The Tilley Watch Online, June 25-29, 2018; On Attempted Bloggery: More Getz

The Daily Cartoon was all Trump all the time this week (whether directly or indirectly).  The contributing cartoonists: Pia Guerra, Michael Shaw, Brendan Loper, Pat Byrnes, and Bob Eckstein

Over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists included Liana Finck, Emily Flake, and Tim Hamilton.

You can see all the work above and more by going here.

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More Getz

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery zeroes in on some more work by the late great New Yorker cover artist, Arthur Getz.  Read it all here!

The Wednesday Tilley Watch: Chast, Eckstein at the NYC Book Expo; A Sketchy Interview w/ John Donohue; Liza Donnelly’s Drawings Shown in Belgium; Pia Guerra’s New Book

Chast, Eckstein at Book Expo

The big Book Expo is on at the Javits Center in Manhattan. Roz Chast will be signing as well as Bob Eckstein (he’s appearing tomorrow, 11am to 2pm at booth 1827…National Book Network). Here’s a link to all the Book Expo info

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978; Mr. Eckstein in 2007.

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Gothamist’s Sketchy Interview with John Donohue

The Gothamist continues its Sketchy Interview series with John Donohue. Mr. Donohue, formerly a staffer at the New Yorker, contributed his first cartoon to the magazine in 2004. Read/see the interview here.

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Liza Donnelly’s Work Exhibited in Belgium

As part of the international festival of cartoon and press drawing in Bastogne, the Bastogne War Museum hosted 2 popular cartoonists :

Pierre Ballouhey Dessins/Humour/Presse, pro cartoonist for 40 years, president of France-Cartoons, agreed to draw for some of our lucky visitors;

Liza Donnelly, American cartoonist, works for many publishers (The New Yorker, CBS…) Coming back to Bastogne was an appealing moment : her uncle served during the Battle of the Bulge.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.

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Pia Guerra’s New Book

From Smash Pages, “Me The People” Collects Pia Guerra’s Political Cartoons” — this piece on Ms. Guerra’s book, due in October. Ms. Guerra began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

— thanks to Mike Rhode of ComicsDC for sending this along.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Promo of Interest: Lars Kenseth’s Chuck Deuce

Another cycle of news cycles, another week’s worth of Daily cartoons. This week’s work brought to you by Danny Shanahan, Jeremy Nguyen, Pia Guerra, Avi Steinberg, and Kim Warp.

And over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Jason Adam Katzenstein, Olivia de Recat, and Tom Chitty.

— All of the above work, and more, can be found here!

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Follow-up: Lars Kenseth’s Pilot

Here’s a promo from Adult Swim wherein you’ll find a snippet from Lars Kenseth’s Chuck Deuce.

Link to Mr. Kenseth’s website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of April 30, 2018

Baseball in the air, on the field and on the cover of the latest issue of The New Yorker (actually, stickball’s on the cover, which appears, to me anyway, as if it’s a page out of an illustrated book).

Fewer illustrations/photos this week than last, but still, there are three full pages (including a full page photo of Hitler), and close to full page photo on the Goings On About Town lead page. How I wish we could see cartoons occupy a larger space every so often. Below are two pages from the issue of November 15, 1930. You can see how the drawings dominate the page and how the type follows the drawing. For instance: in the drawing on the left, by the great Barbara Shermund, the hanging plant is allowed to push up and compress the column of text. Notice too how the space afforded her beautiful drawing allows us to get far more visually involved in her work than if it had been squished in a rectangle.   

And now on to the issue’s cartoons.  A fun issue, mostly.

  It starts off well with a Danny Shanahan politically tinged(?) monkey drawing. Going out on a limb here, but Mr. Shanahan’s fabulous monkeys are the obvious heirs to Charles Addams’ takes on our ancestors.

Next up, three pages later, Jason Adam Katzenstein (aka JAK) goes to where many-a-cartoonist before him has gone: to the myth of Sisyphus. After I sped through an online refresher course about the King’s uphill struggle, I realized how this scenario beloved by cartoonists has oftimes become untethered from its backstory. No matter — that’s how we cartoonists roll. As Robbie Robertson wrote: “Ya take what ya need and ya leave the rest…”

Speaking of backstories, three pages later Ben Schwartz gives us Beethoven on stage. What’s really interesting about the drawing is Mr. Schwartz’s sly nod to the great Al Hirschfeld.  Do I, or do I not see Nina-esque shout-outs in the drapes. I do.

Five pages later, a Mick Stevens cave man drawing (he also had one two issues back). I like that he’s used the words stalagmites and stalactites. A little memory trick I learned back in fourth or fifth grade — how to tell the difference between stalagmites and stalactites: stalactites are the ones pointing down; they need to hold on “tite” to the ceiling. 

Three pages later, a shrink meets legume drawing by the wonderful Victoria Roberts. A fun and funny drawing. What more can one ask for.

Next up,  a domestic situation courtesy of Will McPhail. Funny. Another three pages brings us to a sidewalk scene from Pia Guerra. Dogs lined up to use a fire hydrant. I found myself wishing for a line-jumping dog instead of a fireman…

Two pages later another intensely graphic drawing from William Haefeli. Detail-city! And very slice-o-life.

Three pages later, a typically formatted (three panel) Roz Chast drawing. The word “Comix” pops out here. On the very next page, A Haefeli-like (in its use of detail) drawing by Jeremy Nguyen. Yet another slice-o-life drawing. I like how he’s given us two folks in silhouette in the foreground — that’s different. 

Four pages later a subway drawing from P.C. Vey (although here the subway is not central to the drawing — the situation could’ve taken place in any number of situations). A few pages later A Zach Kanin drawing focused on recreational drugs. On the very next page, A Lars Kenseth drawing.  You know it’s his work within a nano-second of turning the page. No one draws like this. I don’t rate cartoons like the Cartoon Companion boys do, but occasionally I applaud a drawing. 

On the next page Kim Warp  has drawn a Spill favorite scenario: a bakery (in this case, a cupcake bakery). I didn’t realize at first that there as an enormous Charles Addams-like cupcake involved in the drawing (initially saw the drawing on a tablet screen before switching to a laptop).  An unusual cartoon in that I think it works both ways (with the big cupcake, and without).  Sweet. 

On the following page, a Paul Noth drawing with a splash of color.  You have to be familiar with the commercial character who’s central to this cartoon. Three pages later a Carolita Johnson umbrella triptych just in time for May showers. Six pages later, immediately following that aforementioned full page photo of Hitler, is an Amy Hwang domestic situation — another go-to for many cartoonists: the couple discovered in bed by a significant other. Three pages later, the last cartoon of the issue (not counting the caption contest drawings): an online whack-a-mole scenario from Sam Marlow.

Finally: we are oh-so-close to the one year anniversary of the disappearance of Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead. Here’s a Spill piece about it from last Fall when I was convinced the masthead would soon return. Not giving up hope on this, folks! 

Here’s the missing masthead:

 

*Dept of Corrections: an earlier version of the Monday Tilley Watch for the April 30th issue incorrectly listed Sam Marlow as Sam Means.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online: April 2-6, 2018; Borowitz Laff ‘O’ the Week; More Spills: Pia Guerra, MoCCA Fest

The current administration, as usual, provided, in one way or another, fodder for this week’s Daily cartoons. Brendan Loper‘s work book-ended the week with Peter Kuper, Jason Chatfield (and co-writer Scott Dooley), Jeremy Nguyen in between.

Over on Daily Shouts, contributing New Yorker cartoonists were  Jason Adam Katzenstein (aka JAK), Liana Finck, Tom Chitty, Olivia de Recatand a team effort by Dan Abromowitz and Eli Dreyfus.

You can see all the work (both Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts) here.

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Non-cartoon Laff ‘o’ the Week by Andy Borowitz:

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…FX has ordered a pilot of an adaptation of Y: The Last Man, a comic by Brian K. Vaughn and Pia Guerra The story here

…Don’t forget that MoCCA Fest 2018 is underway. Events galore over the next two days.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of April 9, 2018

Here’s  Bruce McCall speaking about his gluten-free-gluten cover, along with three cover sketches (a nice touch).

And here are the cartoonists in the issue:

A slightly different Monday Tilley Watch this week…I’m listing my first response as I (electronically) flip through the issue, as if the drawings are flashcards.

Bruce Eric Kaplan…rodents and a tiger — I really like the tiger.

Lars Kenseth…a Snidely Whiplash reversal.  Funny that the train is a toy (shades of Charles Addams).

Tom Cheney…internet mischief in olden times.

John Klossner…support food. Wonder what kind of animal is being served.  

Harry Bliss…Jake LaMotta on ice.  A very outta left field drawing.

Roz Chast…a wicked queen’s magic mirror, updated.

Paul Noth…a patient prefers male doctors.

Pia Guerra…a sacred cow & more

Ed Steed…strong strange man drawing, or strange strong man drawing.

William Haefeli…a lesson in capitalization.

Seth Fleishman…a turkey display, with color.

Joe Dator…a NYC tour bus. Finally, a comment on those noisy things that rumble around the great metropolis. 

Frank Cotham…a witness explains. 

Teresa Burns Parkhurst …an egg ponders. A candidate for The New Yorker Book of Poultry Cartoons.

Mike Twohy…a doggy snow globe.  I can’t get enough of dogs and snow globes. 

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Keen-eyed observers will note that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of The Town masthead is still in absentia. Here it is:

and here’s the stand-in:

To read more, go here.