The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 4 & 11, 2018

The Fiction/Childhood Issue? Well that’s what it says, in red and black on the Table of Contents:

First, the paperwork:

See that beautiful masthead just above?  It was drawn and designed by Rea Irvin.  It’s been missing since Spring of last year after appearing in the New Yorker for 92 years. It was replaced last year by a redrawn version (redrawn by Christoph Niemann). Here’s hoping that one day Mr. Irvin’s work will be returned and replace the replacement. If  you wish to read more on the original and the replacement and see their elements compared side-by-side, link here.

From the Dept. of Just Sayin’

There are 22 Illustrations in this week’s issue (that includes photographs, but does not include Tom Bachtell’s wonderful drawings appearing in the Talk of The Town, nor does it include the Spot drawings appearing throughout the issue).  6 of the illustrations are full page.  There are 14 cartoons (none full page).

And now to the issue’s cartoons. Here are the cartoonists whose work appears this week:

As is becoming customary, I’m going to mention just a few cartoons instead of looking at each in the issue. The first, by Robert Leighton, is a particular favorite. I won’t show it, but you can see it here among all the others just published  (just scroll down to the heading “Cartoons from the Issue”). Mr. Leighton, whose classic Escher drawing was profiled here awhile back, has given us a charming and delightful drawing somewhat reminiscent of Frank Modell‘s work with a bit of Nurit Karlin tossed in (I’d link you to Ms. Karlin’s fabulous work, but sad to say that the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site does not seem to have archived it).

Mr. Leighton’s drawing deserves a hearty round of applause.

It was just last week that a co-credited drawing (Kaamran Hafeez and Al Batt) was mentioned here as being somewhat rare, and now the very next week is another co-credited cartoon. This time it’s a drawing by Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell and Ellis Rosen. Suddenly co-credits are not so rare.

As usual, for those who want a critical take on all the cartoons, I’m pointing you to Cartoon Companion.  The site usually posts on Thursdays or Fridays.

Note:  The Monday Tilley Watch will return in two weeks as this current issue is a double.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of May 28, 2018

Gayle Kabaker‘s charming cover kicks off summertime ’18 (you can read about the cover here).

Just for fun I’m showing the cover of every last issue of May from 1925 through 2015, one from each decade.

May 30, 1925: Ilonka Karasz; May 25, 1935: Constantin Alajalov; May 26, 1945: Constantin Alajalov; May 28, 1955: A. Birnbaum; May 29, 1965: Arthur Getz; May 26, 1975: Robert Tallon; May 27, 1985: Gretchen Dow Simpson; May 29, 1995: Mark Ulriksen; May 30, 2005: Peter de Seve; May 25, 2015: Carter Goodrich

And now to the new issue.

From the Department of Just Sayin’ : There are 18 cartoons and 17 illustrations (3 of the illustrations are full page)…  Rea Irvin’s classic  Talk of The Town Masthead is still a-missin’. It’s a thing of beauty. This is what it looks like:

I’m going to mention just one drawing from this issue (if you want critical writing on the cartoons I suggest you head over to Cartoon Companion, where each drawing is discussed and rated from 1 – 6).  Charlie Hankin’s drawing (it’s on page 61) reminded me of Jack Ziegler’s work. That of course is a very good thing. Mr. Hankin gives us a lovely (and large) drawing of the Metropolitan Opera House —  obviously there’s more to it than that; you can see it here, along with all the other drawings in the issue.  Mr. Ziegler’s was a cartoon world created to amuse himself; his way-out-there graphic and humorous takes on just about everything were his cartoon calling card. It’s good to see someone (Mr. Hankin in this case) give us such a fun drawing to look at and live with.

Finally, some paperwork.  A new cartoonist in this issue:  Jessica Olien.   If my record keeping is correct, Ms. Olien is the 15th new cartoonist — the 4th this year — brought on board since Emma Allen took charge of the magazine’s Cartoon Department in May of 2017.

Here’s the list of cartoonists in this week’s issue:

You might notice a co-credited cartoon: Kaamaran Hafeez and Al Batt.  It’s not the first time a cartoonist has shared credit with a gagwriter, but it’s still a rarity. 

— See you next week

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of May 21, 2018

It’s always a great pleasure to see one of John Cuneos covers on the magazine. His restless pen never fails to amuse and amaze.  Read what Mr. Cuneo had to say about his swampy cover on this week’s issue.

The Tilley Tweak Watch:   Is it my imagination or is this a first: the Talk of the Town masthead (that would be the year old new masthead, not Rea Irvin’s classic masthead) appears on the left side of the magazine’s gutter instead of the right side.  If someone can point to an earlier issue sporting it on the left side please contact me. 

Below: The masthead in its usual place, on the right side.

 Below:  this week’s masthead on the left side.

And just for fun, here’s a blast from the past: the Talk masthead from May 24, 1947 featuring Rea Irvin’s classic design:

Speaking of design, here’s a little quiz: without first looking at this week’s issue which one of the photos below do you think is the actual photograph appearing on the lead page of Goings On About Town? The other two belong to ads. (*The answer is below)

And now (finally!) on to two cartoons in the issue that really struck me. I’m a big fan of seeing things I’ve never seen before. It’s a difficult thing to do in cartoonville. Mick Stevens’ drawing leads off the issue with a wonderful drawing. We don’t see many rut drawings. I’d say the same for the second drawing in the issue, courtesy of Ed Steed.  Applause for both drawings:

For the record, here are the cartoonists appearing in this issue:

Also for the record: this issue contains sixteen cartoons and nineteen illustrations. The illustrations (including photographs) are given five full pages (including the GOAT photo, which, for those wondering is… * the middle photo above).

— see you next week

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini; The Monday Tilley Watch

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini

Out of the blue, the Monterey Herald posted this fine photo of the late Eldon Dedini under the headline, “Looking Back, Portrait of a Cartoonist”

Here’s Mr. Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. New Yorker work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

And a real treat, mentioned here a long time back: there’s a multi-panel documentary of Mr. Dedini available onYouTubePart 1 here

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The Monday Tilley Watch

The issue of May 14, 2018, The “Innovators Issue”…

Record keeping: here’re the cartoonists in the issue (Liana Finck’s name isn’t below but she is listed on the Table of Contents for a Sketchbook piece titled “Life and Work”).

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead (below) is still in storage.  As the president might say: Sad!

And sorry to bring this up again, but this business of switching from the Irvin typeface on bylines (see below: “By Tad Friend”) strikes me as tweaking something that does not need tweaking. In fact, some newly incorporated design elements need to be un-tweaked. Would you tweak the top of the Empire State Building because you could? I hope not.

 

Below is a heading plucked from the Dec. 3, 2012 issue.  Notice Calvin Trillin’s name set in Irvin type. Now look back up at the byline for Superior Intelligence.  No question which is the superior typeface. 

Ok, back to cartoons, briefly.  If you want a close look at each cartoon in the issue please visit the Cartoon Companion.  They usually post their rated takes for the latest issue at the end of the week. The CC and the Spill are not affiliated, and in fact often disagree on what’s a great cartoon and what’s a dud.  I’ll return to looking closely at cartoons in this space every so often. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of May 7, 2018

A Sempe cover! And a bonus: a lengthier Cover Story than of late, with several photos (including one of Sempe and Ed Koren astride bicycles in NYC). Nice. Very nice.

On a run through this new issue the number of illustrations and photos seemed even weightier than the past few issues (and that’s really saying something). It’s likely due to Zadie Smith’s profile of photographer, Deana Lawson.  As the profile is of a photographer, using photographs makes sense.  Although, Brendan Gill’s New Yorker profile of the pioneer of celebrity photography, Jerome Zerbe included no photographs. Ah, but that was then (1973), this is forty-five years later.  Three cartoons (from William O’Brian, Stan Hunt and  Dean Vietor) and a hand drawn illustration by Silverman of Mr. Zerbe did appear within the pages of Mr. Gill’s piece. In true New Yorker tradition, the cartoons were unrelated to the content of the Zerbe profile.

A casual run-down of illustrations/photographs in this latest issue:

The usual close to full page photo on the Goings On About Town lead page.

3 full page illustrations

10 illustrations of various sizes.

Nearly 8 pages of photographs within the Lawson Profile 

Looking at that 1973 issue (June 9, 1973 to be exact) I was blown away by the number of cartoons it contained and the space they were allowed on the page. The only illustration was Mr. Silverman’s portrait of Mr. Zerbe (we’re not counting the “spot” drawings which are in a category unto them seIves). In other words: cartoons ruled. 

Below is a screen shot of pages 27-33 from that 1973 issue. Six cartoons in seven pages (cartoons by Warren Miller, Frank Modell, James Stevenson, George Price, William Hamilton, and Mischa Richter).

Two pages following Mr. Richter’s cartoon, this beauty by John Norment:

On the very next page following Mr. Norment’s drawing, this terrific multi-panel drawing by George Booth:

Following Mr. Booth’s piece are nine more cartoons by these cartoonists: Henry Martin, the aforementioned drawings by William O’Brian, Stan Hunt and Dean Vietor; Charles Barsotti, Robert Weber, Ton Smits, James Stevenson’s second in the issue, and Warren Miller’s second in the issue. Each is allowed generous space on the page. Oh, and Charles Saxon did the cover!

For a look at every cartoon in this latest issue I direct your attention to the Cartoon Companion blog. The bloggers “Max” and “Simon” (not their real names) go drawing by drawing, rating each along the way.  Look for the post covering this new issue either late this coming Thursday or Friday. I’m not always in agreement with the CC guys’ ratings, but anytime anyone is talking about New Yorker cartoons, I try my best to pay attention. 

ps: One year later, and Rea Irvin’s classic masthead still is a-missing. 

This is what it looks like:

 

 

 

Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of April 23 2018

This week’s cover by David Hockney, artiste! 

First order of business: for those hoping that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead would suddenly pop up for Spring: alas, such is not the case. Here’s what it looks like, lest we forget:

And below is the barely one year old re-do. Irvin’s classic wins by a knock-out.

Last week in this space it was mentioned that illustration in that week’s issue seemed to be everywhere. This week is the same, but more so. I count 20 illustrations/photographs, including a double-page spread as well as two full pages. You might wonder why this is even mentioned. I trace it back to (some) cartoonists’ sensitivity surrounding the arrival of New York magazine.  It made liberal use of illustration and photography —  a model that spawned a flotilla of like-designed publications. There was not a cartoon in sight.

It’s interesting watching the Monday Tilley Watch trying to find its footing.  It began lightheartedly as a breezy look through each new issue, commenting on the cartoons (but not criticizing them). I’ve found, as each new issue presents itself, that there are sometimes cartoons that don’t work (for me) or that escape me (which actually is the same as not working for me). But what’s always been the most fun is coming across a cartoon that is so good its energy comes off the page or screen. I came across two in this current issue: Liana Finck’s and Bruce Eric Kaplan’s. Ms. Finck’s drawing of a sun going off to work is in Steig territory.  Mr. Kaplan’s drawing is slice of life from the school of classic New Yorker cartoons. Very good solid work.

 — See you next week