Spinach, Part 2 with Shanahan, Steiner, and Weber

As anyone who follows cartoon art knows, nearly everything and anything is fair game, including other cartoons. The famous Carl Rose “spinach” cartoon from the December 8, 1928 New Yorker  (shown above) that was yesterday’s subject here (well, more precisely, its caption origin was the subject) spawned a number of later cartoons.  Danny Shanahan gets the credit for causing me to think about casting around the Cartoon Bank site, using search words/terms like “spinach”  “broccoli” and “the hell with it”  — here are three takes by three masters of the art of cartooning:

Danny Shanahan’s from the February 28, 2005 New Yorker:

Peter Steiner’s from the July 24, 2000 New Yorker:

 

Robert Weber’s take, the February 21, 1994 New Yorker:

 

 

Between You & Me &… Eustace Tilley; Peter Steiner’s Hopeless But Not Serious on ICE; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

Between You & Me &…Eustace Tilley

Here’s a fascinating addition to the Spill‘s archives: the Korean edition of Mary Norris‘s truly wonderful book, Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen. As you can see it sports Rea Irvin’s iconic cover from the New Yorker‘s inaugural issue. This usage of the cover is, to my knowledge, a first (Ms. Norris told me the cover came as “a complete surprise” to her). As you see below, Mr. Irvin’s clouds and green vertical border (the “strap”) were carried around on the back cover as well.  

 

Below: the US cover of Between You & Me (Norton, 2015), and to the right, the paperback edition. You’ll note that these covers use an adapted Irvin typeface. 

Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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Peter Steiner’s Hopeless But Not Serious on ICE

The great New Yorker cartoonist and author, Peter Steiner weighs in on ICE and children. See it here. 

Mr. Steiner’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Peter Steiner (above). Born, Cincinnati, 1940. New Yorker work: 1979 – . Collection: “I Didn’t Bite the Man, I Bit the Office” ( 1994).  Mr. Steiner is responsible for one of the most famous (and most republished) New Yorker cartoons in modern times, “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” (published July 5, 1993).  An indication of its enduring popularity in our culture:  a wikipedia page is devoted to it.   He has also had novels published, as well as the limited edition “An Atheist in Heaven.” Website: www.plsteiner.com/

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

If it’s Friday then it’s time for the Cartoon Companion’s latest look at the brand new drawings in this week’s issue (June 25, 2018). Joe Dator’s colorful Abe Lincoln drawing is awarded the CC‘s Top Toon ribbon, and rightfully so!  Read the post here.

The Tilley Watch Online: June 11-16, 2018; More Arthur Getz (at The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon)

Yet another Trumpian week for the Daily Cartoon. 

The participating cartoonists:  Danny Shanahan, one of the magazine’s modern masters, appeared twice in the week, with his second a nod to the climbing racoon we all fell in love with; Lars Kenseth, whose one-of-a-kind drawings also appeared twice (neither was a racoon drawing, unfortunately), and Lisa Rothstein, possibly making her Daily debut (someone please advise if this is incorrect).

And the Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Tom Chitty Jeremy Nguyen with David Ostow, Liana Finck, and honorary New Yorker cartoonist, Colin Stokes (he’s the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, and… he’s co-written a published New Yorker cartoon or two).

You can see all of the above work, and more, here.

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More Arthur Getz

I recently drove over to Sharon, Connecticut to catch the Arthur Getz exhibit at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon. It runs til the end of this month, so hurry and go before it’s gone! One of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists, Peter Steiner, joined me to tour the art on the walls, including the original art for the terrific cover shown above. This is a large piece (my guess is it’s about a yard tall), graphically powerful as a cover and even more so when you’re up close to the original (it’s currently hanging along a staircase). There are a number of other originals like it (in the wow category), but also a good number of small pieces (many “killed” covers) as well as some pastoral watercolors. Many of the pieces are for sale. A portfolio of work sits in one of the rooms — you can breeze through and pick up the original art for as close a look as you want.

Getz’s New Yorker work really shines through in this show. Mr. Steiner and I spent some time gazing at them, marveling at Getz’s ability to grasp the big picture so beautifully. I’m reluctant to label any specific period of The New Yorker as golden or aluminum or silver, or whatever, but as Mr. Getz’s career spanned 50 years (1938-1988)  his work certainly was being published during the magazine’s so-called Golden Age.

As mentioned on the Spill not long ago there’s a companion exhibit at the nearby Moviehouse in Millerton (NY) featuring much more of Getz’s New Yorker work. You really need to see that too (it runs through the end of August).

Slide Show of Interest: Liza Donnelly’s Live Drawings for CBS News; Blog of Interest: Peter Steiner’s “Hopeless But Not Serious”; Thurber’s “Many Moons” — the Chinese Edition

Slide Show of Interest: Liza Donnelly’s Live Drawings for CBS News

 CBS News has posted a slide show sampler of Liza Donnelly’s work from 2017 (she’s their resident cartoonist).  See it here

Below: the CBS News Control Room

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Blog of Interest: Peter Steiner’s “Hopeless But Not Serious”

Peter Steiner, the artist and writer who brought us one of the most popular New Yorker cartoons in modern times, regularly posts new work on his site. Link here to see it all!  

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Thurber’s Many Moons, the Chinese Edition

While browsing the web looking for the new and/or the unusual in the New Yorker cartoon universe I came upon the Chinese edition of James Thurber’s Many Moons.

Originally published in 1943 by Harcourt, Brace and Company, with the cover illustration and inside illustrations by Louis Slobodkin, the Chinese edition sports new cover art.

Below, left: the original cover.  On the right, the Chinese edition.

 

 

 

The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975 – 1985

With the publication of The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985, the word “Cartoon” makes its second appearance on an Album cover and in an Album  title (the first was on the cover of The Album of Sports and Games: Cartoons of Three Decades).  The magazine’s 60th anniversary not only saw this anthology published, but the magazine’s fans were treated to a fabulous show of cartoons and covers, curated by Barbara Nicholls, a former art assistant to James Geraghty (Ms. Nicholls went on to establish a gallery representing many of the New Yorker’s artists). 

Mounted at the New York Public Library, this was the show for anyone who loved the magazine’s art.  Following its run in New York, the exhibit went on the road across the country, and across the big pond. Here’s the brochure:

But now back to the anthology. You can see by the cover that the design is solidly in the school of the understated. The is no introduction within, no foreword, no dedication. Compare the cover to the cover of the 90th Anniversary Book of Cartoons (the Spill will eventually get to that on another Sunday) — you’ll see how graphic decision-making has changed.

The 1975- 1985 Album leads off with a spectacular full page drawing by Robert Weber, and it ends with a full page Charles Addams drawing.  In between you’ll find a rich array of the grand masters of the form: Steig, Steinberg, George Price, Dana Fradon, Warren Miller, Frank Modell,  the aforementioned  Weber and Addams, Henry Martin, Booth, Koren, Ed Arno ( but not Peter Arno, who had passed away in 1968), Whitney Darrow, Jr., James Stevenson, Ed Fisher…the list couldn’t go on and on — it was, after all, finite, but you get the idea.  Also in the Album, a new wave of cartoonists, including Mick Stevens, Leo Cullum, Liza Donnelly, the two Roz’s: Zanengo and Chast, Tom Cheney, Michael Crawford, Richard Cline, Bill Woodman, Peter Steiner, and Mike Twohy, among others (including yours truly). Jack Ziegler, who I’ve dubbed “The Godfather of Contemporary New Yorker Cartoonists”  was a late entry in the 1925-1975 Album (his first New Yorker cartoon was published in 1974. He’s represented in the 1925-1975 Album by one cartoon)Here, in the 1975-1985 Album his genius is on full display.  

This Album would be the last published during William Shawn’s editorship.  The next Album would not appear until the year 2000, the magazine’s 75th anniversary (in between was Lee Lorenz’s Art of The New Yorker: 1925- 1995). 

Below: the back cover of the The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985:

And the inside flap copy:

   

 

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn; Latest Cartoon Companion Posted; Q & A With Jacob Samuel

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn

 

In my hundreds of visits to the always interesting  Rodgers Book Barn in Hillsdale, New York I’d never walked in with six other New Yorker cartoonists…until yesterday.  The Book Barn’s owner, Maureen Rodgers  allowed us to sort of take over the place as we browsed and talked and generally hung out for an hour or so. 

Photo above: from left to right: Bob Eckstein, Sam Gross, Michael Maslin, Robert Leighton, Danny Shanahan, Peter Steiner, and Ken Krimstein

This group then moved on to the classic Martindale Diner, and eventually made its way to the Spill‘s world headquarters. Below is a photo of  Danny Shanahan, Ken Krimstein, and Bob Eckstein looking at a copy of Charles Addams’ Groaning Board. And that’s Sam Gross looking at Peter Arno’s Parade. (photos courtesy of Robert Leighton).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Latest Cartoon Companion Posted

Speaking of cartoons and cartoonists…the latest Cartoon Companion has been posted. The CC boys rate the latest the cartoons in the New Yorker;  this issue features, among others, the Grim Reaper playing hide-and-seek, Orpheus in an elevator, and the big bad wolf using an inhaler.  See it all here.

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A Q&A With Jacob Samuel

From CJNews.com, June 22, 2017 , “Cartoonist Depicts Millennial Misery With Slinky Hell” — this Q&A with Jacob Samuel, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Link here to visit Mr. Samuel’s website.