Just Opened! Library of Congress Exhibit “Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 24: Otto Soglow’s Pudding Drawings; More Spills: Weyant and Twohy

Library of Congress Exhibit: Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists

From the LOC’s press release:

Original works by women cartoonists and illustrators are featured in a new exhibition opening at the Library of Congress on Nov. 18. Spanning the late 1800s to the present, “Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists” brings to light remarkable but little-known contributions made by North American women to these art forms.

Among the artists represented are New Yorker contributors Roberta MacDonald, Helen Hokinson, Liza Donnelly, Peggy Bacon, Roz Chast, and Anita Kunz.

Details here.

Above: March 1920 Vanity Fair cover by Anne Harriet Fish.

________________________________________________________________________

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 24: Otto Soglow’s Pudding Drawings.

Here are three Royal Pudding ads by the great Otto Soglow.  All feature his iconic “Little King”;  for those wanting more Soglow I suggest finding a copy of the fab Cartoon Monarch: Otto Soglow & The Little King,  edited by Dean Mullaney (IDW, 2012). I’ve shown the cover below the ads.

All these pudding ads ran in 1955.  As has been the case with a very large percentage of the Spill’New Yorker ads series, my thanks go to Warren Bernard for his generosity.

_________________________________________________________________________

Two books of note.  One out in January and one not out for awhile. Both for kids.

Christopher Weyant has illustrated Laura Gehl’s My Pillow Keeps Moving (Viking Books for Young Readers).  Due in mid January 2018.

Mike Twohy‘s Stop! Go! Yes, No!: A Story of Opposites (Balzer & Bray) due in August of 2018.   Cover art not yet available

 

 

 

A Spill Spotlight: Roberta MacDonald

R.MacDonald

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The entry for Roberta MacDonald on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” has been woefully thin… until now. Thanks to her daughter’s contribution to this site  we now have a photograph of Ms. MacDonald as well as more biographical information and samples of her book illustrations.

Ms. MacDonald contributed  a hundred and three drawings to The New Yorker from 1940 to 1952.  Both her first drawing, in the issue of May 4, 1940 and her last, in the issue of July 19, 1952, were captionless and multi-panel — a MacDonald specialty. Of her hundred and three drawings I’d estimate a good three-quarters were multi-panel (some only a few panels and others stretching across several pages).  I’ve always felt that these kinds of drawings were the most difficult to do. Ms. MacDonald’s drawings had an easy line, with a seemingly effortless ability to capture whatever scene she’d set her sights on (below: a drawing from The New Yorker, April 8, 1950)

 

MacDonald April 8 1950

Liza Donnelly, in her Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and their Cartoons, had this to say about Ms. MacDonald:

her first cartoon was politically minded…it reflects MacDonald’s sensitivity to politics and the then mood of the country, a talent she demonstrated throughout her early work for The New Yorker.

MacDonald.Self

Born in San Francisco in 1917, Ms. MacDonald attended the  University of California Berkeley where she was a contributor and editor for Pelican, their humor magazine. She moved to New York after selling some cartoons to The New Yorker. Besides contributing cartoons to other magazines  she illustrated numerous humor and children’s books until returning to California in the 1960’s. Ms. MacDonald  died in Santa Rosa, California, 1999. [left:  a self portrait from Meet The Artist, a 1943  exhibition catalog from the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum  in San Francisco]

 

Below are some examples of Ms. MacDonald’s book illustrations (Translations From the English, 1951 & a page from the book; The Abe Burrows Songbook, 1955; The Adventures of Pinocchio, 1960)

Translations

Translations from The Children Abe BurrowsPinocchio Abridged

 

From the Ink Spill Archives: A Wartime New Yorker Pamphlet

ex. 1345

 

 

 

Back in late May I posted interesting cover art from Rea Irvin.  Today, another item from the bundle of donated materials, Excerpts From The New Yorker. As explained inside the front cover:

ex 2347

 

This 27 page pamphlet contains drawings by Alain (on the cover as well as inside), Peter Arno, Robert Day, George Price, Richard Decker, Charles Addams, Roberta MacDonald, Gluyas Williams, Frank Beaven, Alan Dunn, and Barbara Shermund.

As a bonus, this particular copy features an “R” in bold red on the cover.  Art approved for publication by Harold Ross (The New Yorker‘s founder, and editor from 1925 through 1951) would bear his initial.

A blast from the past: Meet the Artist

 

In 1943,  San Francisco’s M.H. De Young Memorial Museum held an exhibit of artist’s self portraits called “Meet the Artist.”  The catalog, 8 1/2″ x 7 3/4″ is a gem.  Of the 188 artists represented, a number are New Yorker contributors: James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Otto Soglow, Mischa Richter, Richard Taylor, Alajalov, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Richard Decker, Roberta MacDonald, Barbara Shermund, Reginald Marsh, Dorothy McKay, Garrett Price,  Gluyas Williams, and Rea Irvin.  Self portraits shown above, top to bottom: Garrett Price’s self portrait on the catalog’s cover, Richard Taylor and Mischa Richter.

Note: this catalog can be found online; numerous copies at varying prices are available on AbeBooks.com.