff that is sold on the magazine’s “official store”; as one who is a sucker for anything Tilley, I think the keepers here are the Eustace Tilley pin and the butterfly that is usually fluttering just off of Eustace’s nose.

Below: the ads in this week’s New Yorker:

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of December 4, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

Back in February of 1996, the New Yorker celebrated its 71st anniversary with a “Special Women’s Issue.” Of the 23 cartoonists in the issue, 20 were men. The three women cartoonists were Victoria Roberts, Roz Chast, and Liza Donnelly. The cover, a take-off on Eustace Tilley, dubbed “Eustacia Tilley” was handled by a man, R.O. Blechman.

Now, just 21 years later, we have what I believe to be a first: this is the first issue of the New Yorker where the number of women artists outnumber the men (if anyone can provide an earlier issue where this was the case, please let me know). Of the 14 cartoonists contributing to this latest issue, 8 are women. The cover is by a woman as well. 

Before heading on to the cartoons and cartoonists, I note this modern Tilley take (below left)  on page 4, below the list of Contributors:

Poor Eustace!  He’s lost most of his facial features, and he seems to have gained a large strand of red licorice around his shoulders. Just as a reminder, I’ve placed Rea Irvin’s original Eustace alongside, lest we forget.

Now on to the business at hand (at eye?). The first cartoon is the not-too-often-seen -anymore people-in-line drawing.  Memorable people-in-line moments that come to mind: the line waiting for soup in Seinfeld’s  “Soup Nazi” episode, and this classic  Woody Allen scene. Mr. Vey’s caption has a faint Horton Hatches The Egg-ness about it. The drawing itself features an abundance of stanchions that immediately reminded me of this wonderful captionless cartoon by Bill Woodman that appeared in The New Yorker, May 8, 1978:  

Five pages later is Sofia Warren’s second-ever New Yorker drawing (her first appeared last week). Sometimes New Yorker drawings drive me to the closest dictionary (via a search box) to clarify some word or phrase I’ve felt I generally understood (but didn’t really). There are two drawings in this issue that caused me to seek further definition.  The use of “vortex”  in Ms. Warren’s drawing was the first. Webster‘s defines it as “something resembling a whirlpool”  — Aha! That’s in the ballpark of what I thought it meant. Ms. Warren, confronted the challenge of drawing a stand-alone whirlpool by giving  us an energetic mass somewhat resembling birds nest pasta. Works for me (both the vortex and the pasta).

 

Three pages later a father/son factory “Someday this will be all yours” drawing. Updated, I suppose, with a reference to offshore shell companies.  In tried and true trope fashion, Mr. Noth has shown us framed images of the company’s previous generations of owners. Next up, a mash-up drawing by newbie, Jon Adams. Here we have the Michelin Man (in a sash). I had to look that up as well. I didn’t picture him in a sash — apparently, he doesn’t always wear one. The rubbery fellow is mixed up with the famous Michelin Guide. Also apparently, the Michelin Man is a Michelin Guide food critic who has been escorted out of a restaurant by a chef. The restaurant apparently (yes, the third “apparently”) does not allow customers to wear sashes.  An awful lot of apparentlys here. 

Three pages later another newbie, but not as new as the previous newbie.  In this Teresa Burns Parkhurst drawing both of the folks seem to be speaking (both have open mouths). I suppose it doesn’t really matter who’s doing the talking.  The caption works either way.  I was surprised that this drawing and the last were so close together as they are graphically similar.

In another three pages we come to the always welcome art of Joe Dator.  I can’t quite explain how (or why?), but I feel Mr. Dator brings a Mad Magazine/National Lampoon-quality to the New Yorker.  And that, of course, is a very very good thing. 

Four pages later is a Roz Chast drawing — it’s the second drawing of the issue that took me to the search box for a clear definition.  I’ve heard “life hacks” for awhile now, but never took the half-second to look it up. Well, okay…got it now.

Four pages later a Tom Chitty police line-up drawing. Mr. Chitty went at this head-on which almost (almost) makes the fellows in the line-up look like they in a painting or photo on the wall. Maybe they are, but I don’t think so. I wondered why it was possibly a #7 missing from the line-up and not #6.  Anyway, funny idea. On the opposite page is a Liana Finck drawing — the style recognizable from across the room. Nice grizzly bear.

Twenty-one pages later (!) is a Liza Donnelly drawing of an off the grid little piggy. I can’t tell if he’s happy to be off the grid or not.  Has he made the right decision for him or herself?  Only the little piggy knows. Opposite Ms. Donnelly’s drawing is a Frank Cotham drawing that caused me to, as Bob Dylan once said (in the song “Belle Isle”), “stay for awhile.” I couldn’t decide who was “clinging to territory”— the dog or the guy. I still can’t decide.

Four pages later a drawing by another newbie, Maggie Larson (but this isn’t her first New Yorker drawing). Ms. Larson’s style here reminds me of someone we don’t hear about much anymore: Charles Sauers. Both Ms. Larson and Mr. Sauers work employs a particular perspective as well as simple line drawing.   Here’s a Sauers drawing from the August 20, 1984 New Yorker:

And the last drawing of the issue (not counting the work on the Caption Contest page) is by Kate Curtis. A really well drawn piece, solidly in the Charles Addams school of everything.

So that’s that for this week…other than mentioning my campaign to reinstate Rea Irvin’s Talk of the Town masthead.  Here’s Mr. Irvin’s original.  Perhaps someday it will get back to where it once belonged. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2007, 2008, and 2009 New Yorker Cartoon Yearbooks

The three New Yorker Cartoon Yearbooks  shown above were published following the anvil heavy Complete Cartoons of the New Yorker that appeared in 2004 (and the lighter updated paperback Complete Cartoons in 2006).  I can’t tell you how thrilled I was to see these Cartoon Yearbooks. Why? For starters, they are hardcover, and are 9″x12″ — the size of the Albums of the Golden Era (such as we’ve been discussing these past many Sundays). I note that a cartoonist colleague, Trevor Hoey was responsible for the design.  My hat’s off to you, Mr. Hoey.  Job well done. The 2009 Cartoon Yearbook was (sigh) the last time a non-thematic New Yorker cartoon collection appeared in hardcover. 

Each of these Yearbooks has an introductory piece, each of them jokey. To paraphrase Bruce Springsteen, someday we’ll look back on these and maybe they’ll all seem funny.  But for now, these intros cause me to think of what is written on the inside flap of the very first New Yorker Album: “Oh, just look inside!” 

The Yearbooks were designed with care, using decent paper stock, ensuring you don’t see the drawings bleeding through from the other side (as was the case in the behemoth 2004 collection). The back covers lists all the artists represented, a welcome practice that began with the 1958 New Yorker Album of Sports & Games and carried on with most, but not all, subsequent Albums.  There is also an Index to the artists represented, something that I find respectful to the individual artists.  

How I wish these Annuals were continued; they were well-produced (produced in-house) hardcover books definitely built to last, unlike what came after them: the magazine format Cartoons of the Year, published from 2010 -2016.  Sometimes referred to as bookazines, there is nothing bookish about them; they are magazines, containing advertisements, and special features that never ran in the New Yorker (including several pieces by yours truly). It’s true that people collect magazines that are meaningful to them, but if I had to guess, I’d guess that a whole lot more people have book shelves in their homes containing hardcover New Yorker cartoon collections  than magazine shelves holding New Yorker “bookazine” collections.

Going back to the Yearbooks, I believe this is the perfect format for collecting New Yorker cartoons.  Whether it’s done annually or every five years or ten years, it’s how the work deserves to be presented: no-frills, no banners, no cover hype, no advertisements, no jokey forewords or informed forewords or essays — just the facts, ma’am, or should I say, just the cartoons.    

Below: left – right, the Artists Represented on the back covers of the 2007, 2008, 2009 Yearbooks.