The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of January 22, 2018

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

 I enjoy the little drama of seeing the new New Yorker cover pop up on the screen early Monday morning when I go to the digital issue; sometimes there is no Monday morning  drama because the cover has been released (online) days earlier. The magazine occasionally does this with of-the-moment covers. That’s the case this week — Anthony Russo‘s “In the Hole” appeared online days ago (I continue to wonder why New Yorker covers need titles, a practice that began with Tina Brown’s second issue, October 12, 1992). The last untitled New Yorker cover, issue of October 5, 1992  was Edward Sorel‘s punk in a hansom cab — the first Tina Brown era cover:

The very next issue, October 12, 1992:

This latest issue’s cartoons start off well with Bruce Kaplan‘s Alice in Wonderland drawing. It’s graphically more complex than his usual style. The caption is excellent. Way to go.

Next up, four pages later, is a Farley Katz concert drawing. I enjoyed hovering over this drawing, looking at the details, especially the drums and drummer. Just three pages later, a couple of texting turtles via Liana Finck. For some reason — I don’t believe I’ve ever thought or said this before about any cartoon (other than one of my own) — I really wanted this drawing to be ever-so-slightly colored-in. Perhaps the largeness of the landscape surrounding the turtles reminded me of how Guy Billout handles his pages.  

Six pages later, a fun Drew Dernavich drawing of a situation almost every driver has encountered: the hunt for a space. Coupled with a long-time favorite cartoonist scenario (the person crawling along the desert) and bingo!  My only wish here would have been for the cartoon to have more breathing room around it.  On the very next page, another drawing that would’ve benefited from a little bit more space on the page (hey what can I say, in the balancing act between text and cartoons, I always notice when there’s an imbalance). In Maddie Dai‘s cartoon we return to the Sistine Chapel (where Julia Suits was not too long ago). Reminder: if you haven’t seen the Michelangelo exhibit at the Met, better hurry.

Five pages later, a splendid Edward Koren drawing. And…it’s placed beautifully on the page.  You can’t ask or more, folks.

On the very next page, a history lesson from Sara Lautman:  how did the Great Lakes come to be called the Great Lakes.  Interesting drawing —  I like the scenario Ms. Lautman’s given us. 

Three pages later, a cold & flu season contribution from P.C. Vey.  The little drawing within the drawing is very funny. The aforementioned Julia Suits has the next drawing (on the very next page after Mr. Vey’s). The drawing makes use of the “what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas” armature. The setting is very George Boothian.  

On the opposite page a William Haefeli drawing drawing upon the Bob Newhart showism: “Don’t go to bed mad.” Words of wisdom then and now. On the next page, a Teresa Burns Parkhurst captionless drawing (and the second cold & flu drawing in the issue).  Elevator bank drawings are not seen all that often anymore. I like that the drawing was allowed to spread across three columns, allowing us to mosey on over to the pay-off.

Five pages later, Shannon Wheeler brings a very in-the-news item on home.  This could easily have been one of those drawings that are sometimes placed below the table of contents.  Good stuff. 

Six pages later, an Ed Steed scenario ( a category within itself). Dead (?) fish, in a cage, not a tank. The use of color offsets the mystery…just a little.

Eight pages later, courtesy of Mick Stevens, an advice-seeking court jester. Don’t know if this drawing has anything to do with current domestic politics (in particular, a current politician) but it feels like it does.  On the opposite page, a Mary Lawton “meet the…” scenario. “Meet the…” drawings seem to be making a comeback. This particular one seems true-to-life (with the exception of the two hours displayed on the sign.  I’ve a feeling you could meet those people during all business hours). 

Five pages later, the last drawing of the issue (not counting the caption contest cartoons).  Tom Toro‘s penchant for detail is put to great use. Funny drawing. I wish it wasn’t slammed up against an ad though. I don’t believe the balancing act mentioned earlier (with text and cartoons) should ever include advertisements and cartoons. Cartoons hugging editorial text: yea. Cartoons hugging ads: nay.  Just sayin’. 

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Update: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of The Town masthead still missing. This is what it looks like:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking Tour of Interest: Library of Congress’s “Drawn To Purpose”; Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler; Kovarsky Opening Reception at the Society of Illustrators, Friday, Jan. 12!

From Comics DC, January 9, 2018, “Touring the LoC’s Drawn  to Purpose exhibit with curator Martha Kennedy” — an interesting walk through with Mike Rhode. Among the New Yorker contributors mentioned: Barbara Shermund, Roberta MacDonald, Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Helen Hokinson, and Alice Harvey. Read it here.

Link to the Library of Congress’s page here.

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Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler

From Bleeding Cool. January 9, 2018, “Shannon Wheeler’s Exhibition of Trump Cartoons, Across From Mar-A-Lago

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A Reminder: The Opening Reception for the Society of Illustrator’s exhibit “Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker” is this Friday, January 12thDetails here.  

More Unseen Kovarsky: Mike Lynch has posted a number of previously unpublished work by Mr. Kovarsky.  See it here!

 

 

Podcast of Interest: Gil Roth Interviews Shannon Wheeler; Fave Photo: Liza Donnelly In the New York Yankees Dugout with Shortstop, Didi Gregorius; R.C. Harvey’s Out-of-the-Vault Interview with Playboy’s Former Cartoon Editor, Michelle Urry; Radio Interview: Roz Chast

Podcast of Interest: Gil Roth Interviews Shannon Wheeler

Gil Roth continues his wonderful series of cartoonist interviews with Too Much Coffee Man’s Shannon Wheeler.  Hear it here.

— thanks to Attempted Bloggerys Stephen Nadler for bringing this to my attention (check out his site for recent posts on two auction pieces: an Arnold Roth drawing and  a Charles Addams pencil sketch)

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Fave Photo: Liza Donnelly in the New York Yankees dugout with Didi Gregorius

Liza Donnelly recently spent the afternoon at Yankee Stadium.  Among the highlights of the day: lending her iPad to the team’s shortstop, Didi Gregorius, for his first tablet drawing. See the short CBS video here

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R.C. Harvey’s From-the-Vault Interview with the late Michelle Urry, Playboy’s Former Cartoon Editor

From TCJ, May 4, 2017,  “Magazine Gag Cartoons, Michelle Urry, and Cartooning for Playboy” — an enlightening interview with Ms. Urry, who passed away in October of 2006.

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Roz Chast on Fresh Air

The media blitz is on for Ms. Chast’s just-out Going Into Town Here she is on NPR”s Fresh Air, aired October 2nd(find it just just below the Tom Petty piece).

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 19: Look Magazine Miscellany; Wheeler, Sikoryak, and Trump; Pond and Carre in Columbus

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 19: Look Magazine Miscellany

Courtesy of ComicsDC’s Mike Rhode, here’s a quartet of ads from Look magazine. The Otto Soglow Pepsi ad, the Richard Taylor Pepsodent ad and the The Richard Decker cops & robber ad are all from the issue of February 23, 1943. The Richard Decker stocking full of smokes ad is from the issue of December 15, 1942.

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Wheeler, Sikoryak, and Trump

From Forbes.com, September 16, 2017, ” In The Age of Trump, Cartoonists Get Graphic With The Critiques” — this piece on Trumpian books by two New Yorker contributors, Shannon Wheeler and Robert Sikoryak.

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Pond and Carre in Columbus

Mimi Pond and Lilli Carre are among the Special Guests at the upcoming Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (Sept. 28 – Oct. 1).  Details here.

Cuneo’s Klam Drawings; Sikoryak Illustrates Trumpisms; Finck Covers Closet and a Novel

Cuneo’s Klam Drawings

What fun! New Yorker cover artist and illustrator, John Cuneo, has supplied illustrations for Matthew Klam’s latest book, Who Is Rich?: A Novel ;  what’s fun, besides Mr. Cuneo’s work — called “…darkly humorous…” in The Washington Post’s  review of the book — is that the novel’s main character is a…cartoonist.

 

 

 

 

Here’s how the novel is described, in part, by the publisher: 

Every summer, a once-sort-of-famous cartoonist named Rich Fischer leaves his wife and two kids behind to teach a class at a week-long arts conference in a charming New England beachside town. It’s a place where, every year, students—nature poets and driftwood sculptors, widowed seniors, teenagers away from home for the first time—show up to study with an esteemed faculty made up of prizewinning playwrights, actors, and historians; drunkards and perverts; members of the cultural elite; unknown nobodies, midlist somebodies, and legitimate stars—a place where drum circles happen on the beach at midnight, clothing optional.

Above: drawings by John Cuneo from Who Is Rich?    Link here to Mr. Cuneo’s website.

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  • Sikoryak Illustrates Trumpisms

Robert Sikoryak’s The Unquotable Trump  (Drawn& Quarterly) was unveiled at Comic Con Diego.  This is the third Trump-related title from a New Yorker contributor (Tom Toro’s Tiny Hands and Shannon Wheeler’s Sh*t My President Says are the other two).

Read about the CBR’s article on Mr. Sikoryak here.

 

 

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Finck Covers Closet

This interesting piece by Ms. Finck in The New York Review of Books

…and more Finck: this interview from Bedford +Bowery

left: one of Ms. Finck’s drawings from the NYR

 

…lastly, leaving off where this day’s post began, it has been brought to the Spill‘s attention that Ms. Finck is the cover artist behind Matthew Klam’s aforementioned novel.