Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 17: Sam Cobean

No New Yorker cartoonist milked the humorous possibilities of (mostly female) total nudity like the late Sam Cobean (an example above), but you wouldn’t know it by the ads below. Mr. Cobean’s two collections, Cobean’s Naked Eye, and The Cartoons of Cobean (arranged and selected by Steinberg, with an Introduction by Mr. Cobean’s good friend, Charles Addams, published posthumously) are easily found online (Abebooks is a reliable destination). 

These ads, like every other part of this series (save the Absolut ads) were provided by the Executive Director of SPX, Warren Bernard. My continued thanks to Mr. Bernard for his generosity.

Ad dates:  top row, both 1946. Bottom row, left: 1948. Zippo ad: 1950

 

 

Mr. Cobean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z

 

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. New Yorker work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated…and a Bonus; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 16: Steig Remington Rand Shaver Ads:

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

If you like your New Yorker cartoons poked and prodded and looked at this way and that, the Cartoon Companion is for you. This particular CC post comes with a bonus: a look at a rough sketch by New Yorker cartoonist, Amy Hwang.   See it here. 

______________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 16: Steig Remington Rand Shaver Ads

As promised early on in this series, William Steig has returned (and will return again). Here are four ads he did for Remington Electric Shaver, all in 1937. As always, these images are courtesy of Warren Bernard of SPX, who put in all the effort finding, scanning, and then sending everything over to the Spill on an electric silver platter. 

Here’s Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss; Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss

Harry Bliss, a New Yorker contributor since 1998,  will speak at the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History on September 18th.  All the details here.

__________________________________________________________________________

Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation

Gregory d’Alessio, a New Yorker contributor  — he contributed from 1934 – 1940 — who doesn’t get much attention is finally getting some over on Stephen Nadler’s Attempted BloggerySee it here.

________________________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Speaking of an artist who doesn’t get much attention, next up is Abner Dean (the entire series, with the exception of the Absolut ads, courtesy of SPX’s Warren Bernard). All of Mr. Dean’s ads are for the Aetna Insurance Group, and are presented chronologically, clockwise beginning from the upper left, from 1945 -1951.

Mr. Dean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC. According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.” He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 12: Gluyas Williams

According to Genius in Disguise , Thomas Kunkel’s must-read biography of The New Yorker’s founder and first editor, Harold Ross, Gluyas Williams “was the artistic equivalent of E.B. White, in that to Ross (and to thousands of fans) he simply could do no wrong.”

In that same book (pp. 333-335) there’s a fun section about Ross’s “secret” project: running Mr. William’s Wedding series (16 drawings) all at once in the magazine. It appeared in the issue of June 5, 1948.

Note: All of the scans (except for the Absolut Vodka campaign)  in this on-going series of ads by New Yorker cartoonists are courtesy of SPX’s Executive Director, Warren Bernard.  

 

 

 

 

 

Dates of ads: Log Cabin Syrup, 1934; GE, 1941; Texaco, 1942; McCreery & Co., 1926; Bristol Brass, 1945. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Williams’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Gluyas Williams (photo above) Born, San Francisco, 1888. Died, Boston, Mass., 1982. One of the pillars of Harold Ross’s stable of artists, and one of Ross’s favorite cartoonists. His beautiful full page drawings were a regular feature in the magazine. Mr. Williams illustrated a number of Robert Benchley’s collections, providing the cover art as well as illustrations. NYer work: March 13, 1926 – Aug 25, 1951. Key collections: The Gluyas Williams Book ( Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1929), The Gluyas Williams Gallery (Harper, 1956). Website: http://www.gluyaswilliams.com/

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 10: Otto Soglow

Deep in the dog days of summer seems a good time to pick up the Spill’s series of advertising work by New Yorker cartoonists. Credit and thanks goes out to the Executive Director of SPX, Warren Bernard for allowing his efforts to be shown here.  In Part 10 we see a selection by Otto “The Little King” Soglow, who contributed to The New Yorker for 49 years (1925- 1974). 

His work is still seen in today’s New Yorker, with his “spot” drawings appearing in The Talk of The Town along with Tom Bachtell’s work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dates for ads: Pabst Blue Ribbon, 1941; USS, 1967; Nabisco, 1950s; Pepsi, 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Otto Soglow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974. Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.

Flake’s “Mama Tried” on IFC’s 2018 Slate of Projects; Books of Interest: Seth, Ben Katchor; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 7: Charles Saxon

Flake’s “Mama Tried” on IFC ‘s 2018 Slate of Projects

From Deadline Hollywood, July 29, 2017, “IFC Sets 2018 Slate…” — in a list of projects following this sentence:

IFC has given episodic script orders to the following projects:

is:

Mama Tried
A show about the seamy underbelly of new motherhood, Mama Triedfollows the struggles (and occasional triumphs) of Liz Callahan who’s finding that she could care less about being a “super-mom”- she just wants to survive. Mama Tried weaves Emily Flake’s darkly funny animation to help bring to life all of motherhood’s graphic, and sometimes gruesome, realness. Written by Emily Wilson (Cougar Town, Superior Donuts) and animated by and based on the graphic novel by Emily Flake, executive produced by Jax Media (Full Frontal, Broad City, Search Party).

Ms. Flake was a recent subject of the Spill’s “Checking In With…” series.  Read it here.

___________________________________________________________________________

Books of Interest: Seth, Ben Katchor

Never too early to think about upcoming books.  Both of these are University Press of Mississippi titles. Forging the Past: Seth and the Art of Memory –  (the paperback edition; the hardcover was published in 2016) — this edition comes out in December. Seth has been a New Yorker contributor since 2002. 

Ben Katchor: Conversations due in February of 2018. Mr. Katchor began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.

Link here to Seth’s Wikipedia entry.

Link here to Mr. Katchor’s website.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 7: Charles Saxon

A June 8, 1980 New York Times article, “The New Yorker’s Humor Merchants” lead off with this: Charles Saxon, a cartoonist for The New Yorker for the last 25 years, has a problem. So many companies have been buying his drawings for their ads that last year he was able to do only 15 cartoons for the magazine, half his usual total. “I was just swamped with ad assignments and my New Yorker work suffered,” he said.  “This year, I’m setting aside more time for the magazine which I consider my home home and where I can really express myself.”

It is true that, back then, ads using Saxon drawings seemed to be everywhere.  Here’s the very tip of the iceberg, courtesy of SPX’s Executive Director, Warren Bernard, who spent a  great deal of time and effort collecting ads featuring New Yorker cartoonists (and then allowed Ink Spill to reap the rewards).  Dates for ads: Polaroid, 1969; Chivas Regal,1981; Jacuzzi, 1979; IBM, 1963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Mr. Saxon’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Saxon (self portrait above left from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).