Fave Book Find of the Week: Frueh On The Theatre: 1906 – 1962; Sam Marlow Pencilled; New Yorker Cartoonists in Life & Judge; Signed By The Cartoonist; Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker!

Here’s a wonderful collection of the late great Al Frueh’s theater work for The New Yorker and elsewhere. The New York Times had Al Hirschfeld, The New Yorker had Al Frueh.  Mr. Frueh’s New Yorker colleague, Brendan Gill provides an informative and insightful intro. For more on Mr. Frueh, here’s a Spill piece about him, “The First New Yorker Cartoon” — posted way back in 2011.

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Sam Marlow Pencilled

Sam Marlow, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker May 9, 2016 is the latest subject of Jane Mattimoe’s splendid Case For Pencils blog.  See Mr. Marlow’s tools of the trade here.

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Buchanan’s Files Continue on Mike Lynch’s Site

If New Yorker cartoonists work not published in the New Yorker is your thing, then head on over to Mike Lynch’s site where you’ll find a number of Life and Judge cartoons from the 1930s. All the scans courtesy of Dick Buchanan, including the Ned Hilton drawing above (Life, 1935). Mr. Hilton’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from May 19, 1934 — June 15, 1957.

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Signed By The Cartoonist

Stephen Nagler’s Attempted Bloggery site has been posting signed books by some famous cartoonists, Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, and William Steig among them.  Check them out here.

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Reading Every New Yorker

And speaking of Ms. Hokinson, here’s her beautiful New Yorker cover from the summer of 1928.  The fascinating blog, A New Yorker State of Mind takes a very close look within.  Read it here.

Fave Bookstore Find of the Day; Nice Price At a Price

Fave Bookstore Find of the Day

The other day while browsing around my favorite used bookstore, Rodgers Book Barn, with two New Yorker pals (John Cuneo and Danny Shanahan) the above book caught my eye because of the Thurber drawing.  My eyes widened when I realized I had never seen this particular book before (or had I?).  It turned out to be a British revised edition of How To Raise A Dog In the City and In The Suburbs, published by Simon & Schuster in 1938. This new found edition, retitled, The Town Dog: Education Breeding, Grooming, Health, Love-Life,  was published by Harvill Press in 1954.  Below is the US second printing of How To Raise A Dog…(this dust jacket was screen-grabbed, as my copy lacks one).  Thurberites will recognize one of the co-authors, Ann Honeycutt, for whom Thurber famously carried a torch. See either Burton Bernstein’s bio Thurber, or Harrison Kinney’s Thurber: His Life and Times for a whole lot more on that subject.

Thurber’s drawings in the book (any edition published in any country) are really fun. They’re Thurber dog drawings — how could they not be fun!

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A Nice (George) Price At A Price

Stephen Nadler, over at Attempted Bloggery has posted the particulars for something you don’t see up for auction all that much: an original George Price drawing, with color. Go here to see all the scans and read all about it.

 

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss; Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss

Harry Bliss, a New Yorker contributor since 1998,  will speak at the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History on September 18th.  All the details here.

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Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation

Gregory d’Alessio, a New Yorker contributor  — he contributed from 1934 – 1940 — who doesn’t get much attention is finally getting some over on Stephen Nadler’s Attempted BloggerySee it here.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Speaking of an artist who doesn’t get much attention, next up is Abner Dean (the entire series, with the exception of the Absolut ads, courtesy of SPX’s Warren Bernard). All of Mr. Dean’s ads are for the Aetna Insurance Group, and are presented chronologically, clockwise beginning from the upper left, from 1945 -1951.

Mr. Dean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC. According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.” He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 4: Steinberg; Liza Donnelly Live-Draws The Late Show with Stephen Colbert; Rejected New Yorker Covers by Whittington, Higgins; Video: New York City in the 1920s

Steinberg did ad work?  You bet.  As with William Steig, a Steinberg Part 2 will be posted at some later time. 

Warren Bernard,  Executive Director of SPX, is the one responsible for researching & gathering all these images. My thanks to Warren for allowing them to appear here.

Here are the dates for these ads:  Emerson, 1948; House & Garden, 1955; Morton International, 1966; Jones & Lamson, 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Steinberg’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

 

Saul Steinberg  (above) Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

CBS News Resident Cartoonist, Liza Donnelly, visited the Ed Sullivan Theater  (yeah yeah yeah!) the other day to draw The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Here’s an article on The Huffington Post about her visit.  And go here to see more of her Late Show drawings and read what she had to say about the experience.

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Rejected New Yorker Covers by Whittington, Higgins

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery continues its look at proposed (and ultimately rejected) New Yorker covers. 

In the past few days we’ve seen this one by Donald Higgins, and in AB’s latest post, one by Larry Whittington. See and read all about them here.

 

 

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Video: New York City in the 1920s

If you have twelve minutes to spare, here’s a fun video of  New York City in the 1920s from Hey New York State. The screen grab shows Peter Arno tussling Alexander Woollcott’s hair (you can see that that happens at the 11:34 mark — it’s very brief). Other highlights: George Gershwin rehearsing, Chaplin playing piano, Fanny Brice singing (the video is mostly silent, but Ms. Brice is heard), some waterfront footage and Manhattan street scenes galore…check it out here. 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1: Peter Arno; Shanahan’s Sharks

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1

Warren Bernard, author of the wonderful book, Cartoons For Victory, as well as Executive Director of The Small Press Expo, has generously allowed the Spill access to hundreds of images he has collected that depict advertising work executed by New Yorker cartoonists. The Spill will post these from time-to-time. This is not an all-inclusive survey, but a look back at some interesting work mostly lost to time (many of these ads were unknown to me until recently).

We’ll start with a handful of ads featuring the unmistakable drawings of Peter Arno. Arno’s drawings were in high demand by Madison Avenue during the four decades he contributed to The New Yorker. They were the lucrative sideline that went a long way to helping him live the Park Avenue penthouse life he at times lived.

I’m only showing a few of his ads here, and not including the entire run of Pepsi-Cola ads that so riled Harold Ross (the New Yorker’s founder and first editor) — those will be for another time.  Also for another time: the Gem Razor ad campaign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Bernard has helpfully identified the date of each ad:  Alemite (1949); Kindness (1968); Calvert Reserve (1944); Jockey (1939); Ry-Krisp (1941)

Here’s Mr. Arno’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

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Shanahan’s Sharks

Attempted Bloggery has found a Danny Shanahan New Yorker cover that’s been enhanced by the artist himself.

Mr. Nadler, who runs the AB, notes it’s a fine way to kick off the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week.

Link here to see Danny Shanahan’s New Yorker work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.