Tilley Watch Online; Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind; Even More Hoff on Attempted Bloggery; Cartoon Cliches (3 parts)

Not so unusual: mostly a Trump week on the Daily, which leads me to note this online query that popped up recently.

Four out of five of the week’s Daily cartoons feature Mr. Trump, while the fifth is inseparable from him. The Daily cartoonists this week: David Sipress, Brendan Loper, Lars Kenseth, Ellis Rosen, and Peter Kuper. All of these drawings can be found here

And over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Barbara SmallerSara Lautman, and Jason Adam Katzenstein (illustrated by Hope Larson).

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

This blog, with the subtitle of “Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine” is now up to January 19, 1929;  the focus of the post is prohibition. What fun! Read it here.

(above: a drawing from the issue by Constantin Alajalov, still spelling his name with “d” in 1929)

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Even More Hoff on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s site continues its (Syd) Hoff Fest.  See it here!

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Cartoon Cliches (3 parts)

Mike Lynch has been posting cartoons from Dick Buchanan’s incredible cartoon clip file. The subject  in recent days is cartoon cliches.  Examples include work by a number of cartoonists published in The New Yorker, including Joe Farris (above), Bud Handelsman, Al Kaufman, Vahan Shirvanian, John Norment, Lee Lorenz, and many more.  See all the parts here.

Vintage Steig; A Richard Decker Self Portrait & One More Kovarsky!

Vintage Steig

From Mike Lynch’s blog, courtesy of Dick Buchanan’s treasure trove of cartoon art, “William Steig Gag Cartoons 1946 – 1965” — see them all here.  (above: from Look magazine, February 17, 1959).

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A Richard Decker Self Portrait and One More Kovarsky!

And speaking of Dick Buchanan, an interesting tear sheet containing a Richard Decker self portrait is the subject of today’s Attempted Bloggery post.  See it here (a portion shown above). And while there scroll down to see an auctioned  Anatol Kovarsky drawing, along with commentary by Mr. Kovarsky’s daughter.

Further info__________________________________

Richard Decker’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Richard Decker (pictured above) Born, Philadelphia, Penn. May 6, 1907. Died, November 1, 1988. New Yorker work, 1931 – 1969, over 900 drawings, and four covers.

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Anatol Kovarsky’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Anatol Kovarsky (photo above, NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) NYer work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

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William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

Walking Tour of Interest: Library of Congress’s “Drawn To Purpose”; Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler; Kovarsky Opening Reception at the Society of Illustrators, Friday, Jan. 12!

From Comics DC, January 9, 2018, “Touring the LoC’s Drawn  to Purpose exhibit with curator Martha Kennedy” — an interesting walk through with Mike Rhode. Among the New Yorker contributors mentioned: Barbara Shermund, Roberta MacDonald, Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Helen Hokinson, and Alice Harvey. Read it here.

Link to the Library of Congress’s page here.

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Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler

From Bleeding Cool. January 9, 2018, “Shannon Wheeler’s Exhibition of Trump Cartoons, Across From Mar-A-Lago

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A Reminder: The Opening Reception for the Society of Illustrator’s exhibit “Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker” is this Friday, January 12thDetails here.  

More Unseen Kovarsky: Mike Lynch has posted a number of previously unpublished work by Mr. Kovarsky.  See it here!

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.; More Booth!

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.

I know, I know… you woke up this morning wondering if John Held, Jr., who became famous for his drawings of flappers in and on the cover of the pre-Luce Life ever did advertising work.  Well courtesy of Warren Bernard‘s detective work, we have some examples of Mr. Held’s commercial work. My thanks to Mr. Bernard for sharing his findings with Ink Spill.

New Yorker readers who have dipped into the magazine’s cartoon anthologies or looked through ancient issues would certainly have come across Mr. Held’s work — but it wasn’t the style that brought him fame. His New Yorker work looks like this:

  Harold Ross, the New Yorker‘s founder and first editor (who met Held in high school when they both worked on the school newspaper,The Red and Black)  wanted Held in his new magazine, but he didn’t want Held’s famous flapper style work. According to Thomas Kunkel, in his magnificent biography of Ross, Genius in Disguise:

“Ross and [Rea] Irvin eschewed his [Held’s] overexposed flappers, instead publishing his contemporary twists on the Gay Nineties woodcuts Ross had loved as a boy.”

So what you see here are examples of Held’s non-New Yorker style. The Ovington Gift Shop ad was published during the heart of the Roaring 20s (1926), and the others were published in 1929 — the year that ended so badly.

Here’s John Held, Jr.’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

John Held, Jr. (Pictured above. Source: Sketchbook of American Humorists, 1938) Born, January 10, 1889, Salt Lake City, Utah. Died, 1958, Belmar, New Jersey. New Yorker work: April 11, 1925 – Sept. 17, 1932.

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More Booth!

Mike Lynch and Jane Mattimoe have posted pieces about the wonderful George Booth exhibit at The Society of Illustrators.  The exhibit, as you can see in the poster, is up now and will run through the end of this year. Do not miss!

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Live; Obscure Otto Soglow; Book of Interest: Cartoons From Maine; Drawing Dogs w/ Booth

New Yorker Cartoonists Live

Event of interest tomorrow night! This just posted on Instagram a few hours ago by the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen:

 Emily Flake, Jeremy Nguyen and Farley Katz will join Ms. Allen at Dover Street Market. Somebody who’s going please take photos and send to the Spill.

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Obscure Otto Soglow

Stephen Nadler, over at Attempted Bloggery, has posted a rarity: an Otto Soglow cover for Broadcasting: The Weekly News Magazine of Radio, dated March 24, 1941.  Above is a snippet.  To see the whole thing go here.

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Book of Interest: Cartoons From Maine

It’s a long way off (due out in May of 2018) but here’s the cover for a collection of cartoons about Maine by Maine cartoonists, edited by Mike Lynch.

 The contributors: Bill Woodman, David Jacobson, John Klossner, Mike Lynch, and Jeff Pert

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Drawing Dogs with Booth

From The Paris Review, “Drawing Dogs in George Booth’s Living Room”  — this fun piece about Sandra Boynton drawing with Mr. Booth.