Fairfield County (CT) Cartoonists; E.B. and Katharine White’s Home for Sale; Lots of Peter Arno on Pinterest; William Steig’s Connecticut Home For Sale

Fairfield County Connecticut’s Cartoonists

Here’s a really nice article in Vanity Fair, “When Fairfield County Was the Comic-Strip Capital of The World” written by Cullen Murphy, whose father drew “Prince Valiant” — a number of New Yorker artists show up (as you might expect as the county also had a large concentration of  cartoonists from the magazine…see this link for more on that).

 

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E.B. and Katharine White’s Home For Sale

From Town & Country, this article  — with photos — on the home previously owned by E.B. and Katharine White, now up for sale.

Why is this on Ink Spill, you might ask?  The White’s were major figures in the development of the New Yorker; both intersected with the magazine’s cartoons. One of Mr. White’s many duties at the New Yorker  was tinkering with cartoon captions. The most famous tinkering resulted in the Carl Rose drawing that appeared in the December 8, 1928 New Yorker:spinach

“It’s broccoli, dear.”

“I say it’s spinach, and I say the hell with it.” 

To read a little more about that particular caption, go here.

In the earliest decades of the New Yorker, Katharine White headed the fiction department. The cartoons fell under the fiction department’s umbrella until James Geraghty was appointed in 1939, when a stand alone art department was created.  In his book, The Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995,  the magazine’s former Art Editor, Lee Lorenz wrote of Ms. White: “She remained a powerful voice in the selection of the magazine’s art even after she and her second husband, E. B. White, moved to Maine in the mid-thirties.”

Two recommended biographies: Scott Elledge’s E.B. White: A Biography (Norton, 1984)

and Linda Davis’s Onward and Upward: A Biography of Katharine S. White (Harper & Row, 1987)

And for a wonderful read on that era of the New Yorker: Thomas Vinciguerra’s Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber, And the Golden Age of The New Yorker (W.W. Norton & Co.,  2016)

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A lot of Peter Arno on Pinterest

Billed as “182 Best Peter Arno Images on Pinterest” — it doesn’t disappoint. The post even includes the dummy cover for my Arno biography.

Anyway, it’s fun to see so much Arno in one place. New Yorker cartoons, New Yorker covers, advertisements — all kinds of wonderful art by the master.

 

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William Steig’s Kent Connecticut Home For Sale

Fear not — Ink Spill is not pushing real estate.  It’s just coincidence (or as Curly of the Three Stooges would say, “a coinkydink”) that two homes by three major New Yorker figures are up for sale. This is William Steig’s home in Kent, Connecticut. Read all about the home here.

Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 4: Steinberg; Liza Donnelly Live-Draws The Late Show with Stephen Colbert; Rejected New Yorker Covers by Whittington, Higgins; Video: New York City in the 1920s

Steinberg did ad work?  You bet.  As with William Steig, a Steinberg Part 2 will be posted at some later time. 

Warren Bernard,  Executive Director of SPX, is the one responsible for researching & gathering all these images. My thanks to Warren for allowing them to appear here.

Here are the dates for these ads:  Emerson, 1948; House & Garden, 1955; Morton International, 1966; Jones & Lamson, 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Steinberg’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

 

Saul Steinberg  (above) Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

CBS News Resident Cartoonist, Liza Donnelly, visited the Ed Sullivan Theater  (yeah yeah yeah!) the other day to draw The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Here’s an article on The Huffington Post about her visit.  And go here to see more of her Late Show drawings and read what she had to say about the experience.

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Rejected New Yorker Covers by Whittington, Higgins

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery continues its look at proposed (and ultimately rejected) New Yorker covers. 

In the past few days we’ve seen this one by Donald Higgins, and in AB’s latest post, one by Larry Whittington. See and read all about them here.

 

 

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Video: New York City in the 1920s

If you have twelve minutes to spare, here’s a fun video of  New York City in the 1920s from Hey New York State. The screen grab shows Peter Arno tussling Alexander Woollcott’s hair (you can see that that happens at the 11:34 mark — it’s very brief). Other highlights: George Gershwin rehearsing, Chaplin playing piano, Fanny Brice singing (the video is mostly silent, but Ms. Brice is heard), some waterfront footage and Manhattan street scenes galore…check it out here. 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 2: William Steig

And now for Part 2 of what will be many parts  of an adwork display by New Yorker cartoonists, all courtesy of   Warren Bernard, indefatigable cartoon collector, and Executive Director of the Small Press Expo, or SPX.   

There are too many ads by William Steig to show in one sitting, so he’ll have to have his own Part 2 and Part 3.

All but one of these Steig ads are in his earlier style, before he went into his fabulous finer line period. The exception is the Nicholson Hacksaw Blade ad from 1966 where you see the style found in his childrens book as well as on his later New Yorker covers. The dates for the other ads: Delco Batteries: 1960; Cheerios: 1950; Kinsey Gin: 1945; Drano: 1948

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of many interesting New Yorker nuggets I came across while researching my biography of Peter Arno was the feeling at the magazine,  back in the early 1940s, that too many of its artists (Arno being foremost, of course) were feeling emboldened by their successes in the advertising world and not as beholden to The New Yorker for their livelihood. Harold Ross, the magazine’s founder and first editor, was, I believe, happier when he was holding all the cards. 

Here’s Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov.ember 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., October 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1: Peter Arno; Shanahan’s Sharks

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1

Warren Bernard, author of the wonderful book, Cartoons For Victory, as well as Executive Director of The Small Press Expo, has generously allowed the Spill access to hundreds of images he has collected that depict advertising work executed by New Yorker cartoonists. The Spill will post these from time-to-time. This is not an all-inclusive survey, but a look back at some interesting work mostly lost to time (many of these ads were unknown to me until recently).

We’ll start with a handful of ads featuring the unmistakable drawings of Peter Arno. Arno’s drawings were in high demand by Madison Avenue during the four decades he contributed to The New Yorker. They were the lucrative sideline that went a long way to helping him live the Park Avenue penthouse life he at times lived.

I’m only showing a few of his ads here, and not including the entire run of Pepsi-Cola ads that so riled Harold Ross (the New Yorker’s founder and first editor) — those will be for another time.  Also for another time: the Gem Razor ad campaign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Bernard has helpfully identified the date of each ad:  Alemite (1949); Kindness (1968); Calvert Reserve (1944); Jockey (1939); Ry-Krisp (1941)

Here’s Mr. Arno’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

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Shanahan’s Sharks

Attempted Bloggery has found a Danny Shanahan New Yorker cover that’s been enhanced by the artist himself.

Mr. Nadler, who runs the AB, notes it’s a fine way to kick off the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week.

Link here to see Danny Shanahan’s New Yorker work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch

A new feature in the new week. Around here at the Spill this roller coaster cartoon life begins anew every monday with the publication of the latest issue of the New Yorker. 

The latest issue is the klieg light for cartoonists; we go to it with some higher level of curiosity: to see who’s in and what our colleagues have come up with; to see, and yes, judge, whether we believe the work is great, good, bad, or so-so; whether there’s a just published drawing exactly like the one we were about to submit; whether there’s a drawing we’ll never forget, or never remember.  I’ve always thought of every new issue’s cartoons as fuel — whether I like what I see or dislike it, it somehow gets the new week going…with a bang.

The Monday Tilley Watch is a look at the latest issue. I’ll record whose work we see, and whatever peripheral thought about the cartoon or cartoonist hits me at the moment. I’ll likely wander into other departments as well (at least mentioning the Art Department’s baby: the cover).  It is not at all like what my friends over at the Cartoon Companion do. They dissect each cartoon and then rate it, bringing an objectivity to this party I can’t (neither of the Cartoon Companion fellows contribute to The New Yorker…yet).

And off we go. 

  The issue of July 24, 2017

… We begin with a political cover by Barry Blitt (surprise!) featuring the President and two of his children —  the cover was already mentioned, and shown here at the end of last week…I note on the Table of Contents that there are no special cartoon features this week (no full pages…at least, none listed here… no spreads, etc.)..and then onto The Talk of The Town, still headed by the newly modernized Rea Irvin masthead. I’m going to keep wishing the previous masthead returns — the one that was in place for 91 years. The magazine has, in very recent times, tried out redesigns up front only to pull them back. If only it would happen here.  I also note on the Talk page that there’s a wonderful Tom Bachtell drawing of the President and his in-the-news son; Donald and Donald, Jr. making their second appearance in the issue and we’re only 15 pages in. 

The first cartoon of the issue is by a relative newcomer, Amy Hwang, who’s closing in on her seventh year contributing to the magazine…it’s followed by a P.C. Vey cartoon featuring nudity. There haven’t been all that many nude cartoon characters in the New Yorker in recent years, so, a novelty.  Mr. Vey’s been contributing to The New Yorker for quite some time (his first appeared in 1993)…then a Barbara Smaller drawing — it might possibly be related to the Trump family, or not (Ms. Smaller’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1996); an Edward Koren drawing is up next.  Mr. Koren is our senior (in terms of years contributing) cartoonist, and a national treasure — his first New Yorker drawing appeared in May of 1962…

Paul Karasik, whose first drawing appeared in 1999, has the next drawing. No cartoonist can resist drawing talking fish in a fishbowl.  Mr. Karasik’s other lines of work include teaching and authoring (his new book, How to Read Nancy, was noted on the Spill  last week). Liana Finck is next.  We rarely see scout drawings in the magazine anymore.  I think back to some classics by Peter Arno and Charles Addams.  It should be noted that Ms. Finck, whose first drawing appeared in the magazine in 2013,  has an opening this week of her Instagram work.   Next is a doctor-themed drawing by one who knows about doctors, Ben Schwartz

…Sam Gross, another national treasure, has the next cartoon — let’s just say it’s about the working life of dogs.  Mr. Gross’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1969. Mr. Gross is among a small group whose work I enjoy at first sight, before even taking in the what the drawing is all about (George Booth and the aforementioned Edward Koren come to mind as among the others in that group — I love seeing their work).  Next up is another relative newcomer (first drawing in The New Yorker in 2013), Ed Steed.  Three on-the-dark-side cartoons by Mr. Steed in the last three issues. Of note: this one stretches along the very bottom of two pages…

…Mr. Steed’s drawing is followed by the veteran, Roz Chast (her first cartoon was published in the magazine in 1978).  I love how this particular cartoon looks on the page (yesterday’s Spill concerned itself with placement). William Haefeli‘s drawing is next (first New Yorker drawing: 1998).  Mr. Haefeli has one of the most distinctive styles of this current stable of cartoonists.  And speaking of distinctive styles, Drew Dernavich has the next cartoon.  Some cartoonist’s styles are easily summarized (“the dot guy” for instance) —  Mr. Dernavich’s tag might be “the woodcut guy.” (Mr. Dernavich should not be confused with John Held, Jr., the New Yorker ‘s much earlier “woodcut guy”).   A Robert Leighton cartoon is next. Mr. Leighton is the artist behind this classic cartoon. His first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in 2002. In this new drawing he mixes crime with a food cart.   Alex Gregory’s very Summery drawing follows.  Mr. Gregory, like a few other cartoonists, has another whole career: he’s a writer for the award-winning televison show, VEEP.  His first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1999.

As usual, The Cartoon Caption Contest ends the issue. Drawings by David Borchart (first New Yorker cartoon published 2007), Tom Cheney (first New Yorker cartoon published 1978), and P.C. Vey. The drawings feature a food cart (two food carts in this issue!), a whole lot of business men following some ancient warriors on horses, and a hospital scene that blends in a little stadium gear.   

 

 

 

50 Years Ago This Week…In The New Yorker

A Summer of Love issue of The New Yorker begins with Peter Arno’s 98th cover for the magazine (out of 101). Arno’s color palette in his last years had turned (mostly) brighter, his composition (mostly) a little more casual. This cover is an excellent example.

Within the magazine we find an array of graphically balanced cartoons appearing on the pages in a variety of sizes: a half-page Warren Miller drawing; a wonderful Steig drawing of a King –the drawing sits at the bottom of the page, surrounded on three sides by text; a perfectly-sized classic beauty from Ronald Searle (shown below); a  Modell drawing, done in his trademark casual style, sits across from a (typically) densely drawn Alan Dunn cartoon;  an easy on the eyes Stevenson drawing of two witches settling in to watch Julia Child is placed across from a Steinberg drawing of the eye of providence (that pyramid with the eye that’s on the backside of the U.S. dollar bill).  Unlike Stevenson’s drawing, which you pause to look at, enjoy and then move on, you feel as if you should pull up a chair and get out a magnifying glass for the Steinberg illustration. It’s time to inspect.

A few pages later on in the issue I was surprised to come across a 5 part Stan Hunt drawing. Did he do a lot of these? I don’t remember seeing one before (it’s a question to be answered another time).  The Hunt is followed by a nearly full-page  Everett Opie cartoon and then a masterful Saxon drawing (also almost a full page).

The last drawing of the issue is by the wonderful Henry Martin. Like Steig’s King drawing, it appears at the bottom of the page surrounded on three sides by text. There’s plenty of white space around the business man noticing a sign in a window, “Data Processed While U Wait” — the man’s right leg and his briefcase are allowed to drift off towards the edge of the page itself — a cartoonist’s work beautifully handled by the New Yorker‘s long-time layout person, Carmine Peppe, who, according to Brendan Gill, “would properly set off whatever we published.”