The Monday Tilley Watch

A new feature in the new week. Around here at the Spill this roller coaster cartoon life begins anew every monday with the publication of the latest issue of the New Yorker. 

The latest issue is the klieg light for cartoonists; we go to it with some higher level of curiosity: to see who’s in and what our colleagues have come up with; to see, and yes, judge, whether we believe the work is great, good, bad, or so-so; whether there’s a just published drawing exactly like the one we were about to submit; whether there’s a drawing we’ll never forget, or never remember.  I’ve always thought of every new issue’s cartoons as fuel — whether I like what I see or dislike it, it somehow gets the new week going…with a bang.

The Monday Tilley Watch is a look at the latest issue. I’ll record whose work we see, and whatever peripheral thought about the cartoon or cartoonist hits me at the moment. I’ll likely wander into other departments as well (at least mentioning the Art Department’s baby: the cover).  It is not at all like what my friends over at the Cartoon Companion do. They dissect each cartoon and then rate it, bringing an objectivity to this party I can’t (neither of the Cartoon Companion fellows contribute to The New Yorker…yet).

And off we go. 

  The issue of July 24, 2017

… We begin with a political cover by Barry Blitt (surprise!) featuring the President and two of his children —  the cover was already mentioned, and shown here at the end of last week…I note on the Table of Contents that there are no special cartoon features this week (no full pages…at least, none listed here… no spreads, etc.)..and then onto The Talk of The Town, still headed by the newly modernized Rea Irvin masthead. I’m going to keep wishing the previous masthead returns — the one that was in place for 91 years. The magazine has, in very recent times, tried out redesigns up front only to pull them back. If only it would happen here.  I also note on the Talk page that there’s a wonderful Tom Bachtell drawing of the President and his in-the-news son; Donald and Donald, Jr. making their second appearance in the issue and we’re only 15 pages in. 

The first cartoon of the issue is by a relative newcomer, Amy Hwang, who’s closing in on her seventh year contributing to the magazine…it’s followed by a P.C. Vey cartoon featuring nudity. There haven’t been all that many nude cartoon characters in the New Yorker in recent years, so, a novelty.  Mr. Vey’s been contributing to The New Yorker for quite some time (his first appeared in 1993)…then a Barbara Smaller drawing — it might possibly be related to the Trump family, or not (Ms. Smaller’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1996); an Edward Koren drawing is up next.  Mr. Koren is our senior (in terms of years contributing) cartoonist, and a national treasure — his first New Yorker drawing appeared in May of 1962…

Paul Karasik, whose first drawing appeared in 1999, has the next drawing. No cartoonist can resist drawing talking fish in a fishbowl.  Mr. Karasik’s other lines of work include teaching and authoring (his new book, How to Read Nancy, was noted on the Spill  last week). Liana Finck is next.  We rarely see scout drawings in the magazine anymore.  I think back to some classics by Peter Arno and Charles Addams.  It should be noted that Ms. Finck, whose first drawing appeared in the magazine in 2013,  has an opening this week of her Instagram work.   Next is a doctor-themed drawing by one who knows about doctors, Ben Schwartz

…Sam Gross, another national treasure, has the next cartoon — let’s just say it’s about the working life of dogs.  Mr. Gross’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1969. Mr. Gross is among a small group whose work I enjoy at first sight, before even taking in the what the drawing is all about (George Booth and the aforementioned Edward Koren come to mind as among the others in that group — I love seeing their work).  Next up is another relative newcomer (first drawing in The New Yorker in 2013), Ed Steed.  Three on-the-dark-side cartoons by Mr. Steed in the last three issues. Of note: this one stretches along the very bottom of two pages…

…Mr. Steed’s drawing is followed by the veteran, Roz Chast (her first cartoon was published in the magazine in 1978).  I love how this particular cartoon looks on the page (yesterday’s Spill concerned itself with placement). William Haefeli‘s drawing is next (first New Yorker drawing: 1998).  Mr. Haefeli has one of the most distinctive styles of this current stable of cartoonists.  And speaking of distinctive styles, Drew Dernavich has the next cartoon.  Some cartoonist’s styles are easily summarized (“the dot guy” for instance) —  Mr. Dernavich’s tag might be “the woodcut guy.” (Mr. Dernavich should not be confused with John Held, Jr., the New Yorker ‘s much earlier “woodcut guy”).   A Robert Leighton cartoon is next. Mr. Leighton is the artist behind this classic cartoon. His first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in 2002. In this new drawing he mixes crime with a food cart.   Alex Gregory’s very Summery drawing follows.  Mr. Gregory, like a few other cartoonists, has another whole career: he’s a writer for the award-winning televison show, VEEP.  His first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1999.

As usual, The Cartoon Caption Contest ends the issue. Drawings by David Borchart (first New Yorker cartoon published 2007), Tom Cheney (first New Yorker cartoon published 1978), and P.C. Vey. The drawings feature a food cart (two food carts in this issue!), a whole lot of business men following some ancient warriors on horses, and a hospital scene that blends in a little stadium gear.   

 

 

 

Interview of Interest: Frank Cotham; Karasik Talks “Nancy”; Shannon Wheeler at SPX; The Tilley Watch: A Flake Follow-Up & Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoon Companion has posted Part 1 of an interview with long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Frank CothamRead it here.  Above: one of Mr. Cotham’s porch drawings published in the New Yorker,.  April 1, 2013 (click on it to enlarge).

Note: For more Cotham, you might enjoy this Spill interview from 2013

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Karasik Talks “Nancy”

Paul Karasik and his co-author Mark Newgarden will be at The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium this Fall discussing their forthcoming How To Read Nancy.  Details here.

 

 

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Shannon Wheeler at SPX

Too Much Coffee Man himself, Shannon Wheeler will appear at the upcoming Small Press Expo this Fall. Details here.

 

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A Tilley Watch Follow-Up to “Checking In With: Emily Flake”

…For a Cartoon Lounge segment, released today featuring Emily Flake  at the New Yorker‘s offices with the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, go here.

 

The New Yorker has rush released next week’s cover (by Barry Blitt):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honoring & Remembering Paul Peter Porges; Karasik’s Vineyard Graphic

Honoring & Remembering Paul Peter Porges

Last Thursday a large crowd of friends, relatives, and colleagues from MAD and The New Yorker  filled the Ethical Cultural Society’s Ceremonial Hall  on Manhattan’s Upper West Side to celebrate the life of Paul Peter Porges (left), who passed away last December.

Among the speakers was Mr. Porges’s close friend, New Yorker artist, Sam Gross who hilariously recalled making the rounds of cartoon departments with Mr. Porges in the golden age of cartooning (a link to video of Mr. Gross delivering his remarks is in the works).  Also in attendance from the New Yorker  were Liza Donnelly, myself, Bob Eckstein and Mort Gerberg.  Among the MAD crowd attending were Mort Drucker, Sam Viviano, Desmond Devlin, Irving Shields, Dick DeBartolo, John Ficarra, Barry Liebman and Dorothy Crouch.

Remarks and remembrances were followed by a show of photographs, and following that,  small hand painted stones as you see pictured here, were handed out.  (Mr. Porges was know to many as “PPP” — pronounced, “pay pay pay”). 

Photo credits: Paul Peter Porges:  Felipe Galindo;

Sam Gross at the podium: Liza Donnelly

 

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Paul Karasik’s Graphic: Vineyard Gazette Press Run

From Paul Karasik‘s blog, Rules to Vivere By, June 30, 2017, “Vineyard Gazette Press Run” —  See it all here!

 

 

Resist! #2 Arrives July 4th With An Abundance of New Yorker Contributors

 

The second issue of Resist!, a free “political comics zine of mostly female artists” (a “Man Cave” section is included) edited by Nadja Spiegelman and The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, will be distributed this coming July 4th in comic book stores and out on the streets by volunteers (approximately 60,000 copies of the first Resist! were distributed this past January).

Go here to find out where you can find a copy near you

According to a press release “the free distribution of Resist! is intended as an Independence Day celebration of the First Amendment, of our diverse country and of our resilience.”

The Editors write in the introductory pages of #2: “These pages contain many individual realities.  They reflect topics as diverse as their contributors: the environment, immigration, racism and the economy.”

Artists represented in this 96 page anthology are from all over the world, but as the Spill’s focus is  primarily New Yorker contributors, I’m  listing the artists whose work has been published there.  In order of appearance:  Roz Chast, Kendra Allenby, Carol Lay, Ana Juan, Anita Kunz, Emily Flake, Amy Kurzweil, Kim Warp, Abigail Gray Swartz, Andrea Arroyo, Liniers, John Cuneo, Tom Toro, Peter Kuper,  Frank Viva, Paul Karasik, Art Spiegelman, R. Sikoryak, Dean Rohrer, Shannon Wheeler, and Daniel Clowes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, link here to the Resist! website.

Credits:

Resist! #2 cover by Malika Fravre, a French artist living in London, England.

Across the Great Red States by Kendra Allenby, a cartoonist and storyboard artist living in Brooklyn, NY.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker

“We’re looking for something that says ‘Death to the Patriarchy’…” by Amy Kurzweil, author of Flying Couches: A Graphic Memoir.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker.

All art copyrighted by the respective artists.

 

Books of Interest Round-Up: Twohy, Toro, Cuneo, Wheeler, Blitt, Karasik, and Chast

It’s mid-year, which is as good a time as any to round-up the New Yorker cartoonist-related books that’ve come out recently and those that will be coming out.

Mouse and Hippo by Mike Twohy. From the publisher:

“Mouse creates a painting for his new friend Hippo—and Hippo returns the kindness in an unlikely way—in this delightful story…”

 

Tiny Hands by Tom Toro. From the publisher: “These cartoons were originally showcased on The New Yorker’s website when Toro was the featured as the Daily Cartoonist.”  Published May 2017. Publisher’s website.

Not Waving But Drawing by John Cuneo. From the publisher: “…Cuneo’s best privately drawn sketchbook pages, each page immediately introduces us to unique takes on sex and domestic life in his signature squiggly style. Not Waving But Drawing is full of dark thoughts, lightly rendered.”  Published February 2017 Publisher’s website.

 

Sh*t My President Says by Shannon Wheeler.  From the publisher: “…illustrations of the often outrageous and inflammatory words from the current leader of the free world, all while using a pretty adorable version of Donald Trump.” Coming in August 2017.  Publisher’s website.

 

Blitt by Barry Blitt.  From the publisher: “…This…full-color collection showcases over a quarter century of Blitt’s most iconic work: his New Yorker covers, from the infamous Obama fist bump and George W. Bush’s drowning cabinet to the many misadventures of Donald Trump; his long-running collaboration with Frank Rich for New York Times.”  Coming in October 2017. Publisher’s website.

 

How To Read Nancy by Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden.  From the publisher: “Everything that you need to know about reading, making, and understanding comics can be found in a single Nancy strip by Ernie Bushmiller from August 8, 1959. Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden’s groundbreaking work How to Read Nancy ingeniously isolates the separate building blocks of the language of comics through the deconstruction of a single strip.” Coming in October 2017. Publisher’s website.

Going Into Town by Roz Chast. From the publisher: “…part playful guide, part New York stories, and part love letter to the city, told through Chast’s laugh-out-loud, touching, and true cartoons.” Coming in October 2017. Publisher’s website.

 

Paul Karasik Delivers Commencement Speech at the Center For Cartoon Studies; CBS This Morning Podcast: Liza Donnelly Talks About Live-Drawing at The White House; Attempted Bloggery Spotlights An Obscure New Yorker Cartoonist

From Vermont’s Valley News, May 13, 2017, “‘It’s OK to Flounder’: Paul Karasik Advises CCS Grads” — this piece on Mr. Karasik’s commencement speech delivered to the Center for Cartoon Studies  11th graduating class.

Link here to Paul Karasik’s New Yorker work.

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Here’s a CBS News podcast, “Drawing At The White House”  featuring Liza Donnelly talking about her recent experience live drawing at The White House for CBS This Morning. (Ms. Donnelly is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist).

Link here to Ms. Donnelly’s website (where you’ll find links to her New Yorker work).

left: Ms. Donnelly on the White House lawn

 

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Attempted Bloggery has thrown its spotlight on a somewhat obscure (very obscure?) New Yorker cartoonist, William Von Riegen. Read the AB  post here. 

left: a Von Riegen New Yorker drawing in the issue of November 12, 1938.