New Yorker Scrapbooks; Last College Humor Arnos From Attempted Bloggery



NYer Scrapbook 1931









Back in 1931 The New Yorker published something called The New Yorker Scrapbook; unfortunately it contained zero cartoons, spots, covers, or illustrations. It’s a collection of writing from the then six year old magazine.


Over the years I’ve come across (either bought, or received as a gift) a number of scrapbooks containing clipped New Yorker art. In some cases they weren’t technically scrapbooks as the art wasn’t glued or pasted in a book, but stuffed in a manila folder. Those loose drawings are fun to look at,  but you need to dump them out like Pick up Stix before wading through (I won’t show those here). Below are a few more orderly examples from Ink Spill’s archives.


The first scrapbooks I ever encountered were in a small used bookstore (The Book Cave?) in Woodstock, New York. Two volumes of New Yorker covers, each a three ring binder such as a student would have in high school.  Someone had (unfortunately) used reinforcement hole protectors on every cover in the earlier binder.  The earliest cover, seen on the left, is dated November 24, 1928 (artist: Julian de Miskey) —  that’s a Helen Hokinson  cover on the right. The last cover in the binder, barely visible in the photo (it’s the pink cover peeking out from the bottom) was the last cover of the 1930s (artist: Charles Addams).

NYer Covers Scrapbook #1






The second volume, spared the hole reinforcements,  picked up in the 1940s.  Scrapbook #2Shown here: Rea Irvin‘s terrific cover of July 15, 1944 commemorating D-Day.


A more recent arrival to the Ink Spill archives (courtesy of a relative) is  dated 1939-1940. The scrapbook contains carefully arranged New Yorker spot drawings.  Though the pages are brittle the cover has  aged well as have the spots:

NYer Spots Scrapbook #1NYer Spots Scrapbook #2











IMG_0430Attempted Bloggery finishes up its week-long look at some of Peter Arno‘s work for College Humor. Kudos to Stephen Nadler for the great detective work resulting in this fine series.

The New Yorker’s 91st Anniversary Issue

NYer ann





















On the newsstands this week and next (because it’s a double issue): The New Yorker Anniversary issue (yes, it’s called that on the Table of Contents).


Eustace Tilley, as you can see by the cover, has returned, albeit not Rea Irvin’s original.


Small ChangeS Noted:

At the bottom of the Table of Contents, the typeface used for the Drawings (meaning cartoons) has returned to this font…

font back


…after a brief flirtation with the font below  as part of the magazine’s re-design of certain sections (Goings On About Town, etc.):



ALSO: Was happy to see the (refined*) Rea Irvin typeface has returned to the following headings: Goings On About Town, Classical Music, Art, Night Life, Movies, The Theatre, and Above & Beyond.  (oddly, Food & Drink is still hanging in there with interlocking “oo”s — a use that goes back to the version of the font in the earliest issues).

*refined meaning that the Irvin typeface was once less perfect along its edges than it is today.  Examples:old Irvin




Irvin new

Drew Dernavich’s First Children’s Book


With the publication this coming February of It’s Not Easy Being Number 3, Drew Dernavich continues the long tradition of New Yorker cartoonists venturing into the children’s book world (the list includes, among many others,  Rea Irvin, Lee Lorenz, James Stevenson, Robert Kraus, James Thurber, William Steig, Frank Modell, Ed Arno, Edward Koren, Henry Martin, Syd Hoff, Dana Fradon, Jack Ziegler, Liza Donnelly, Danny Shanahan, Harry Bliss, and Roz Chast).

[It’s Not Easy Being Number 3, Henry Holt/Christy Ottaviano, February 2016]

More info:

Mr. Dernavich’s website

Finck’s Trio on The Toast; Attempted Bloggery’s Close Look at the 3rd New Yorker; Farley Katz on Pencils

LFCan’t get enough of Liana Finck’s wonderful drawings? Well now you can see three at once on The Toast.

Ms. Finck’s website



Attempted Bloggery continues its close look at The New Yorker’s earliest issues. Today it’s issue #3

(left: a glimpse of Rea Irvin’s cover for the third issue)





FKA Case For Pencils continues its look at the tools of the trade with Farley Katz — the 10th New Yorker cartoonist in the series.

Mr. Katz’s website


The New Yorker Celebrates its 90th

Eustace Tilley's Fanned Out.

Over on The New Yorker’s website there is much to dig into: cartoon slide shows from various decades, selected classic pieces, covers.   Go here to see what’s going on.


Note: Alas, Rea Irvin’s classic cover of the magazine’s mascot does not appear this week. Nine contemporary takes on Tilley appear instead. I took the above photo to accompany my essay “Tilley Over Time” on the magazine’s website, August of 2008.

Auction of Interest: Swann Offers Numerous New Yorker Cartoons; Covers Calendar Noted; Video: Mankoff on Science of Humor

SwannSwann’s upcoming auction on January 22nd is chock full of New Yorker cartoons, with work by a number of the magazine’s giants.

Cartoons on the block by Steinberg, Mischa Richter, Barbara Shermund, William Steig, Richard Taylor, Edward Sorel, Victoria Roberts, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson, Rea Irvin, and Peter Arno.

Below: a beautiful early Steig included in the auction.


Link here to see all the work and for all the auction info.



Covers Cal

Ordinarily, New Yorker cartoon calendars, diaries, and the like aren’t listed here, but this sounds like it’s not your ordinary calendar, so I’m making an exception.

Here’s an excerpt from the publisher’s blurb for The New Yorker 365 Days of Covers Page-A-Day Gallery Calendar 2016:

“…this calendar features hundreds of the very best examples, all beautifully reproduced in full color. Here are iconic covers from Jean-Jacques Sempé, George Booth, Maira Kalman, Arthur Getz, Roz Chast, and the other illustrators whose work has helped shape The New Yorker’s inimitable style. Unprecedented quality with its exceptional art, coated paper, and exacting standards of color printing, this calendar is a gallery for your desk.”




From Business Insider, December 31, 2014, this short video featuring The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff: “Scientists Discovered What Makes Something Funny”