Seth Returns to The Virtual Memories Show; A Tune Jokes Cover; Now That’s What I Call Marketing…

New Yorker cover artist, Seth (Gregory Gallant) returns to Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast.  Hear it here.  And while you’re there check out Mr. Roth’s  archive of interviews with other cartoonists, including, among others, these New Yorker contributors: Edward Koren, Roz Chast, Sam Gross, Liza Donnelly, R.O. Blechman, Peter Kuper, and John Cuneo.  

 

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We have not heard the last of the cartoonist, Buford Tune (mentioned here yesterday).  To the left is a snippet of a Tune cover that has surfaced courtesy of Columbia University’s Karen Green.  See the entire cover over at Attempted Bloggery.

 

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Here, by way of Danny Shanahan, who donates most generously to the Spill‘s archives, is a box of  Le Pen markers with an understated New Yorker connection.

 

 

 

Small Press Expo (SPX 2013) this weekend

SPX2013poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happening this very moment: The Small Press Expo 2013 (the poster is by by New Yorker contributor, Seth). Below, a couple of pieces about it:

From The Washington Post’s “Comic Riffs” column by Michael Cavna, September 14, 2013,   SPX 2013: From Carre to DeForge: Here they are, your Ignatz Award nominees

From Washington City Paper, September 14, 2013,  “Small Press Expo at Bethesda North Marriott”

Addams Family Collaboration; Steinberg biography one of the NYTs 100 Notable Books of 2012; Interview: Mick Stevens; Toronto Group Photo

 

From the blog, Little Gothic Horrors, November 30, 2012,“An Addams Family Collaboration”

 

 

Deidre Bair’s Saul Steinberg: A Biography (Nan A.Talese/Doubleday) has been named one of The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2012.

 

 

From nudistnaturistamerica, November 29, 2012, “Naked Cartoons and Censorship”, Mick Stevens revisits his dots in this interview.

 

From boingboing, November 29, 2012, “Cartoonist Group Photo in Toronto Restaurant” — this fun photo includes, among others,  Seth, Charles Burns, Adrian Tomine, and Chris Ware (whose Building Stories was just named one of the year’s 10 Best Books of 2012 by The New York Times).

 

 

 

Two reports: University of Chicago Comics Conference & Maine Comics Arts Festival

From The Beat, May 21, 2012 “Comics G-17 summit report from Chicago” (content includes references to: Robert Crumb, Chris Ware, Francoise Mouly, Daniel Clowes, Seth, Art Spiegelman, Aline Kominsky-Crumb and Ivan Brunetti, among others)

 

From mikelynchcartoons.blogspot, May 21, 2012, “Report: Maine Comics Arts Festival May 20, 2012” (content includes references to John Klossner, Kate Beaton, and Bill Woodman)


 

It’s Not All About New Yorker Cartoons…But Mostly It Is

 

 

 

It makes sense that the shelves of the cartoon library of two New Yorker cartoonists would be sagging under the weight of New Yorker cartoon collections. But a  large fragment of what makes up our cartoon library has little to do with New Yorker cartoons and a lot to do with work that initially inspired us, and with newer work that continues to inspire.

 

Pictured above is a condensed collection — a mini-library — of non-New Yorker books that I keep near my office (my wife has her own mini-library in her office). There’re a lot of books devoted to Superman and Batman, and that’s exactly how it should be.  Those were my earliest influences along with a few Sunday Funnies, such as Blondie and Dick Tracy.  And then, of course, there was Mad (I’m especially fond of Mad Cover To Cover).

 

The two Smithsonian collections pictured (Comic-Book Comics and Newspaper Comics) are essential cartoon library books.  The R. Crumb books are there because his work acted as bridge  connecting the years I devoted to comic books with my earliest days of discovering New Yorker cartoonists (Crumb himself began contributing to The New Yorker in the 1990s and then stopped contributing due to…well, let’s leave that for another post).

There’re a number of books devoted to graphic novels.  I had the graphic novel fever for a while.   The Marx Brothers Scrapbook in the photo sits next to Monty Python Speaks!   Neither are cartoon collections, but it’s fitting that they are represented.  Their work was and is as graphically inspiring as any of the others on the shelves.

A handful of  New Yorker contributors books are part of this mini-library (Crumb, for instance, as well as Edward Sorel, Ward Sutton, Daniel Clowes,  and Seth), but these books are from their other fields of interest.

The eagle-eyed will spot an actual New Yorker collection.  It makes no sense that it’s there and I can only think it has to do with its origin —  it’s a French collection.