Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 32: George Price

It’s more than fair to say no one drew like George Price. His work looks like a cartoon schematic.  And then there are those somewhat mysterious split lines. Looking at one of his original drawings up real close you can see that the splits were created by his drawing over and over (and over) his original pen stroke. He’d build up the line, and sometimes be off enough to create a parallel line. A fascinating style.

 Surprising (to me anyway) that it’s taken til Part 32 of this series to get to Mr. Price as he is a New Yorker cartoon god. He contributed to the magazine for 62 years, becoming one of only 23 members of the K Club (his work was published over a thousand times in The New Yorker). The database shows the exact number to be 1, 279 (including his one cover, above right).   

Here are just some of many ads by Mr. Price, all courtesy (as usual in this series) of SPX’s Warren Bernard.  All Mr. Bernard’s work — the researching, scanning, organizing, sharing — is greatly appreciated.

Below: two Durkee’s ads: on the left from 1955, and the other 1957. Scotch Tape, 1947; Peterman Ant Killer, 1946; American Express, 1954; Del Monte, 1969

 

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Price Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991.  To see Mr. Price’s cartoon collections visit the Spill‘s Cartoonists Library.

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 31: Ed Nofziger

  A brief return to the advertising series brought to you through the generosity of SPX’s Warren Bernard. Here’s work by Ed Nofziger, who contributed cartoons to the New Yorker from 1936 through 1940.

 Link to his obit from the L.A. Times, Nov. 11, 2000. 

 Link here to Mr. Nofziger’s IMDb profile

Below: Mr. Nofziger and a self portrait from Best Cartoons of the Year 1943.

Below: Mr. Nofziger’s first New Yorker cartoon, November 14, 1936. Great drawing!

And here are a few American Express ads. The first two are from 1949, and the last two from 1952.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

On this always somewhat hard-to-define week between Christmas Day and New Years Day, these are the New Yorker cartoonists who figured into either the Daily cartoon or Daily Shouts:

*A Daily cartoon by Mort Gerberg:  a skier sees a warning sign(post).

*Another installment of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper” series on Daily Shouts.

*An animated Daily cartoon by Sharon Levy .

*Lars Kenseth’s illustrations for Rejected Versions of “The Gift of the Maji”  — a  Zack Wortman Daily Shouts piece.

All of these can be seen on newyorker.com, either here (Daily Cartoon) or here (Daily Shouts)

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

  Ms. Hokinson, one of the New Yorker‘s earliest stars (Peter Arno was the other) makes her second solo appearance in this series of ads with these two drawings for Flit, both from 1935.  My thanks again to SPX’s Warren Bernard for sharing these ads with us.

Helen Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

*For more reading on Ms. Hokinson there’s no better place to go but Liza Donnelly’s  Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Foreword by Jules Feiffer.  Preface by Lee Lorenz.

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween; Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”; Tom Toro in The Paris Review; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush; Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist?

Liza Donnelly Draws Halloween

From Liza Donnelly, Halloween drawings for CBS This MorningSee them here

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Andy Borowitz On His Work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker cartoon”

From Poynter, October 31, 2017 —“Satirist Andy Borowitz Explains the Fine Art of Lampooning Trump” —  the interview by James Warren includes this quote from Mr. Borowitz describing his work: “It’s almost like the verbal equivalent of a New Yorker Cartoon.”

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Tom Toro in The Paris Review

Tom Toro will be illustrating one sentence at a time for The Paris Review in an eight part series,  The Complete Sentence.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 21: Addams for Sani-Flush

Thanks to the generosity of Warren Bernard, the series of New Yorker cartoonists advertising work continues on. Here are four Sani-Flush ads by the great Charles Addams (it being Halloween you just know that Mr. Addams would turn up here on the Spill).  All these ads are dated 1942.

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Steinberg: Artiste or Cartoonist

From Escapeintolife.com, “Toon Musings: Saul Steinberg / Artiste or Grubby Cartoonist”

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 17: Sam Cobean

No New Yorker cartoonist milked the humorous possibilities of (mostly female) total nudity like the late Sam Cobean (an example above), but you wouldn’t know it by the ads below. Mr. Cobean’s two collections, Cobean’s Naked Eye, and The Cartoons of Cobean (arranged and selected by Steinberg, with an Introduction by Mr. Cobean’s good friend, Charles Addams, published posthumously) are easily found online (Abebooks is a reliable destination). 

These ads, like every other part of this series (save the Absolut ads) were provided by the Executive Director of SPX, Warren Bernard. My continued thanks to Mr. Bernard for his generosity.

Ad dates:  top row, both 1946. Bottom row, left: 1948. Zippo ad: 1950

 

 

Mr. Cobean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z

 

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. New Yorker work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/