The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 18, 1984

As mentioned here last week, it’s double issue time again. We’re halfway though it now ; only a week til the new issue (dated June 18, 2018) appears online early Monday morning. Just for fun I thought I’d go back to another June 18th issue — the one from 1984. 

Here’s the cover, by Susan Davis, who contributed fifteen covers to the magazine from 1983 – 1992.

 

And here are the cartoonists in that issue:

A number of New Yorker cartoon gods in that lineup. And, as you might expect, some cartoonists  contributing to the magazine then who still contribute now. On the downside, a number of colleagues who’ve passed on: George Price, James Stevenson, William Steig, Stan Hunt, J. B. Handelsman, Steinberg, Bernie Schoenbaum, Frank Modell, Barney Tobey, Ed Arno, Mischa Richter, Ed Fisher, Eldon Dedini, and Robert Weber.

A quick tour through the issue: Ed Frascino has a very funny cartoon name-checking Indiana Jones; Lee Lorenz ( the art editor at the time) puts the word “glitz” to excellent use; a half page George Price cartoon centered on the Year of the Rat; a beautiful full page Saxon drawing about the Museum of Modern Art; a four part Stevenson spread across two pages. He animates television antenna; a titled Steig: “Eastbound Traffic.” Great drawing!;  Stan Hunt’s drawing is one of those cartoons that could’ve run anytime in the previous thirty years (previous to 1984, that is) — a boiler plate kind of cartoon; “Bud” Handelsman gives us a heaven-based piece; a Roz Chast drawing split into four boxes. It could’ve run this year; an Ed Koren drawing that just is so like butter — drawing and caption;  Steinberg provides an illustration for a Profile piece by E.J. Kahn, Jr.; opposite Steinberg is a Bernie Schoenbaum cocktail party drawing — a scenario employed by nearly every cartoonist back then; a Frank Modell drawing with his signature people — love his grumpy husband; an Arnie Levin caterpillar/butterfly drawing — that that loose Levin line is so great; a Barney Tobey drawing set in another favorite situation: the boardroom; a great Warren Miller drawing:

 Following Mr. Miller’s cartoon is an Ed Arno drawing — that fine controlled line of his! Immediately identifiable; a Mischa Richter dog at a desk drawing; Ed Fisher gives us a weather bureau drawing with lots of fun detail; Eldon Dedini’s cartoon of two guys at a bar with a caption that could run today:Everything’s a trap if you’re not careful.”;  next up, a cartoon that made me laugh out loud, by the great cartoonist, Robert Weber:

Next, a beautiful Sempe drawing (is there any other kind?); and last, a Sidney Harris restaurant drawing. Mr. Harris’s style is his and his alone: an angular line that appears to almost spin out of control, but never does.

So, there it is. A cartoon feast in mid-June, thirty-four years ago. 

 

     

Cartoonist Photos via Mike Lynch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a fun way to end the week: browsing through all 14 of the Cartoonist Photo links on  Mike Lynch’s blog.  Part 14 is up today, with links to the other 13 parts following the post. There are a small number of New Yorker cartoonists throughout — here are just three:  left to right: William Steig, Sid Harris, and Steinberg.

Gerberg at The New School Tonight; Another New Cartoonist at The New Yorker; An Early Sidney Harris Collection

A reminder that long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Mort Gerberg will be speaking at The New School this evening. All the details here.

Mr. Gerberg’s entry on Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Mort Gerberg Born, March 11, 1931, New York, NY.  NYer work: April 10, 1965 – .  Co-edited, with Ron Wolin & Ed Fisher,  The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons (Charles Scribner & Son, 1975).

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Earlier this month it was noted here that the work of two new cartoonists had been added to the magazine’s stable of cartoonists (Jeremy Nguyen and Alice Cheng). The number of new cartoonists added to The New Yorker’s stable of cartoonists  in 2017 is now  three.   The latest issue of the magazine, March 6, 2017 contains yet another new addition, Jim Benton.

Last year 16 new cartoonists were added (a record high). According to Ink Spill’s fairly reliable tally  of new cartoonists added since Bob Mankoff became cartoon editor in 1997 the total is now 128.  That number counts teams of cartoonists as one (sorry team members!).

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Following a discussion with a fellow cartoonist the other day about Sidney Harris’s cartoon collections, I went online to see if I could find a non-themed collection of his.  Mr. Harris has published a lot of  themed collections (his latest, 101 Funny Things About Global Warming is an anthology featuring his own work and the work of a number of his colleagues), but I could not recall what I think of as a standard collection, such as say Charles Addams’s Favorite Haunts.   In less than a few seconds the title shown here popped up. Pardon Me, Miss! was published by Dell in 1973 (his first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of July 9, 1973).  The title will be added to Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists Library.

 

Stuart Leeds: An Ink Spill Appreciation

Stuart Leeds photo 2002?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It recently came to the attention of Ink Spill that Stuart Leeds, a long-time New Yorker cartoonist, passed away several years ago, in his mid 70s.  This then is a very belated appreciation of Stuart’s contribution to the magazine and its community of artists.

Looking through his New Yorker work, beginning with his first drawing published April 27, 1981 (shown at the very bottom of this post) one sees a New York City-centric world, with a number of city sidewalk drawings (many depicting the awnings of swanky addresses such as the ones dotted along Park Avenue or 5th Avenue), and drawings focused on coffee (Manhattan’s unofficial drink). There are excursions into the old New Yorker cartoon stand-bys, relationships and business, and a few — too few — stops in childrens literature.  One of those (one of Stuart’s  two Alice in Wonderland-themed drawings) is, to my eyes, a classic.

 

Stuart was a Bronx native whose love of the New York Giants baseball team remained a preoccupation throughout his childhood and adult life (he was an active member of The New Yorker‘s softball team). He founded the New York (Baseball) Giants  Historical Society.  From City of Memory, a website funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, here’s what I believe is, in Stuart’s own words, a mini auto-biography addressing his love of the team:

Stuart Leeds was born in New York City on February 7th, 1939. His family, including his father Izzie and his grandfather lived in the Bronx and were avid New York Giants fans. Stuart went to his first game at the age of 5 — he remembers that it was threatening rain but it held off so he could watch. The Giants won! Stuart attended the last game in 1957 at the Polo Grounds, cheering, “Stay team, Stay!” Today, Stuart is part of  a community of fans who still cheer the San Francisco Giants and reminisce about the old days of the New York Giants. He pulled some grass from the grounds of the Polo Grounds and still keeps it in a jar at his home.

Other facts of Stuart’s life are fuzzier. We know he lived on 16th Street in  New York’s Chelsea neighborhood for years, and that he had a parrot named Harry.  A New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Sid Harris told me that Stuart once brought the parrot into the New Yorker‘s offices;  on another occasion, in what seemed like a page out of Thurber’s Pet Department, Stuart was quite distraught when the parrot began hanging upside down in its cage (Harry lived on). A New Yorker cartoonist, Nick Downes, told me that,  “You knew [Harry] accepted your presence when he let you scratch his head with a chopstick.”

Another New Yorker colleague, Sam Gross, told me Stuart spent many a  summertime on Fire Island, at first living in a home across from Sam, and in later years further away on the island.  Sam reminded me that Stuart had contributed spot drawings to the New Yorker. Here’s one from 1982:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We know also that Stuart taught humorous illustration at Cooper Union.  Here’s a piece on Stuart’s class that appeared in New York magazine back in 1994. It includes a memorable quote, “Humor is often about releasing anger in a socially acceptable way.”

Stuart Leeds Cooper Union piece 1994

 

 

Finally, and fittingly, in this video produced in 2009 we hear Stuart talk about New York, about art and about his attempts to sell his first drawing (below) to The New Yorker.

 

 

Interview: Bob Mankoff; “Every Tuesday Afternoon” to be Screened

 

Bob
From  History News Network, July 13, 2014, “A Life in Cartoons: An Interview with New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff”

 

 

 

 

 

And…

 

 

 

Rachel Loube’s short, Every Tuesday Afternoon, A Portrait of New Yorker Cartoonists, will be screened at the upcoming Rochester Jewish Film Festival.  The film focuses on several cartoonists, including Emily Flake, Zach Kanin, Drew Dernavich, Sidney Harris (below left) and Mort Gerberg (below right).

Details here.

Screen shot 2014-07-13 at 3.18.39 PMScreen shot 2014-07-13 at 3.06.28 PM

Edward Koren is Vermont’s new Cartoonist Laureate; Science & Sidney Harris

 

 

koren-2001_11_12From Vermont Public Radio, February 3, 2014, “Ed Koren To Be Vermont’s Next Cartoonist Laureate”

See some of Edward Koren’s New Yorker work here.

Visit Edward Koren’s website here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And…

 

 

 

 

HARRIS3

From Scienceline, January 31, 2014, “Science Cartoonist Sidney Harris doesn’t draw ‘funny style'”

And…

Link here to see Mr. Harris’s New Yorker work.