The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of July 2, 2018

  Link here to read what Barry Blitt had to say about his tied-in to the headlines cover (shown above).

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One of these days I’m going to gather all the New Yorker covers that’ve incorporated the Statue of Liberty. For now, I took a look back to see when Lady Liberty first appeared on a New Yorker cover. Surprisingly, it took awhile to show up what with the the magazine being, in those earliest of issues, so New York City-centric. Its debut was on the Sue Williams cover of September 7, 1929:

 The Statue’s next appearance was on the cover of June 24, 1939, when artist Leonard Dove incorporated it humorously:

It wasn’t until the end of WW2 that the statue appeared again — in the issue dated the week the war ended with Japan’s surrender. Alan Dunn shows us a troop ship arriving home in New York Harbor; soldiers are sticking their heads out of portholes, looking to see Lady Liberty way off in the distance, her silhouette just barely decipherable. Graphically speaking, in this instance less is powerfully more.

And now on to the current issue, close to seventy-three years later.  From the Dept. of Just Sayin’:  21 illustrations this week, 3 of them full pages. Just 10 cartoons (plus one full page by Ed Steed).

Noting two of the ten this week: Roz Chast makes excellent use of one of the cartoonist’s handiest tools: the hot dog cart. In this case it’s floss being sold not franks. What I really like about Ms. Chast’s cartoon is that it falls into the wonderful New Yorker cartoon vein of being both surprising and highly relatable. It delivers on Peter Arno’s definition of a good cartoon: a drawing that deals a one-two punch.  If the Spill handed out ribbons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion site, this cartoon would be awarded one. The Spill does, however, applaud.

The other cartoon noted is by Seth Fleishman.  Bulls driving racing cars at Pamplona, with the lead car driven by a person.  A lovely drawing. I believe there are at least two Charles Addams cartoons with a moose driving a car, but bulls driving cars is a rarity. One somewhat closer to Mr. Fleishman’s that comes readily to mind (forgive me) is a drawing of mine from the ancient times. It appeared in The New Yorker, March 7, 1989 — technically, those are steer.

 

For the record, your honor, here’s the list of cartoonists in the issue (the aforementioned Mr. Steed’s page is listed higher up on the Table of Contents):

Lastly, here’s Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead from The New Yorker.  It disappeared in May of 2017, bafflingly replaced by a redrawn version. For more on this, go here.

— See you next week

  

 

  

 

 

 

Photo of Interest: Peter Arno Singing & Playing Piano; More From the Buchanan Files via Mike Lynch

Peter Arno Singing & Playing Piano

Was very pleased  to see one of Stanley Kubrick’s Arno photos make it into The New York Times review of the Kubrick photo exhibit. The reviewer, Arthur Lubow, had this to say about the photo:

A striking shot at the piano of Peter Arno, the New Yorker cartoonist and bon vivant, with eyes shut and mouth open, an ashtray holding down the sheet music, is composed with masterly precision.

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More From the Buchanan Files via Lynch

Dick Buchanan has reached into his extensive clip file for a fun bunch of cartoons from the 1930s. Most of these folks were published in The New Yorker, including Dorothy McKay whose drawing  below appeared in Life magazine.  See the rest here on Mike Lynch’s blog, posted May 3, 2018.

The other New Yorker cartoonists in the post: Gardner Rea, Gluyas Williams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Charles Addams, Chon Day, Richard Decker, Ned Hilton, George Shellhase, Leonard Dove, Syd Hoff, Otto Soglow, and William Steig.

Below is Ms. McKay’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Dorothy McKay ( Self portrait above from Meet the Artist, 1943; Photo from Cartoon Humor, 1938) Born c.1904, died June, 1974 New York City. New Yorker work: 1934 -1936.

 

Talk of Interest: Joe Dator; New Yorker State of Mind Looks at Ralph Barton; An Intersection of Steinberg, Walt Disney and Ungerer?; Stanley Kubrick and Peter Arno; Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

Talk of Interest: Joe Dator

From The Pioneer, April 3, 2018, “New Yorker Cartoonist Shares Insight”—  a piece about a recent talk at Long Island University by one of the New Yorker‘s best contemporary cartoonists (above, right, a segment of his classic piece, How We Do It  from the New Yorker,  September 24 2012

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A New Yorker State of Mind Looks at the Issue of March 16, 1929

This blog is enjoyable as heck. Bonus: lots of Ralph Barton in this particular post . See it here

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Book of Interest: Van Spatz by Anna Haifisch

A book bringing together Walt Disney, Tomi Ungerer, and Steinberg? Read about their fictional intersection here.

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Arno Included in a Stanley Kubrick Photo Exhibit

An exhibit of Stanley Kubrick’s photos for Look magazine will open May 3rd at the Museum of the City of New York.  Peter Arno will be among the subjects on display. Kubrick spent three days photographing Arno in late July 1949. As I wrote in my Arno bio: “The photographs amount to the best visual insight we’ll likely ever have into Arno’s private life…”

I used two photos from the Museum’s Kubrick collection in the Arno bio; one appears on the back cover shown above (that’s the actress Joan Sinclair he’s with at Joan Braun’s Palace Bar).  You can see all the photos — nearly 300 — in the Museum’s collection  here.  

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Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

It wouldn’t be Friday without a brand new Cartoon Companion (well, it would be, but never mind). The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” return with a rated close look at the cartoons appearing in the issue of April 9, 2018 (it’s the one with the Bruce McCall gluten themed cover). It’s always fun to see how much one agrees or disagrees with their ratings.

 

 

Armed Services Editions: Thurber, Benchley, White, Arno, O’Hara, Parker, Woollcott & More

The Spill has been very fortunate over its decade plus span to receive numerous contributions to its archives. The latest is a treasure trove of Armed Services Editions from Prof. Brian Anderson of Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, NC..  Prof. Anderson, seeing an ASE-related post on this site, recently supplied a list of the New Yorker related editions as well as a box of editions (many of which you see above). Also in the box: a pony edition of The New Yorker, dated January 27, 1945, cover by Perry Barlow.  Prof. Anderson, along with Molly Guptill Manning are curating an exhibit of Armed Services Editions at the Grolier Club in the spring of 2020.

Here’s a short list of titles by some favorites (the bolded ones are in the Spill‘s archives):

The New Yorker’s Baedeker 819
New Yorker Profiles 955
The New Yorker Reporter at Large 1066

By Thurber
My World and Welcome to It A-11 (reprinted as S-5)
My Life and Hard Times L-2 (856)
Let Your Mind Alone N-7 (rpt 755)
The Middle Aged Man on the Flying Trapeze I-253 (rpt 705)
The Thurber Carnival 970

With E. B. White
Is Sex Necessary M-2 (rpt 1016)

By E. B. White
One Man’s Meat P-26
Quo Vadimas 696

With Katharine White A Subtreasury of American Humor  F-176 

Margaret Case Harriman Take Them up Tenderly  Q-26

 Walter Bernstein Keep Your Head Down  903

Charles Boyer Dark Ship  1156

John McNulty Third Avenue, New York  1180

Joseph Mitchell McSorley’s Wonderful Saloon D-108

Dorothy Parker Selected Short Stories R-4

John O’Hara Pipe Night 741

John O’Hara The Doctor’s Son and Other Stories 979

Robert Benchley After 1903 What? R-5

Samuel Hopkins Adams A. Woollcott 931

The Bedside Tales / Introduction by Peter Arno 933

 

Spiegelman on Maus & Post-Maus; Cartoonists & Cookbooks

From Kentwired.com, March 7, 2018, “Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Art Spiegelman Discusses Politics and Identity”Maus and more from the celebrated cartoonist who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992.

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Cartoonists & Cookbooks

The Cartoonist Cookbook popped up on an online search yesterday.  Published in 1966 by Hobbs, Dorman & Co., it includes 45 favorite recipes by strip cartoonists. I was only able to find a partial list of contributors.*  Here’s a short post about the book.

 

I’m certain that that’s a Virgil Partch drawing in the first column, five squares down on the front cover. Here’s his Spill A-Z entry:

Virgil Partch ( VIP) (pictured above) Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. NYer work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

Also showing up online was this Charles Addams cookbook that I somehow missed over the past few years (Simon & Schuster, 2005):

The only thing close to either of these in the Spill‘s library is the below desserts cookbook featuring a Peter Arno cover (but, alas, no recipes by Arno, who liked to cook).

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*Thanks to the cartoonist, Eli Stein, we now have the entire list of contributors to the Cartoonist Cook Book.  My thanks to Mr. Stein for forwarding.