Blitt’s 15th Trump NYer Cover; Brand New NYer Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion; Library of Congress’s “Drawn To Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists”; More Spills: Cartoonists to Unveil a Mural in Brooklyn, Reginald Marsh Diary Entries, An $800.00 Edition of The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

Blitt’s 15th Trump New Yorker Cover

The New Yorker sometimes releases its next cover several days early. Today is one of those days. According to the magazine’s covers editor, this is Barry Blitt’s 15th Trump New Yorker cover. For more on Mr. Blitt and his cover, go here.

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Brand New New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion

If you’re looking for New Yorker cartoon dissection, this is the place for you.  “Max” & “Simon” take you through every cartoon in the latest New Yorker and assign each a rating of 1 – 6 (6 being the top). 

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Library of Congress’s Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists

This title is now available.  Read all about it here!

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There’s a new mural in town: New Yorker cartoonists Corey Pandolph and Drew Dernavich will reveal the piece this Sunday at Crystal Lake Brooklyn at 647 Grand St.. The Unveiling Party, from 6 -9, is open to the public.

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The Diary Review, has a short piece on Reginald Marsh.  Read it here.

Here’s Mr. Marsh’s entry on the A-Z:

 

 

 

Reginald Marsh (above) Born in Paris, March 14, 1898, died in 1954: New Yorker work: 1925 -1944. More information: http://www.dcmooregallery.com/artists/reginald-marsh

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The Spill has been following information being released on the upcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (two volumes totaling 1536 pages). The publisher (previously Blackdog & Leventhal, now Running Press) now lists a deluxe version for $800.00. No info (yet) on what to expect for that much dough.

Here’s a screenshot of the listing — the deluxe version is at the bottom, sans cover image:

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of March 5, 2018; Cover Update: The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

Hooray for Hollywood?  This week’s cover (artist: Chris Ware) reminds us — not that we need reminding –that Tinsel Town is a troubled town. 

Shout out to the Cartier folks for the pretty street lamp that greets you as you open the magazine. Nice also to see the photo of David Bowie (however much I disagree with this current usage of the Goings On About Town opening page, i.e., with a nearly full page photo. It never fails to trick me into thinking I’m seeing an ad).

Speaking of being in disagreement, the stand-in remains in place for Rea Irvin’s iconic design for the Talk Of The Town.

Here’s what the original looks like:

And here’s the stand-in:

Alrighty then, on to the issue’s cartoons. 

The very first cartoon is by David Sipress.  A somewhat retired theme (torture) returns. Torture rack drawings popped up more ages ago, replaced (if my unscientific memory search is slightly accurate) with another kind of torture: prisoners hanging by handcuffs up on dungeon walls. I feel for the fellow in Mr. Sipress’s drawing who is about to undergo the “procedure.”

Five pages later a couple of “Casablanca”-era Humphrey Bogart-like fellas at the end of a pier, courtesy of Carolita Johnson. As discussed last week (Frank Cotham’s drawing of thugs planning just such a pier push) this is a standard situation a lot of cartoonists are attracted to (including this one). Here’s one more — a personal favorite of mine. 

On the very next page, a robot drawing by Navied Mahdavian, whose debut drawing was last week. I recall Zach Kanin bringing robots back into usage a few years ago (or maybe it was Roz Chast…or was it someone else. New Yorker cartoon robot aficionados please advise). In this particular case I was a bit worried that the scientists had their backs to the dancing duo. Perhaps it was this portion of the caption: “They [the robots] don’t appear to want to take over…” [bolded words mine]. Hmmm, if there’s any doubt, any doubt at all as to the robots’ intentions, perhaps it’s best to observe them in an fortified isolation booth or something.

Three pages later a Danny Shanahan drawing. Fun drawing perfectly synced with a wonderful Shanahan-esque caption. If I was awarding ribbons as they do over on the Cartoon Companion, I’d pin one on this drawing (and on the P. C. Vey drawing that we’ll get to in a minute).

Eight pages later, a Roz Chast NYC-centered alien “take us to your leader”-type drawing. I enjoyed examining the screens on the aliens’ chests. Would love to see Chastian aliens in color.

On the very next page (and I should say, very nicely sized and placed on the page) is a terrif Chris Weyant drawing. The caption’s sterling construction reminds me of captions once written by the likes of James Stevenson, Donald Reilly, and Charles Saxon.  Applause applause!

Two pages later, a real gem by P.C. Vey. A cave couple. Mr. Vey’s world is such a fun treat (and isn’t that why we love cartoons?). I find it hysterical that:

1. The cave woman looks nothing like a cave woman (her hair’s perfect and she’s wearing a somewhat stylish shift).  

2. The cave man is so well-groomed (both hair and beard).

The next two drawings (the first by newbie Pia Guerra, and the next by veteran-newbie Will McPhail) reminded me, in their construction (not style) of ancient friezes:

If you placed a ruler along the base of the feet in each drawing, you’d see that every foot (and one paw) touches the edge of the ruler (with the exception of Ms. Guerra’s wolf’s right paw, and a kicked-up foot on the person to the extreme right of Mr. McPhail’s drawing). There is no reason to note this other than that I don’t recall ever seeing two frieze-like drawings back-to-back before.

Four pages following the second frieze  cartoon is a Maggie Dai Atlas drawing that sent me to the search box. Now I know what “leg day” refers to.  On the very next page, the instantly recognizable style of Drew Dernavich, who delivers an Oscars drawing.

Three pages later a delightful Barbara Smaller drawing. Nice to see bigger picture work by her. On the very next page, an Ed Steed sports drawing (basketball). Five pages later Paul Noth references  fine art.  I recall that  Roz Chast handled Venus on a cover not too very long ago.  My memory is that Addams liked to work with Venus too.  Am I wrong, but aren’t bathtubs the preferred bathroom fixture for home births rather than sinks?  Of course, it being cartoonland and all, anything’s possible.

Case in point: the last drawing of the issue, by JAK (otherwise known as Jason Adam Katzenstein).  We see a card game with a Wolf Blizter-like guy in an open collared rumpled shirt, a well dressed woman (she’s wearing pearls), and a wolf(?) in a tuxedo.

  The popped eyes and slack jaw suggest animation as inspiration, like so:

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Cover Update: The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

If you’ve been following the Spill ‘s coverage of cover art (or lack of) for The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (due in October from Black Dog & Leventhal) you might find it interesting that we now have the below image to contemplate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Bystander #7 On Its Way!; More Spills…Ken Krimstein’s New Book; New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons Cover (Cont’d)

Hungry for comic humor?  American Bystander, now up to its 7th number, will do it for you. 

  Here are just some of the contributors in this issue : Charles Barsotti, R.O. Blechman (who’s provided the cover for #7), Harry Bliss, George Booth, M.K. Brown, Roz Chast, Tom Chitty, Randall Enos, Drew Friedman, Rick Geary, Sam Gross, Tom Hachtman, John Jonik, Lars Kenseth, Stephen Kroninger, Peter Kuper, Sara Lautman, Stan Mack, Brian McConnachie, P.S. Mueller, Mimi Pond, Mike Sacks, Maria Scrivan, Rich Sparks, Ed Subitzky, Shannon Wheeler, P.C.Vey, and Jack Ziegler.

Think they don’t make magazines like this anymore?…well actually, they do.  

  Go here to find out how you can get hold of American Bystander  #7.

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Krimstein’s New Book…Here’s New Yorker cartoonist Ken Krimstein holding a galley of his forthcoming graphic biography, The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth.  Photos by Alex Sinclair. The book is due this September, published by Bloomsbury. Mr. Krimstein’s previous book was Kvetch As Kvetch Can. More info here on the publisher’s website.

Link here to see Mr. Krimstein’s work.

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The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons Cover (Cont’d)…

I’m fascinated by the “journey” sometimes taken by a new book’s cover as it is listed online (my fascination probably began with the posting of a dummy cover for my Peter Arno book). 

The upcoming heavyweight New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons cover went from its initial listing (“No Image Available”) to a dummy cover (in black) to the finished cover (in red), then back to its dummy cover, and now (at least on Amazon) back to “No Image Available”… like so:

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online, Week of February 11, 2018; Blitt in Canada; More E. Simms Campbell; More Spills: Whither the New Yorker Encylopedia of Cartoons Cover?…Cartoons No More at The Harvard Business Review?

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to this week’s Daily Cartoons: Jason Adam Katzenstein, Brendan Loper (twice), Carolita Johnson, Peter Kuper and Sara Lautman.  (No contributing New Yorker cartoonists over on the Daily Shouts this week).  The subjects: politics (of course!), Valentine’s Day, and the Olympics. See it all here.

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Blitt in Canada

From Blogto, “The illustrative Wit of Barry Blitt” — news of Mr. Blitt speaking way up yonder. His latest book, shown above left, is Blitt.

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More E. Simms Campbell

Day 2 of Attempted Bloggery‘s Campbell Fest. See it here!

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…The cover for the upcoming two volume New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons  (due in October) has disappeared from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the publisher’s website (Blackdog & Leventhal). In its place is the original image posted online, a temp, shown below left, carrying the text “Cover Not Final”. The final cover (or is it?) bearing an illustration (not a cartoon) appears below right.  Stay tuned.

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And Another One Bites the Dust? New Yorker cartoonist Tom Toro has told the Spill that The Harvard Business Review has informed him it will no longer accept cartoon submissions. 

 

 

 

Cover Revealed For 2 Volume New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

Well here it is: the final cover for Black Dog & Leventhal’s upcoming two volume slip-cased New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons.  The cover illustration is by Richard McGuire (the pub date is October 2 of this year).  

A reminder of what to expect (from the publisher’s website):

3,000 cartoons [in] more than 250 categories of recurring New Yorker themes and visual tropes, including cartoons on banana peels, meeting St. Peter, being stranded on a desert island, snowmen, lion tamers, Adam and Eve, the Grim Reaper, and dogs, of course.

A Kenseth in The White House; Brief Interview of Interest: Ben Schwartz; PR: The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons Listed

A Kenseth in The White House

Lars Kenseth posted on social media that one of his New Yorker drawings (shown above. It was published January 30, 2017) found its way to the White House.

Here’s the link to the New York Times story. As Mr. Kenseth suggests in his Facebook post, to see the mention of his drawing scroll to the final paragraph.

Link here to Mr. Kenseth’s website.

For more, here’s a recent Spill piece on Mr. Kenseth’s drawings.

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Brief Interview of Interest: Ben Schwartz

From Scarsdale 10583, January 30, 2018, “Balancing Act: A Doctor Who Creates Cartoons for The New Yorker”— this interview with Ben Schwartz.

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…The listing shown below recently popped up online. The “Semi-Serious” in the title seems to be a bit a cross-promotion with a 2015 documentary starring the magazine’s former cartoon editor, Bob Mankoff.  Note that we are not shown the final cover (it says so right there: “Cover Not Final”), but it’s a start! Additional copy from the publisher appears below in green. Note to the publisher, Black Dog & Leventhal: you might want to correct the length of Mankoff’s tenure: it was close to twenty years, not thirty years.

Further copy from the publisher’s website:

The is the most ingenious collection of New Yorker cartoons published in book form, The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons is a prodigious, slip-cased, two-volume, 1,600-page A-to-Z curation of cartoons from the magazine from 1924 to the present. Mankoff–for thirty years the cartoon editor of the New Yorker–organizes nearly 3,000 cartoons into more than 250 categories of recurring New Yorker themes and visual tropes, including cartoons on banana peels, meeting St. Peter, being stranded on a desert island, snowmen, lion tamers, Adam and Eve, the Grim Reaper, and dogs, of course. The result is hilarious and Mankoff’s commentary throughout adds both depth and whimsy. The collection also includes a foreword by New Yorker editor David Remnick. This is stunning gift for the millions of New Yorker readers and anyone looking for some humor in the evolution of social commentary.