The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975 – 1985

With the publication of The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985, the word “Cartoon” makes its second appearance on an Album cover and in an Album  title (the first was on the cover of The Album of Sports and Games: Cartoons of Three Decades).  The magazine’s 60th anniversary not only saw this anthology published, but the magazine’s fans were treated to a fabulous show of cartoons and covers, curated by Barbara Nicholls, a former art assistant to James Geraghty (Ms. Nicholls went on to establish a gallery representing many of the New Yorker’s artists). 

Mounted at the New York Public Library, this was the show for anyone who loved the magazine’s art.  Following its run in New York, the exhibit went on the road across the country, and across the big pond. Here’s the brochure:

But now back to the anthology. You can see by the cover that the design is solidly in the school of the understated. The is no introduction within, no foreword, no dedication. Compare the cover to the cover of the 90th Anniversary Book of Cartoons (the Spill will eventually get to that on another Sunday) — you’ll see how graphic decision-making has changed.

The 1975- 1985 Album leads off with a spectacular full page drawing by Robert Weber, and it ends with a full page Charles Addams drawing.  In between you’ll find a rich array of the grand masters of the form: Steig, Steinberg, George Price, Dana Fradon, Warren Miller, Frank Modell,  the aforementioned  Weber and Addams, Henry Martin, Booth, Koren, Ed Arno ( but not Peter Arno, who had passed away in 1968), Whitney Darrow, Jr., James Stevenson, Ed Fisher…the list couldn’t go on and on — it was, after all, finite, but you get the idea.  Also in the Album, a new wave of cartoonists, including Mick Stevens, Leo Cullum, Liza Donnelly, the two Roz’s: Zanengo and Chast, Tom Cheney, Michael Crawford, Richard Cline, Bill Woodman, Peter Steiner, and Mike Twohy, among others (including yours truly). Jack Ziegler, who I’ve dubbed “The Godfather of Contemporary New Yorker Cartoonists”  was a late entry in the 1925-1975 Album (his first New Yorker cartoon was published in 1974. He’s represented in the 1925-1975 Album by one cartoon)Here, in the 1975-1985 Album his genius is on full display.  

This Album would be the last published during William Shawn’s editorship.  The next Album would not appear until the year 2000, the magazine’s 75th anniversary (in between was Lee Lorenz’s Art of The New Yorker: 1925- 1995). 

Below: the back cover of the The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985:

And the inside flap copy:

   

 

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn; Latest Cartoon Companion Posted; Q & A With Jacob Samuel

Seven New Yorker Cartoonists Walk Into a Book Barn

 

In my hundreds of visits to the always interesting  Rodgers Book Barn in Hillsdale, New York I’d never walked in with six other New Yorker cartoonists…until yesterday.  The Book Barn’s owner, Maureen Rodgers  allowed us to sort of take over the place as we browsed and talked and generally hung out for an hour or so. 

Photo above: from left to right: Bob Eckstein, Sam Gross, Michael Maslin, Robert Leighton, Danny Shanahan, Peter Steiner, and Ken Krimstein

This group then moved on to the classic Martindale Diner, and eventually made its way to the Spill‘s world headquarters. Below is a photo of  Danny Shanahan, Ken Krimstein, and Bob Eckstein looking at a copy of Charles Addams’ Groaning Board. And that’s Sam Gross looking at Peter Arno’s Parade. (photos courtesy of Robert Leighton).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Latest Cartoon Companion Posted

Speaking of cartoons and cartoonists…the latest Cartoon Companion has been posted. The CC boys rate the latest the cartoons in the New Yorker;  this issue features, among others, the Grim Reaper playing hide-and-seek, Orpheus in an elevator, and the big bad wolf using an inhaler.  See it all here.

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A Q&A With Jacob Samuel

From CJNews.com, June 22, 2017 , “Cartoonist Depicts Millennial Misery With Slinky Hell” — this Q&A with Jacob Samuel, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Link here to visit Mr. Samuel’s website.

Peter Steiner Pencilled; Jeremy Nguyen Profiled

Peter Steiner, who brought us this classic New Yorker cartoon, tells us about his tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils. Read it here!

Link to Peter Steiner’s website.

 

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Jeremy Nguyen, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker this past February, is the subject of this brief profile in Bedford + Bowery.

Link to Jeremy Nguyen’s website.

Cartoons & Politics Mix

img-20170105-132631_3_orig-300x300From The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, “Exclusive Interview: Francoise Mouly and Nadja Spiegelman Resist!” Resist will be  distributed, free of charge,  on the day of the Women’s March on Washington in these cities:  Washington, D.C., New York City, Des Moines,, Portland, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.  It includes work by comic artists from abroad and the United States, including a number of New Yorker artists.

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From dnainfo, January, 13, 2017: “Artists Respond to Election in Hairpin Arts Center’s Newest Series”New Yorker artist Tom Bachtell‘s work appears (among others) in this Chicago exhibit.

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Vassar James Palmer GalleryComing soon to Vassar College’s James Palmer Gallery, “The World After January 20, 2017: Works By Contemporary Artists and Poets, February 2-16, 2017” — the exhibit features work by a number of artists (several New Yorker cartoonists are represented, including Liza Donnelly, and Peter Steiner)

Jerry Dumas Profiled; Peter Steiner’s “Hopeless But Not Serious” Returns; Gerberg Talks Cartoons

dumasFrom The Comics Journal, January 6, 2017, “Jerry Dumas, Cartoonist and Poet” — Mr. Dumas, who died this past November, is profiled by a comics writer, R.C. Harvey.

Ink Spill’s notice of Jerry Dumas’s passing.

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Peter Steiner, author of the classic New Yorker cartoon, “On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog”  has a new post on his Hopeless but not Serious site.  Go see.

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the-art-in-cartooningMort Gerberg will give a talk, “The Magazine Cartoon: Telling a Story in Only One Panel” at the New School in late February.

Left: The Art of Cartooning, published by Scribner in 1975, edited by Ron Wolin, Mr. Gerberg, and the late New Yorker cartoonist, Ed Fisher.

See Ink Spill‘s notice of Ed Fisher’s passing here.