Cartoonist Mike Lynch on Dwindling Cartoon Markets; Mischa Richter on Attempted Bloggery; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

From Mike Lynch, May 2, 2018, “Another Market For Gag Cartoons is Going Going Gone”

Reader’s Digest is in the headlights here.

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 Attempted Bloggery on Mischa Richter

Following up his E. Simms Campbell fest, Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery moves on to Mischa Richter. Looking forward to what he has come up with. See today’s Richter post here.

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A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

A New Yorker State of Mind forges ahead with another in-depth look at an issue from ages ago.  Above: The issue, with an Arthur Kronengold cover — one of 22 of his published by the magazine. Here’s the post! 

 

 

Kickstarter of Interest: Maine Cartoonists; Cartoon Companion Rates the New New Yorker Cartoons

Kickstarter of Interest: Maine Cartoonists

Here’s a short Kickstarter video for Lobster Therapy & Moose Pickup Lines by Maine cartoonists Bill Woodman, John Klossner, and David Jacobson (and one very-close-to-the Maine-border-cartoonist, Mike Lynch).

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Cartoon Companion Rates the New New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” & “Simon” focus on all the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker — the issue with the Hockney on the cover. Read it all here.

Dick Buchanan’s 40s Faves: Barbara Shermund, Chon Day, Addams, C.E.M, Barlow, Richard Taylor, and More; Publishers Weekly on the Growing Popularity of MoCCA’s Fest

Dick Buchanan’s 40s Faves

Mike Lynch has been posting selected materials from the Dick Buchanan Files for quite some time.  In today’s post Mr. Buchanan offers up favorites from the 1940s. All of the cartoonists in this post would’ve been familiar to New Yorker readers (and some still are). See them here.

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Publishers Weekly on MoCCA’s Popularity

From PW, April 11, 2018, “Exhibitors, Fans Keep Growing at MoCCA Fest 2018”

 

Interview of Interest: Chon Day

Courtesy of Mike Lynch’s blog, we are able to read what is surely an obscure interview with Chon Day that appeared in a publication from the early 1960s, Pro Cartoonist & Gagwriter

Here’s Mr. Day’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Chon Day (self portrait above from Collier’s Collects Its Wits) Born April 6, 1907, Chatham , NJ. Died January 1, 2000, Rhode Island. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1998. Collection: I Could Be Dreaming (Robert M. McBride & Co., 1945). Brother Sebastian (Hanover House, 1957). 

Go here to Mr. Lynch’s blog to see the interview & more.  Mr. Day’s interview appears in two parts.

Tilley Watch Online; Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind; Even More Hoff on Attempted Bloggery; Cartoon Cliches (3 parts)

Not so unusual: mostly a Trump week on the Daily, which leads me to note this online query that popped up recently.

Four out of five of the week’s Daily cartoons feature Mr. Trump, while the fifth is inseparable from him. The Daily cartoonists this week: David Sipress, Brendan Loper, Lars Kenseth, Ellis Rosen, and Peter Kuper. All of these drawings can be found here

And over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Barbara SmallerSara Lautman, and Jason Adam Katzenstein (illustrated by Hope Larson).

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

This blog, with the subtitle of “Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine” is now up to January 19, 1929;  the focus of the post is prohibition. What fun! Read it here.

(above: a drawing from the issue by Constantin Alajalov, still spelling his name with “d” in 1929)

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Even More Hoff on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s site continues its (Syd) Hoff Fest.  See it here!

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Cartoon Cliches (3 parts)

Mike Lynch has been posting cartoons from Dick Buchanan’s incredible cartoon clip file. The subject  in recent days is cartoon cliches.  Examples include work by a number of cartoonists published in The New Yorker, including Joe Farris (above), Bud Handelsman, Al Kaufman, Vahan Shirvanian, John Norment, Lee Lorenz, and many more.  See all the parts here.

Vintage Steig; A Richard Decker Self Portrait & One More Kovarsky!

Vintage Steig

From Mike Lynch’s blog, courtesy of Dick Buchanan’s treasure trove of cartoon art, “William Steig Gag Cartoons 1946 – 1965” — see them all here.  (above: from Look magazine, February 17, 1959).

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A Richard Decker Self Portrait and One More Kovarsky!

And speaking of Dick Buchanan, an interesting tear sheet containing a Richard Decker self portrait is the subject of today’s Attempted Bloggery post.  See it here (a portion shown above). And while there scroll down to see an auctioned  Anatol Kovarsky drawing, along with commentary by Mr. Kovarsky’s daughter.

Further info__________________________________

Richard Decker’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Richard Decker (pictured above) Born, Philadelphia, Penn. May 6, 1907. Died, November 1, 1988. New Yorker work, 1931 – 1969, over 900 drawings, and four covers.

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Anatol Kovarsky’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Anatol Kovarsky (photo above, NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) NYer work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

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William Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. New Yorker work: 1930 -2003.