Steinberg biography; new Updike on Art

 

From the Library Journal, their Fall preview lists a third book of observations on art by John Updike, Always Looking: Essays on Art (Knopf). His first two: Just Looking (Knopf, 1989), and Still Looking (Knopf, 2005).

 

Also from The Library Journal,  a listing for Saul Steinberg: A Biography (Nan A. Talese: Doubleday) by Deirdre Bair. This should be fascinating.  According to the Library Journal’s listing, the author was allowed to “rummage through 177 boxes of never-before-seen materials to write this biography.”

Link here for the Library Journal’s post.

Looking for more Steinberg? Harold Rosenberg’s Saul Steinberg (Knopf, 1978) and Joel Smith’s Steinberg at The New Yorker ( Abrams, 2005) are worth seeking out, as are all of Steinbergs collections.

 

Brief Q & A with Bob Mankoff; Working for The Man @ MoCCA; More Blown Covers

From Creative Week New York, “Creative Week Session Spotlight: A Session with Bob Mankoff of The New Yorker”

Link  here for more info on Mr. Mankoff’s appearance.

 

From The Beat, May 1, 2012, “Working for The Man: MoCCa 2012” ( with Shannon Wheeler and Liza Donnelly content).

 

From NPR’s All Things Considered, May 1, 2012, audio: “‘Blown Covers’: Not Ready For the Newstand”

New York Times: The demise of sports cartoons; Bob Staake at USC; Museum of Comic & Cartoon Art Fest 2012

Richard Sandomir has written a great (but sad) piece for The New York Times on the demise of sports cartooning, “Lost Occupation, Lost Art  as Sports Cartooning Declines” — sorry, no link:  check out the NYTs homepage, scroll down to INSIDE NYTS.COM and look for the sports illustration.

 

From dailytrojan.com, April 19, 2012, “Cartoonist Bob Staake began his career at USC”

 

The Museum of Comic & Cartoon Art’s MoCCA Fest 2012 is this weekend (April 28th & 29th).  Check out the guests, panels etc.

All Cartoonists Are Actors

“If I’m drawing a certain type of character, I try to get into the spirit of the thing – and my wife complains about the faces I make while I’m working. All cartoonists, I guess, are actors in a way.”

— George Price to Jud Hurd, Cartoonist Profiles, March 1975

 

If you can find it, Jud Hurd’s Price interview is worth seeking out. Price (pictured above) who died in 1995 at the age of 93, is best remembered for his unparalleled mathematical drawing style, characterized by the split pen line created by his crow quill.

 

Let us pause briefly and consider the idea of Mrs. Price watching Mr. Price draw.  I wonder how many spouses or partners make a habit of watching their cartoonist mate draw.

 

I could never work with an audience.  From time-to-time while drawing I’ll realize I’m mimicking the face I’m working on. My only audience at those moments would be our Jack Russell Terrier, Bernie, who sometimes plants himself under my desk, at my feet. If there is such a thing as an audience of one, Bernie qualifies. Once I realize he’s staring at me, I can’t work. I cap my pen, leave my desk and do my best to resolve his issue (after all, he’s not there to be entertained — he wants something, such as the cat’s bowl of milk).

 

But I digress.  Heading back to the Price interview, it was “All cartoonists …are actors…” that really caught my attention.  I’ve long thought of cartoonists as spies, sponges, stage directors, costume designers, lighting experts, set designers, script writers (script doctors!), hair stylists, haberdashers – well, you get the idea.  But until I read this Price interview it never occurred to me that we were (possibly) actors as well.

 

This explains the number of cartoonists who have sought and seek the stage.  Otto Soglow was famous for his love of the stage, and Thurber appeared in his own Thurber Carnival on Broadway,  winning a special Tony for the adapted script. Peter Arno performed in summer stock, as well as investing his talents on Broadway as a producer and playwright (he also did time in Hollywood making a brief appearance in a 1937 film, Artists and Models). Frank Modell appeared in Woody Allen’s  Stardust Memories. In more recent times, Victoria Roberts has won acclaim for her stage appearances as Nona Appleby.  And then there are the numerous cartoonists currently involved in stand-up comedy.

 

So are all cartoonists actors?  I suppose you could say (super-duper groan alert!) some are drawn to it.