Article of Interest: “When Did New Yorker Covers Get So Thirsty?”; Fave Photo of the Day: Five New Yorker Cartoonists in Times Sq (2002)

From Slate, October 25, 2017, “When Did New Yorker Covers Get So Thirsty?”

— a piece by Matthew Dessem on the evolution of “specific people” New Yorker covers.

The first one, Nov 22, 1941, by Rea Irvin:

Top of the post, left: the second one: October 31, 1942 by Rea Irvin ; on the right, the most recent by Carter Goodrich.

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Fave Photo of the Day: Five New Yorker Cartoonists in Times Sq. (2002)

The photo, taken in Times Square, September 2002,  came to the Spill courtesy of Paul Wood, who lives and works across the pond. The cartoonists are from left to right: Sam Gross, Felipe Galindo (aka feggo), Paul Wood, John Kane, and Sid Harris. 

My thanks to Mr. Wood (an Ink Spill One Clubber: his drawing appeared in the New Yorker  January 24, 2000).

The Outer Boroughs’ New Yorker Cartoonists: An Ink Spill Map

Joining two previous Ink Spill maps, The New Yorker’s New York, and New Jersey’s New Yorkers, is the Outer Boroughs’ New Yorker Cartoonists. Cartoonists included were born in the boroughs.  I’m fairly certain this is not a complete picture — corrections and suggestions always welcome (for instance: please advise if Staten Island had at least one native born New Yorker cartoonist).

[Click on the map to enlarge it].

outer-boroughs-nyer-cartoonists-map

An Award for Loube’s “Every Tuesday Afternoon”

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From Oscars. org, “Academy Announces Medal Placement For 2013 Student Academy Awards” — Rachel Loube’s “Every Tuesday Afternoon” has been awarded a silver medal in the Documentary category. The film features assorted veteran New Yorker cartoonists as well as some freshman.

Here’s a link to the trailer.

Here’s a short piece about the awards from the LA Times.

Anda piece about the cartoonists lunch.

(in the photo above, on the left side of table, from bottom to top: Sam Gross (working on a plate of mussels), Mort Gerberg, David Borchart. On the right side of the table, from bottom to top, Sidney Harris, Emily Flake, and Liza Donnelly.

New film on New Yorker Cartoonists: “Very Semi-Serious”

We’ve known that Leah Wolchok has been hard at work on her film about New Yorker cartoonists and thought this was an excellent time to check in with her (Ink Spill will revisit Very Semi-Serious in a matter of weeks).  We asked Leah to describe her film, and give us an idea of who’s in it (so far). Here’s what she had to say:

 

Very Semi-Serious is an offbeat meditation on humor, art and the genius of the single panel.  The film takes an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at the 88-year old New Yorker and introduces the cartooning legends and hopefuls who create the iconic cartoons that have inspired, baffled—and occasionally pissed off—all of us for decades.

The film has been a labor of love and obsession for 6 ½ years. The film is supported by Tribeca Film Institute, IFP, the Pacific Pioneer Fund, Women Make Movies and BAVC. We are working closely with cartoon editor Bob Mankoff, and we’ve interviewed a dozen cartoonists, including Roz Chast, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly, Sam Gross, Mort Gerberg, Lee Lorenz, Matt Diffee, Drew Dernavich, Zach Kanin, Emily Flake, Liam Walsh and Liana Finck, who recently published her first cartoon in The New Yorker.  Next up is Bruce Eric Kaplan. 

We’ve also filmed scenes with Gahan Wilson, PC Vey, Sidney Harris, David Sipress, Mike Twohy, Joe Dator, Bob Eckstein, Robert Leighton, Farley Katz, Benjamin Schwartz, Carolita Johnson, Felippe Galindo, David Borchardt, Corey Pandolph, Paul Noth and Barbara Smaller.

Jack Ziegler and Andy Friedman both created original artwork for the film.

In a few weeks we are launching our website and trailer, featuring animation, interviews and never-before-seen footage from the New Yorker headquarters, cartoonists’ studios and inside the homes of caption contest devotees.  Plus a killer ping pong match between Bob Mankoff and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz.